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Author Topic: Early Decision = No Advantage?  (Read 8701 times)

StrawberryRed89

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Early Decision = No Advantage?
« on: May 23, 2007, 05:40:23 PM »
Hey, guys.  This is my 1st time posting here, and I tried to search previous posts, but apparently there's no search function  ???  Anyway, quick question...I know that when applying for undergrad, ED is a big advantage.  I was looking at the NYU Law School site, though, and it said "candidates who apply under the binding Early Decision option are at no competitive advantage in the admissions process."  So what's the point of ED?

countbizaller

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Re: Early Decision = No Advantage?
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2007, 07:01:40 PM »
The search function is actually on the home page near the bottom.

And as far as the early decision goes, there's not an advantage competition wise.  By that I mean that someone doesn't stand a greater risk of getting rejected if they do regular decision as opposed to early decision. 

They do however stand a greater chance of getting waitlisted or getting no money if they opt to do regular.  Early decision just means that if you're good enough to get accepted, you stand a much better chance of actually getting a seat in the fall.
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just call me elle

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Re: Early Decision = No Advantage?
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2007, 07:15:50 PM »
i don't think it matters the same way as undergrad - they still have to report your numbers, etc., so if you're not good enough to make the cut ED won't really help that.

Nart

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Re: Early Decision = No Advantage?
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2007, 02:17:57 PM »
I agree with the last two posts.  If you've got the numbers you'll get in earlier.  If not, you'll just be waitlisted/deferred/rejected earlier in the cycle.

But it's better to apply early then late, so I'd say apply early if you can, but watch out of those that have binding admissions if accepted early.

RollerOfBigCigars

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Re: Early Decision = No Advantage?
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2007, 02:38:11 PM »
There's no question it's better to apply early rather than late in most circumstances. I guess the question about ED would be something like this: Do 2 people with the similar numbers and the same complete date have equal chances if one is ED and the other not? 

Nart

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Re: Early Decision = No Advantage?
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2007, 02:43:15 PM »
There's no question it's better to apply early rather than late in most circumstances. I guess the question about ED would be something like this: Do 2 people with the similar numbers and the same complete date have equal chances if one is ED and the other not? 

If the school does rolling admissions, I say yes. More spots are open earlier right?

countbizaller

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Re: Early Decision = No Advantage?
« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2007, 03:44:53 PM »
I would think of it in terms of "not getting rejected."  Either decision deadline offers no advantage over the other in terms of not getting rejected.

Early admissions however offers a greater chance of getting accepted, which really means a better chance of getting a seat in the fall since the majority of offers probably haven't been made yet.  Regular decision poses a greater possibility of getting waitlisted because of all the offers made to early decision applicants.
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RollerOfBigCigars

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Re: Early Decision = No Advantage?
« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2007, 04:15:54 PM »
Quote
Early admissions however offers a greater chance of getting accepted, which really means a better chance of getting a seat in the fall since the majority of offers probably haven't been made yet.  Regular decision poses a greater possibility of getting waitlisted because of all the offers made to early decision applicants.

But someone can apply for regular decision at the same time that others apply for early decision. they could get reviewed on the same day even, and therefore have the same number of openings in the class available to them.

RollerOfBigCigars

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Re: Early Decision = No Advantage?
« Reply #8 on: May 24, 2007, 04:18:07 PM »
Quote
Quote from: RollerOfBigCigars on Today at 02:38:11 PM
There's no question it's better to apply early rather than late in most circumstances. I guess the question about ED would be something like this: Do 2 people with the similar numbers and the same complete date have equal chances if one is ED and the other not? 


If the school does rolling admissions, I say yes. More spots are open earlier right?

I'm not sure you understood my question. Both students would apply at the same time and therefore have the same number of openings available. Their only difference would be one's contract to come if admitted, as opposed to the other's lack of commitment and possibility to hurt their yield.

DDBY

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Re: Early Decision = No Advantage?
« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2007, 04:39:07 PM »
Quote
Quote from: RollerOfBigCigars on Today at 02:38:11 PM
There's no question it's better to apply early rather than late in most circumstances. I guess the question about ED would be something like this: Do 2 people with the similar numbers and the same complete date have equal chances if one is ED and the other not? 


If the school does rolling admissions, I say yes. More spots are open earlier right?

I'm not sure you understood my question. Both students would apply at the same time and therefore have the same number of openings available. Their only difference would be one's contract to come if admitted, as opposed to the other's lack of commitment and possibility to hurt their yield.
I still don't understand your question.  I doesn't matter.  The decisions are so unscientific, and random.  There really is no way of knowing what the results will be. I got into to school a and waitlisted at b while a friend of mine got into b and waitlisted at a.  Yes, No it doesn't make any sense ... HTH have fun.