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Author Topic: 'Charged' for a crime  (Read 477 times)

ě

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'Charged' for a crime
« on: May 18, 2007, 10:12:22 AM »
Seeing that legal terms aren't the same globally, could someone give me a solid definition of what it means to be charged for a crime (thinking of the context of law school apps and ABA rules etc). I have been questioned as a suspect in a criminal case, but the police dropped the case due to lack of evidence. Was I charged? Or are you only charged when the DA decides to make it formal?

Thistle

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Re: 'Charged' for a crime
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2007, 10:14:22 AM »
Seeing that legal terms aren't the same globally, could someone give me a solid definition of what it means to be charged for a crime (thinking of the context of law school apps and ABA rules etc). I have been questioned as a suspect in a criminal case, but the police dropped the case due to lack of evidence. Was I charged? Or are you only charged when the DA decides to make it formal?

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Re: 'Charged' for a crime
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2007, 10:17:06 AM »
As an expert 'Law and Order' watcher, I think you're only charged with a crime if you're placed under arrest and arraigned in front of a judge.  

Of course if Jack McCoy is your ADA, you're screwed.

But yeah, in reality, I don't think you were charged.  If I were you, I might talk to a lawyer though.  But then again, I'm a nervous nellie with regards to these things.
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John Blackthorne

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Re: 'Charged' for a crime
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2007, 10:26:40 AM »
Seeing that legal terms aren't the same globally, could someone give me a solid definition of what it means to be charged for a crime (thinking of the context of law school apps and ABA rules etc). I have been questioned as a suspect in a criminal case, but the police dropped the case due to lack of evidence. Was I charged? Or are you only charged when the DA decides to make it formal?

I'm certain that you were (and still are) guilty.  But, no, you were not charged.
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ě

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Re: 'Charged' for a crime
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2007, 10:28:31 AM »
As a matter of fact, I was "guilty", although it was as justifiable as it gets.

Well, this is the same impression I got, but as you say, it was largely based on Law & Order, not reality :) Also, Norwegian police records are sealed, unless convicted, so I also doubt that even if I had been charged, the ABA or the AALS would be able to find out... But I kinda expect disclosure is better than getting screwed over 5 years down the line.

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Re: 'Charged' for a crime
« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2007, 10:28:40 AM »
Seeing that legal terms aren't the same globally, could someone give me a solid definition of what it means to be charged for a crime (thinking of the context of law school apps and ABA rules etc). I have been questioned as a suspect in a criminal case, but the police dropped the case due to lack of evidence. Was I charged? Or are you only charged when the DA decides to make it formal?

I'm certain that you were (and still are) guilty.  But, no, you were not charged.

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