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Got one thats law related?

Yes
 32 (40.5%)
Not Yet
 1 (1.3%)
Dont want one
 4 (5.1%)
Cant get one
 2 (2.5%)
Other/View
 40 (50.6%)

Total Members Voted: 79

Author Topic: 1L Summer Jobs  (Read 19878 times)

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Re: 1L Summer Jobs
« Reply #250 on: August 08, 2007, 12:00:40 PM »
Nothing changes for me because I'll still be working for the same place, but the interviewing has begun.  And I just got my first callback interview!  ;D

what does that mean in English?

your going to be working during the school yr?
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Re: 1L Summer Jobs
« Reply #251 on: August 08, 2007, 12:02:43 PM »
Nothing changes for me because I'll still be working for the same place, but the interviewing has begun.  And I just got my first callback interview!  ;D

what does that mean in English?

your going to be working during the school yr?

Yes, because I get my tuition waived if I do.

A callback interview means that I had one interview with the firm and they are asking me back to their offices (my first interview was at a job fair) to have a longer interview and meet more people.  You get summer associate offers after callback interviews.  Or maybe they're not called callback interviews everywhere, but that's what I call them.

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Re: 1L Summer Jobs
« Reply #252 on: August 08, 2007, 12:08:56 PM »
Nothing changes for me because I'll still be working for the same place, but the interviewing has begun.  And I just got my first callback interview!  ;D

what does that mean in English?

your going to be working during the school yr?

Yes, because I get my tuition waived if I do.

A callback interview means that I had one interview with the firm and they are asking me back to their offices (my first interview was at a job fair) to have a longer interview and meet more people.  You get summer associate offers after callback interviews.  Or maybe they're not called callback interviews everywhere, but that's what I call them.


woot woot  :o)
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Re: 1L Summer Jobs
« Reply #253 on: August 08, 2007, 12:09:38 PM »
tag

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Re: 1L Summer Jobs
« Reply #254 on: September 24, 2007, 12:21:00 PM »
summers over, how did u like your jobs?
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Re: 1L Summer Jobs
« Reply #255 on: September 24, 2007, 11:12:16 PM »
you bitches owe me...

