Law School Discussion

How are increases in tuition going to affect law schools?

How are increases in tuition going to affect law schools?
« on: May 23, 2007, 11:16:46 AM »
I've been browsing http://www.ilrg.com/rankings/law/index.php/1/desc/State/2007 , which has tuition fees for 2004 and comparing them with the latest online edition of USNews, and it's really frightening. Many schools are raising tuition by over 1k a year, and some by over 2k.

Will tuition raises ever slow down? What schools are being hurt the most by this, and do you think it will affect the rankings? Many t3 and t4 private schools are already 30k+. In five years they will probably be over 40k, and their graduates most likely wont start with higher  salaries than they do now.

Will less people go to law school, or will they just bend over and take it up the A$$?

Amy Winehouse

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Re: How are increases in tuition going to affect law schools?
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2007, 02:18:41 PM »
I've been browsing http://www.ilrg.com/rankings/law/index.php/1/desc/State/2007 , which has tuition fees for 2004 and comparing them with the latest online edition of USNews, and it's really frightening. Many schools are raising tuition by over 1k a year, and some by over 2k.

Will tuition raises ever slow down? What schools are being hurt the most by this, and do you think it will affect the rankings? Many t3 and t4 private schools are already 30k+. In five years they will probably be over 40k, and their graduates most likely wont start with higher  salaries than they do now.

Will fewer people go to law school, or will they just bend over and take it up the A$$?

1-2% per year actually isn't that bad if you estimate that inflation is about 3%.  My undergrad raised tuition by 6.5% every year I was there, resulting in a net increase of about 8k over 4 years.  Blargh.  Oh yes, people will continue to take it up the a** because it is a luxury and people are still under the delusion that a JD = wealth without limit.

I'd bet that salaries 3 years from now will be higher than they are now if for no other reason than to keep up with cost of living.  I doubt law schools will ever price themselves out of the market.   


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Re: How are increases in tuition going to affect law schools?
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2007, 02:36:58 PM »
Hmm, my undergrad tuition was about $50 per semester :p

Amy Winehouse

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Re: How are increases in tuition going to affect law schools?
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2007, 02:39:49 PM »
Hmm, my undergrad tuition was about $50 per semester :p

jealous  :(
Did you go to school in Europe?  Germany, perhaps?

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Re: How are increases in tuition going to affect law schools?
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2007, 02:48:22 PM »
Yes, no, Norway

Re: How are increases in tuition going to affect law schools?
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2007, 02:49:29 PM »
law schools have priced themselves out for some folks like myself. For instance, I don't think I'll be going to Case Western because it is too expensive.

It's all supply and demand, despite all of the carping by university officials about the rising cost of-- everything. Costs are rising for businesses everywhere and they aren't raising prices as much as universities are. Truth is, demand is strong, and it will remain strong for the forseeable future.

And let's admit it, outside of fields like engineering, chemistry, biology, physics, statistics, mathematics, etc, college curriculum does very little to prepare you for the working world. I've seen many arguments about how an education in the humanities prepares you for the work world by learning manners and turning in work on time, but those are secondary properties.

Companies hire college graduates because they can, not because college really teaches you anything that you couldn't learn from the 6-week on-the-job training.

Re: How are increases in tuition going to affect law schools?
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2007, 02:51:19 PM »
a particularly pernicious effect is that... well, since the 1960's the ABA has worked to increase the supply of lawyers, while at the same time the cost of law school has shot up. The net effect: more lawyers with fewer job opportunities and more debt.

Brett McKay

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Re: How are increases in tuition going to affect law schools?
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2007, 03:41:34 PM »
a particularly pernicious effect is that... well, since the 1960's the ABA has worked to increase the supply of lawyers, while at the same time the cost of law school has shot up. The net effect: more lawyers with fewer job opportunities and more debt.

I agree. I also think there's an over-saturation of law schools. Take where I live, Oklahoma. Although Oklahoma is a relatively small state, we have THREE law schools. (There was a time when there were four, but thankfully Oral Roberts went bankrupt and had to sell it.)

Finding a job in OK has become extremely difficult for graduates. One of the schools needs to go.

Re: How are increases in tuition going to affect law schools?
« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2007, 04:00:04 PM »
I've been browsing http://www.ilrg.com/rankings/law/index.php/1/desc/State/2007 , which has tuition fees for 2004 and comparing them with the latest online edition of USNews, and it's really frightening. Many schools are raising tuition by over 1k a year, and some by over 2k.

Will tuition raises ever slow down? What schools are being hurt the most by this, and do you think it will affect the rankings? Many t3 and t4 private schools are already 30k+. In five years they will probably be over 40k, and their graduates most likely wont start with higher  salaries than they do now.

Will fewer people go to law school, or will they just bend over and take it up the A$$?

1-2% per year actually isn't that bad if you estimate that inflation is about 3%.  My undergrad raised tuition by 6.5% every year I was there, resulting in a net increase of about 8k over 4 years.  Blargh.  Oh yes, people will continue to take it up the a** because it is a luxury and people are still under the delusion that a JD = wealth without limit.

I'd bet that salaries 3 years from now will be higher than they are now if for no other reason than to keep up with cost of living.  I doubt law schools will ever price themselves out of the market.   



What is this 1-2% about? Law schools raising their tuition by 2k is usually way more than 2%. I wouldnt be so sure that salaries will increase because the legal field is most likely still going to be over-saturated. Most people aren't concerned about an extra 20-30k of debt (they should be if they arent going to a top school) when they are thinking about law school. If law schools on average were 10k higher per year than they are now, my mindset would be "well, if this is what I have to pay, then I have to pay it. Nothing I can do about it." May not be the appropriate attitude, but I'm sure many think the same way.

I don't think supply and demand is going to prevent that many people from pursuing law degrees. Everyone thinks they are going to be at the top of their class and land a great job.

Re: How are increases in tuition going to affect law schools?
« Reply #9 on: May 23, 2007, 07:32:53 PM »
For Virginia schools, the increase may range from 8%-15%.  I assume these numbers are similar across the nation as well as the range isn't too wild.