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Author Topic: Who Has Good Civil Liberties and Constitutional Law Programs?  (Read 1810 times)

Socrates

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Re: Who Has Good Civil Liberties and Constitutional Law Programs?
« Reply #10 on: June 26, 2007, 01:19:16 AM »
^Thank god. Rand blows.

sinkfloridasink

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Re: Who Has Good Civil Liberties and Constitutional Law Programs?
« Reply #11 on: June 26, 2007, 01:48:22 AM »
You're obviously not a Rand fan.

Honestly, is anyone really a Rand fan?
Tulane c/o 2011

thedudebro

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Re: Who Has Good Civil Liberties and Constitutional Law Programs?
« Reply #12 on: June 26, 2007, 01:52:17 AM »
^Thank god. Rand blows.

True.

Commie bastards. Why don't you two move to Israel and join a kibbutz? Even better, go out in the woods, meditate naked, and become "one" with the universe.

Lindbergh

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Re: Who Has Good Civil Liberties and Constitutional Law Programs?
« Reply #13 on: June 26, 2007, 01:53:34 AM »
You're obviously not a Rand fan.

Honestly, is anyone really a Rand fan?


Only the people who actually understand her position, I suppose.

Lindbergh

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Re: Who Has Good Civil Liberties and Constitutional Law Programs?
« Reply #14 on: June 26, 2007, 01:54:52 AM »
I'm interested in Civil Liberties and Constitutional Law (so basically I'm in love with the Bill of Rights).  Does anyone know of any schools that have a special focus in this area?  And does it really matter which school you go to if you have a particular style of law in mind? 

hippy bleeding heart liberal. the bill of rights was designed by the mob of lesser humans in order to keep the strong and powerful aristocratic few from enjoying their manifest destiny, and will one day be destroyed through the actions of heroes.


You're confused.

The BOR was designed as a check on the tyranny of the majority, and implicitly protects the superior individual from the masses.

You may, however, have a beef with the equal protection clause, or the Civil Rights Act.

sinkfloridasink

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Re: Who Has Good Civil Liberties and Constitutional Law Programs?
« Reply #15 on: June 26, 2007, 01:55:38 AM »
You're obviously not a Rand fan.

Honestly, is anyone really a Rand fan?

Where art thou Hank?

Really, the only people I've ever met that have actually claimed to be Rand fans were trying waaayy too hard to be pretentious and "intellectual," when in reality all they did was read The Fountainhead and thought it was "deep."
Tulane c/o 2011

Lindbergh

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Re: Who Has Good Civil Liberties and Constitutional Law Programs?
« Reply #16 on: June 26, 2007, 01:58:30 AM »
You're obviously not a Rand fan.

Honestly, is anyone really a Rand fan?

Where art thou Hank?

Really, the only people I've ever met that have actually claimed to be Rand fans were trying waaayy too hard to be pretentious and "intellectual," when in reality all they did was read The Fountainhead and thought it was "deep."


I don't think her work is all that complex.

All she's saying is that individual spirit and creativity is the fountainhead of most human achievement, and that we should stay true to our ourselves.

Seems pretty basic and straightforward to me, but it is revolutionary in explicitly rejecting the more communal philosophy that underlies most major religion, including Christianity.

thedudebro

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Re: Who Has Good Civil Liberties and Constitutional Law Programs?
« Reply #17 on: June 26, 2007, 02:14:39 AM »
I'm interested in Civil Liberties and Constitutional Law (so basically I'm in love with the Bill of Rights).  Does anyone know of any schools that have a special focus in this area?  And does it really matter which school you go to if you have a particular style of law in mind? 

hippy bleeding heart liberal. the bill of rights was designed by the mob of lesser humans in order to keep the strong and powerful aristocratic few from enjoying their manifest destiny, and will one day be destroyed through the actions of heroes.


You're confused.

The BOR was designed as a check on the tyranny of the majority, and implicitly protects the superior individual from the masses.

You may, however, have a beef with the equal protection clause, or the Civil Rights Act.

Why would a superior individual need rights? A superior individual does what he wants, when he wants, and doesn't need some piece of paper telling him what he's entitled to. Only when the weak bind together do they establish rights for themselves, so that those greater than they cannot destroy them.

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Re: Who Has Good Civil Liberties and Constitutional Law Programs?
« Reply #18 on: June 26, 2007, 10:41:15 AM »
I would like to go into this field also

Hank Rearden

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Re: Who Has Good Civil Liberties and Constitutional Law Programs?
« Reply #19 on: June 26, 2007, 10:56:52 AM »
I'm interested in Civil Liberties and Constitutional Law (so basically I'm in love with the Bill of Rights).  Does anyone know of any schools that have a special focus in this area?  And does it really matter which school you go to if you have a particular style of law in mind? 

hippy bleeding heart liberal. the bill of rights was designed by the mob of lesser humans in order to keep the strong and powerful aristocratic few from enjoying their manifest destiny, and will one day be destroyed through the actions of heroes.


You're confused.

The BOR was designed as a check on the tyranny of the majority, and implicitly protects the superior individual from the masses.

You may, however, have a beef with the equal protection clause, or the Civil Rights Act.

Why would a superior individual need rights?

To protect him or her from the looting masses, a la Ayn Rand novels.

More mysterious than how many people admire Rand's philosophy is how horrified some people are (like Andrew) of her even being mentioned.  There is something about her ideas that they fear.  I'm with Lindbergh--what's wrong about valuing human creativity and the individual spirit?  That's what the thrust of her philosophy is all about.  It has just never seemed that controversial to me. 
CLS '10

The appropriateness of Perpetua would probably depend on the tone of the writing.  When I used it, I (half playfully) thought the extra space made the words sort of resonate.