Law School Discussion

"On Being a Happy, Healthy and Ethical Mbr of an Unhappy, Unhealthy and Unethi..

Has any of you read an article called "On Being a Happy, Healthy and Ethical Member of an Unhappy, Unhealthy and Unethical Profession" by Patrick Schiltz from Vanderbilt Law Review?

It's an article advising future law school graduates not to enter private practice, backed with LOTS of statistical and empirical data. Or if you will, to do so with maximum discretion. I myself have plans to practice corporate law, but now I don't know. After reading this article, it really doesn't look like a good idea.

If you've read it, tell me what you think...

-Confused

Thistle

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Has any of you read an article called "On Being a Happy, Healthy and Ethical Member of an Unhappy, Unhealthy and Unethical Profession" by Patrick Schiltz from Vanderbilt Law Review?

It's an article advising future law school graduates not to enter private practice, backed with LOTS of statistical and empirical data. Or if you will, to do so with maximum discretion. I myself have plans to practice corporate law, but now I don't know. After reading this article, it really doesn't look like a good idea.

If you've read it, tell me what you think...

-Confused


cite it and i'll read it

Has any of you read an article called "On Being a Happy, Healthy and Ethical Member of an Unhappy, Unhealthy and Unethical Profession" by Patrick Schiltz from Vanderbilt Law Review?

It's an article advising future law school graduates not to enter private practice, backed with LOTS of statistical and empirical data. Or if you will, to do so with maximum discretion. I myself have plans to practice corporate law, but now I don't know. After reading this article, it really doesn't look like a good idea.

If you've read it, tell me what you think...

-Confused

I had to read it for my ethics class and thought it was crap. The reality is that most people in lots of professions dislike their jobs, but most other professions also give you more flexibility to leave because you don't come out so far in debt. I don't get the impression that the author worked in any fields other than law to see the general discontent. Of my friends who aren't lawyers, most of them are not happy in their jobs.

Certain things like billing in 10-15 minute intervals are also not confined to law. I worked in several other jobs that had a same billing structure. It's not like clients are blindsided by this- they know that they aren't getting billed by the minute.

queencruella, I agree with you on the point that many other professions have low job satisfaction. I, for one, am currently an intern at a prominent NPO. Needless to say, it's not the most fun job in the world.

But author knows it too and provide data on this. On page 874 (pdf page 4) the three most depressing professions (calculated by percentage of those suffering from MDD: Major Depressive Disorder) are lawyers, primary and special ed teachers and secretaries. The legal profession trumps the other two by 3.6 times. This can't be an insignificant finding, in my opinion.

Well I'm not a champion of this article or know the author on a personal level or anything.
Just thought the article was really mind-boggling in a sense that it sheds a different light on work life of corporate law. I'm interested to hear what other people think about this. If you wanna read the article PM me your email add and I'll forward it to you.

queencruella, I agree with you on the point that many other professions have low job satisfaction. I, for one, am currently an intern at a prominent NPO. Needless to say, it's not the most fun job in the world.

But author knows it too and provide data on this. On page 874 (pdf page 4) the three most depressing professions (calculated by percentage of those suffering from MDD: Major Depressive Disorder) are lawyers, primary and special ed teachers and secretaries. The legal profession trumps the other two by 3.6 times. This can't be an insignificant finding, in my opinion.

Well I'm not a champion of this article or know the author on a personal level or anything.
Just thought the article was really mind-boggling in a sense that it sheds a different light on work life of corporate law. I'm interested to hear what other people think about this. If you wanna read the article PM me your email add and I'll forward it to you.


Keep in mind this article is 10+ years old and at that time, the average age of law students was pretty low. More students now are entering the profession after working at least 1-2 years- many doing paralegal or other law-related work. I think before, you had a lot more people going into law with no idea what they were getting into. I think he also focuses a lot on marriage and having a family equating to happiness, which is less the norm than it was a few years ago.

DDBY

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Not interested in reading it.  Who is he?  Why should I give that author the power to effect my decisions, and my future.

I've never let anyone tell me what I can and cannot do.  Usually they are expressing thier own concerns, and insecirities about their own abilities, and personalities.  Thier impressions have nothing to do with me.

There are a select few who's opinions matter to me and even then I have to remember they are human and I take thier advice, and view thier perspectives with a grain of salt. 

Hank Rearden

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You got to live for yourself

Yourself and nobody else

Lenny

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I've worked with Schiltz.  He was a Scalia clerk and then almost immediately became a prof at Notre Dame.  He may have been in private practice or DOJ in between, but it wasn't long.  He then went from Notre Dame to be one of the head honchos at St. Thomas Law and is now a federal judge as of 2006. 

The condescending and superior tone of his article is typical.  He is of the belief that his way is the only way, and his way has not included a lot of private practice.

His stats and all are probably correct, and so maybe they speak for themselves.  But Schiltz is still a self-righteous pinhead.  I shudder to think about what he's like as a federal judge.

Hank Rearden

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His stats and all are probably correct, and so maybe they speak for themselves.  But Schiltz is still a self-righteous pinhead.  I shudder to think about what he's like as a federal judge.

Hopefully like his mentor, Scalia.   :)

Thistle

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speaking of ethics, i curse the bastard who took acts of arkansas, book 1, volume 1, 1968 extraordinary session OFF OF EVERY f-ing FLOOR IN THE LIBRARY because, of course, its the one book i need to prepare a case for next week.