                           LESSONS FROM A MOCK INTERVIEW WORKSHOP
                              By: Chris Dunagan, J.D., Education and Career Coach
         Recently I had the privilege of interviewing second year (2L) and third year (3L) law
students participating in a mock interview workshop sponsored by the Law School Outreach
Committee of the Atlanta Bar Association. I was assigned to an interview panel with two
delightful senior associates, both of whom are active in the recruiting and interviewing efforts of
their mid-size and large Atlanta law firms.1 The participating law students interviewed by my
panel were from top law schools in Georgia and represented a range of academic performance,
including some in the top 10% of their class. Generally, I was impressed with the caliber of
interesting people interviewed by our panel, but I was surprised by some of the “rookie”
mistakes and the widespread lack of meaningful focus articulated by such highly accomplished
and motivated people. The following observations and comments are offered in the hope that
someone will find a nugget or two that will help land the job that is the right fit for them.2
         You only get one chance to make a first impression. Lose the chewing gum. If you
forget and pass the point of no return, swallow it. Do not, as one otherwise charming 2L did,
push it to the roof of your mouth hoping the interviewers will not notice your artificially created
speech impediment. We noticed. We also noticed an unkempt blouse collar and a sloppily tied
tie. You are applying for a job in a field where attention to detail is a way of life. You simply
must check in with the bathroom mirror before going in for the interview. Also, stick with
traditional, conservative interview fashion, at least until you get to know the firm.
           Relax. You want the prospective employer to feel comfortable putting you in front of
clients one day. Your best impression of a long-tail cat in a room full of rocking chairs is not the
image you want to convey. Do not fidget and do not kick your chair or the underside of the
table. You may not realize how you appear to others. Take advantage of practice interview
workshops and consider also video taping or audio taping mock interview sessions with friends
for additional practice and feedback. If you tend to get nervous during interviews, here is a tip:
it’s not about you. Work with me on this one – the interview is not about you. The interview is
about the employer’s challenges and whether you are the solution to those challenges. Since it’s
not about you, you have nothing at all to be self-conscious or nervous about.
         Distinguish yourself by demonstrating your willingness to invest in your own future.
Your preparation for a job interview says a lot about how you likely may approach client
matters. At a minimum, research the firm website, Martindale Hubble and your favorite internet
search engine. If you know who in particular will be conducting your interview, express any
genuine interest in their recent publications and otherwise look for common ground to establish a
connection. So, you want to be a labor and employment lawyer and you want this firm to bear
the cost of your learning the ropes? What have you done to prove yourself a good investment?
What have you done to show initiative in this area of law that you claim interests you? How
1
  The author wishes to acknowledge, with appreciation and admiration, attorneys Trishanda L. Treadwell, with the
law firm of Parker, Hudson, Rainer & Dobbs, LLP, and Rahmah A. Abdulaleem, with the law firm of King &
Spalding, LLP, for sharing the mock interview experience with him.
2
  While this article offers commentary about mock interviews of law students, most of the comments offered apply
equally to any job interview environment.
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Re: 1L Summer Jobs
« Reply #256 on: September 24, 2007, 11:12:48 PM »
many “informational interviews” have you had, or even requested, with practicing lawyers in the
field? How many relevant local bar association section events have you attended? (Yes, you can
attend those, and you will find many lawyers who will be delighted for you to listen to what they
have to say.) How many times have you called a practicing lawyer in a big firm, small firm, solo
practice, corporation, non-profit association, or government agency, in a mix of transactional and
litigation practice areas, and said: “Hi, my name is Jane Smith. I am a law student trying to
figure out what area of law will best fit me. I am not asking or applying for a job, but I was
hoping you could spare 15 minutes to tell me about what you do and what it is really like in your
practice area and environment.” How many times do you think interviewers hear the canned
response about wanting to clerk with a firm offering a wide variety of practice areas so you can
find the right area of practice? As a practical matter, you do not have time to experience every
practice area, and the experience you gain as a summer associate is, in most cases, a poor
substitute for the real thing. If you invest in a significant number of informational interviews
with practicing lawyers from a variety of practice areas and environments, you will learn far
more than you will ever learn as a summer associate and you will handily distinguish yourself
from your competition. (Incidentally, when conducting informational interviews, it is not
enough to know that Joe Lawyer dislikes what he does and Jill Lawyer loves what she does.
You have to ask why Joe and Jill feel the way they do and apply that to your own life. For
example, maybe Joe is introverted and wishes he could spend more time alone writing briefs
instead of continually sitting in on client board meetings which he finds draining. Maybe Jill is
extroverted and is energized by days filled with non-stop client contact. In the end, objective
data about what Joe and Jill do is more valuable than subjective data about how Joe and Jill feel
about what they do because, in the same situation, you may feel differently than either of them.
Your goal as an informational interviewer is to get a clear picture of the situation so you can
make your own judgments.)
         Anticipate the obvious. Come up with a list of questions you can expect to be asked
based on the information in your resume. Ask friends to help, and do the same for them. For
example, if your resume reflects an interesting summer abroad rather than a summer associate
position, you will be asked questions about that. If you left a job as an engineer to go to law
school, anticipate questions about that. Prepare a thoughtful response. (Forced to answer a
question like that on the spot without prior thought, you risk saying something like, “As an
engineer, I was too far removed from the end user of my work product to feel fulfilled and I
