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Author Topic: Law School Reading Lists  (Read 4948 times)

doibhilin

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Re: Law School Reading Lists
« Reply #50 on: May 28, 2007, 04:46:47 PM »
In all honesty, I think the more the merrier!

I think that intelligent design should be taught alongside evolution.
Let the students decide for themselves.

In my senior year of high school, I read "The Fixer" by Bernard Malamud, quite possibly the most disgusting book I have ever read. "The Catcher in the Rye" wasn't that great, either. But they definitely expanded my thinking!

At university, I remember when a lot of my fellow classmates got upset when we had to read The Bhagavad-Gita in my honors class. As a Christian, I embraced the idea of reading this book. It challenged my worldview and exposed me to a different culture and to different ideas. As a result of reading the book, I had a greater understanding of another culture, and my beliefs were actually strengthened. That, I believe, is what education should be all about!

Banning books does nothing but stifle education, IMO.

Let the students decide for themselves? Should we also teach about the four humors, and eugenics? Should we teach an alternative to heliocentrism?

There's a difference between reading the Bhagavad-Gita, which enriches your cultural education, and reading pseudo-science. Culture is relative, science is not.

dougiefresh

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Re: Law School Reading Lists
« Reply #51 on: May 28, 2007, 06:41:53 PM »
"Gunner" doesn't just apply to classroom behavior - that's just the most visible form of it.  Always talking about class/cases while out at bars = gunnerish behavior.  Trying to read as much law fiction as possible on the off-chance it gives you a fraction of insight into law school = gunnerish behavior.  This thread wasn't asking "What are some interesting books to read about the law?" so much as "How many books about law should I read to prepare for 1L?"  If you're going to read these books because you think you'll get an edge, that's gunnerish.  If you're going to read them because you will enjoy them, then to each his own.
By your definition the mere act of posting on this site "Law School discussion" while not in school makes you a gunner.

Qwiz, there's no definition in my post, just examples.  You're taking a lot of steps to get from my examples to yours.

My basic point was that people should enjoy their last summer before law school.  If reading as many law books as possible does it for you, then do it.  But I think you'll do a disservice to yourself if you force yourself to read a lot of material now - you won't be efficient at it and might burn out.

Reminds me of the story of the ant and the grasshopper.  All summer, the ant slaved away and stored up food while the grasshopper frolicked around and had fun.  Then winter came, and the ant died, and the grasshopper took all his stuff.  And he also got a ferrari.  Is any of this getting through?
Air Flare - attending NU in Fall 2007

Alan Shore

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Re: Law School Reading Lists
« Reply #52 on: May 28, 2007, 09:36:32 PM »
In all honesty, I think the more the merrier!

I think that intelligent design should be taught alongside evolution.
Let the students decide for themselves.

In my senior year of high school, I read "The Fixer" by Bernard Malamud, quite possibly the most disgusting book I have ever read. "The Catcher in the Rye" wasn't that great, either. But they definitely expanded my thinking!

At university, I remember when a lot of my fellow classmates got upset when we had to read The Bhagavad-Gita in my honors class. As a Christian, I embraced the idea of reading this book. It challenged my worldview and exposed me to a different culture and to different ideas. As a result of reading the book, I had a greater understanding of another culture, and my beliefs were actually strengthened. That, I believe, is what education should be all about!

Banning books does nothing but stifle education, IMO.

Let the students decide for themselves? Should we also teach about the four humors, and eugenics? Should we teach an alternative to heliocentrism?

There's a difference between reading the Bhagavad-Gita, which enriches your cultural education, and reading pseudo-science. Culture is relative, science is not.

Without going into the 'scientific debate' I was referring to the intelligent design books that were censored. Why can't we teach that as a culture and an idea? And why can't we teach the Bible as a culture? Everybody is so opposed to doing those things!