think working as a lawyer in a big firm will be more fulfilling in that regard.”) If you are asked
about your fluency in Spanish, French, Italian or whatever language you speak, don’t say, “yes, I
am fluent.” Instead, say something meaningful in the applicable language and then translate it to
English if necessary. If you list your hobby of singing in a traveling vocal group, don’t be too
bashful to belt out a bar or two if asked. If you had a summer associate position last summer, be
prepared for the inevitable: Did you get an offer to come back? If you clerked for a small firm
or sole practitioner, do NOT shy away from the fact that the firm does not have enough work to
absorb you as an associate. Every practicing lawyer understands that issue.
         Be focused. Be a meaningful specific rather than a wandering generality. When asked
why you went to law school or what you want to do with your law degree, do not, in the same
breath, say you have a social conscience and want to be an instrument of social change and help
people by representing large corporations to make sure their rights are protected. Do not profess
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Re: 1L Summer Jobs
« Reply #257 on: September 24, 2007, 11:13:17 PM »
your concerns about quality of life issues in the first interview. There will be time for that later,
and if the firm is known for its lifestyle qualities, they will let you know. (Caveat emptor: one
lawyer’s lifestyle firm is another lawyer’s sweatshop. However, the first interview is not the
time to sort out those issues). An interest in pro bono is fine, but realize that is not how law
firms make money. No one expects you to know at this stage of the game that you want to be an
estate planning lawyer with a focus on special needs trusts, or that your passion is representing
government contractors in some obscure area of regulatory compliance. However, you should be
able to articulate some focus about who you are and what you are about. Ideally, you should also
be able to offer some ideas about how to translate that focus into one or more potential areas of
practice and explain, based on your extensive informational interviewing, why you think those
areas of practice may be a good fit for you.
        Be prepared to ask good questions. You are not begging for a job. You are looking for
the right fit. You have something of value to offer. That bears repeating: you have something
of value to offer, unique and distinct from anyone else. The only way to determine if this
particular employer is the right fit for both of you is for you to ask good questions. Have
standard questions prepared in advance, and adapt them on the fly based on information you
learn during the interview.
        Be a real person. Most likely, your academic credentials are good enough for the
employer interviewing you or you would not have gotten the interview. Now the interviewer
wants to know whether you are an enjoyable person to spend time with and whether they can put
you in front of clients without embarrassing the firm. If you tend to be quiet and shy, practice
balancing that natural tendency with some confidence and respectful assertiveness. If you tend
to be stand-offish, practice being warm and engaging. If you tend to ramble on, practice being
concise and to the point. Know that, especially in the big firms, the first cut in the interview
process may be made by socially outgoing associates who, at least in part, may be looking for
someone interesting to go to lunch with. Include an “Interests” section at the bottom of your
resume and know that many of the battle-hardened gatekeepers will look at that section first. Do
not be afraid to be yourself. In most cases, your unusual hobby probably is not as weird as you
think, but when in doubt about what to include or how to describe it, ask some trusted friends or
your school career office for a second opinion.
        Your law school resume must be one page and flawless. If you wrote a long list of
interesting articles during your prior life as a medical researcher, refer to the articles in one line
on the resume and carry a separate list of the articles with you to distribute if there is interest.
Meticulously proof your resume, and ask other people to proof it for you. There must be no
typos. Beware of offering too much detail. The ideal resume clearly conveys something about
the essence of who you are from a very, very fast scan.
        Pay attention to people and things. Do you know the names of the administrative
assistant who set up your interview and the receptionist who greeted you upon your arrival at the
firm? Did you notice the unusual artwork or memento on display in the firm reception area?
The associates at the firm probably won’t ask you about those things, but some of the partners
might.
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Re: 1L Summer Jobs
« Reply #258 on: September 24, 2007, 11:13:47 PM »
         Be careful listing political activity on your resume. If you served as intern to an elected
representative, its fine to say so, but don’t overdo it with “Democratic this and Democratic that”
or “Republican this and Republican that.”
         Show your local connections. If you are in law school in Georgia and applying for a job
in Georgia, do not use your Auburn (or other out of town) cell phone number on your resume.
Get a local number.
         Embrace rejection. Most lawyers in the country do not work for large firms and most
firms you interview with are not going to make an offer. Expect and embrace that reality. Each
rejection from the wrong employer brings you one step closer to the right offer for you. Not all
law firms, lawyers or law students are the same. In a competitive market, focusing on the right
fit for you will give you the edge.
Chris Dunagan, J.D., is an Education and Career Coach. After practicing law in Atlanta for 14 years, in a
wide range of practice areas and environments, he helps people discover what they do best and helps
them focus on education and career paths that fit their natural, God-given talents. He may be reached at:
                                      Christopher H. Dunagan, LLC
                                    4343 Shallowford Road, Suite H-1
                                           Marietta, GA 30062
                                              770.641.3077
                                      chrisdunagan@bellsouth.net
                                       www.YourTrueTalent.com
          © 2007 Chris Dunagan. May be freely shared and distributed, in full, without alteration.
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Re: 1L Summer Jobs
« Reply #259 on: October 09, 2007, 10:04:59 AM »
anyone ever take a summer international job?
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