Alan Shore

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Re: Law School Reading Lists
« Reply #53 on: May 28, 2007, 09:37:19 PM »
Oh, and another book I think we could add to the list,
"The Innocent Man" by John Grisham.
If that doesn't get you disgusted with the system for at least a short while, nothing will!
(And let me point out, I believe in the system!)

doibhilin

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Re: Law School Reading Lists
« Reply #54 on: May 28, 2007, 10:51:57 PM »
In all honesty, I think the more the merrier!

I think that intelligent design should be taught alongside evolution.
Let the students decide for themselves.

In my senior year of high school, I read "The Fixer" by Bernard Malamud, quite possibly the most disgusting book I have ever read. "The Catcher in the Rye" wasn't that great, either. But they definitely expanded my thinking!

At university, I remember when a lot of my fellow classmates got upset when we had to read The Bhagavad-Gita in my honors class. As a Christian, I embraced the idea of reading this book. It challenged my worldview and exposed me to a different culture and to different ideas. As a result of reading the book, I had a greater understanding of another culture, and my beliefs were actually strengthened. That, I believe, is what education should be all about!

Banning books does nothing but stifle education, IMO.

Let the students decide for themselves? Should we also teach about the four humors, and eugenics? Should we teach an alternative to heliocentrism?

There's a difference between reading the Bhagavad-Gita, which enriches your cultural education, and reading pseudo-science. Culture is relative, science is not.

Without going into the 'scientific debate' I was referring to the intelligent design books that were censored. Why can't we teach that as a culture and an idea? And why can't we teach the Bible as a culture? Everybody is so opposed to doing those things!

Intelligent design books aren't "censored." Most people do not want them taught in science classrooms. The debate is about science education, not cultural education.

We can't teach the Bible as a culture in public schools because we cannot trust teachers to actually teach it as culture. It would undoubtedly be taught as religion in most districts. Besides, it's not as if American public school students aren't exposed to Christian culture -- literature and history curriculums almost exclusively focus on Christian Europe.

Alan Shore

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Re: Law School Reading Lists
« Reply #55 on: May 29, 2007, 12:25:14 AM »
Eh, I still think that the Bible can be taught in a secular manner.

And my high school literature was predominately pro-Jewish and pro-African American culture. The 'Christian' texts we read were inflammatory stuff like John Edwards' revival sermons and fundamentalist extreme ideas like in "The Scarlet Letter."


Princessa1

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Re: Law School Reading Lists
« Reply #56 on: May 29, 2007, 02:44:57 PM »
Eh, I still think that the Bible can be taught in a secular manner.

And my high school literature was predominately pro-Jewish and pro-African American culture. The 'Christian' texts we read were inflammatory stuff like John Edwards' revival sermons and fundamentalist extreme ideas like in "The Scarlet Letter."



It would make me feel uncomfortable as a student to study the bible in public school, especially if not in a comparative setting with other "equally important" religious texts.

I agree that the bible def can be taught in a secular setting, and is probably important for understanding some literature, but I think it is better taught as an optional class in college.
Harvard Law School, Class of 2010!

skeeball

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Re: Law School Reading Lists
« Reply #57 on: May 29, 2007, 03:30:27 PM »
Wait....your school sent you a suggested reading list in MAY?  ???

I can't even get my school to acknowledge my 2nd seat deposit!

Until they tell me what I should be reading, I've got about 6 or 7 fictions titles lined up that I'll be reading for PURE ENJOYMENT.

DDBY

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Re: Law School Reading Lists
« Reply #58 on: May 29, 2007, 03:36:49 PM »
All of the reading suggestions are for enjoyment.  If you do start a self study, however, I see no reason why you would get burned out except if you really don't want to be lawyer.  What are we kidding here if you plan to practice law for the next 50 years what's a few month of summer reading.  You really should love it.  If you can get burned out in 3 months you won't make it through L.S. let alone become a lawyer.


 

pinkisthenewlawschool

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Re: Law School Reading Lists
« Reply #59 on: May 29, 2007, 05:15:55 PM »
Nancy Grace is retarded, I was under the impression that everyone thought that?