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Author Topic: law student, just got done with 1L, taking questions  (Read 5600 times)

kirkcameronsgf

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Re: law student, just got done with 1L, taking questions
« Reply #70 on: May 15, 2007, 11:33:56 PM »
I'm definetly a marathoner.

That approach would make me nervous.  I'm jealous of anyone that can do that.  I'm not quite confident enough in my abilities to do it like that.  Kudos to you, ---.

I have heard, however, not to brief, but rather to highlight with different color highlighters representing different things in the case (i don't have the list right now, see Law School Confidential for the actual thing).  Do any of the 1L's think this would be beneficial?

bros

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Re: law student, just got done with 1L, taking questions
« Reply #71 on: May 15, 2007, 11:51:48 PM »
I'm definetly a marathoner.

That approach would make me nervous.  I'm jealous of anyone that can do that.  I'm not quite confident enough in my abilities to do it like that.  Kudos to you, ---.

I have heard, however, not to brief, but rather to highlight with different color highlighters representing different things in the case (i don't have the list right now, see Law School Confidential for the actual thing).  Do any of the 1L's think this would be beneficial?

i went from briefing every case to just underlining a little bit after i got used to getting called on. both work fine, but i would start out briefing every case until you really get a feel for how your prof works.

thelawfool

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Re: law student, just got done with 1L, taking questions
« Reply #72 on: May 16, 2007, 12:38:01 AM »
Okay.  Here's a different perspective that worked out just fine for me. 

I go to Temple, which is ranked 60 now, I think.  Some 1L sections this year were more competitive than others.  Mine was viewed as the most studious, but not the most competitive.

I think that the marathon approach, suggested by a one above, wouldn't work for me.

So, here's what I did:

1) Just feel out your profs during the first few weeks of the semester.  Read enough of the material to not look like an ass, but that's enough.  Don't brief--just mark the rule(s) and the holding(s) in the margin.
2) About a month in, draft up a skeleton outline of the class. Lose it.
3) For the next two months, read less if the prof's style allows, more if otherwise.
4) Stop reading for the last two weeks.  Spend the last two weeks and the week(ish) reading period writing your outlines, reviewing them with a study group, and discussing old exam questions.  Use old outlines to fill gaps in your own; use E&E to get the big picture when it escapes you.

This method requires about 10 hours outside of class during the semester and 60 hours per week during the three weeks before the exam.  This is the sprint approach.  Ask yourself, "Am I a marathoner or a sprinter?"



honestly, these approaches aren't cookie cutter.  it all depends on your professor. 

1) some professors will know that you are book briefing during your first semester and call you out in class for it.  then you will obviously start briefing cases to avoid the wrath.
2) some professors will teach important stuff toward the end of the semester and you can't just stop paying attention (imagine if products liability is the last topic in torts...you can't just stop reading)
3) some professors will continue with the socratic method until the end of the semester.  what do you do if you aren't prepared for class?
4) again, some professors appreciate seeing some of their lectures on the exam.
5) briefing helps in class while you are taking notes.  i found that filling in my briefs with class notes (in a different color on one note) to be helpful in making my end of semester outlines.  putting in the teacher's perspective on certain cases might get you some brownie points.

thus, while these approaches work for the individual student, they might not work for you.  regarding practice tests, there is no need to look at these until the exam reading period.  this is why you can't fall behind.  there is no time to "learn" material during the week-ish period.  you should be doing your outlines and taking practice tests leading up to each exam.

good luck!
FIU Class of 2009

Jackie Chiles, ESQ.

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Re: law student, just got done with 1L, taking questions
« Reply #73 on: May 16, 2007, 02:04:39 AM »
Okay.  Here's a different perspective that worked out just fine for me. 

I go to Temple, which is ranked 60 now, I think.  Some 1L sections this year were more competitive than others.  Mine was viewed as the most studious, but not the most competitive.

I think that the marathon approach, suggested by a one above, wouldn't work for me.

So, here's what I did:

1) Just feel out your profs during the first few weeks of the semester.  Read enough of the material to not look like an ass, but that's enough.  Don't brief--just mark the rule(s) and the holding(s) in the margin.
2) About a month in, draft up a skeleton outline of the class. Lose it.
3) For the next two months, read less if the prof's style allows, more if otherwise.
4) Stop reading for the last two weeks.  Spend the last two weeks and the week(ish) reading period writing your outlines, reviewing them with a study group, and discussing old exam questions.  Use old outlines to fill gaps in your own; use E&E to get the big picture when it escapes you.

This method requires about 10 hours outside of class during the semester and 60 hours per week during the three weeks before the exam.  This is the sprint approach.  Ask yourself, "Am I a marathoner or a sprinter?"



honestly, these approaches aren't cookie cutter.  it all depends on your professor. 

1) some professors will know that you are book briefing during your first semester and call you out in class for it.  then you will obviously start briefing cases to avoid the wrath.
2) some professors will teach important stuff toward the end of the semester and you can't just stop paying attention (imagine if products liability is the last topic in torts...you can't just stop reading)
3) some professors will continue with the socratic method until the end of the semester.  what do you do if you aren't prepared for class?
4) again, some professors appreciate seeing some of their lectures on the exam.
5) briefing helps in class while you are taking notes.  i found that filling in my briefs with class notes (in a different color on one note) to be helpful in making my end of semester outlines.  putting in the teacher's perspective on certain cases might get you some brownie points.

thus, while these approaches work for the individual student, they might not work for you.  regarding practice tests, there is no need to look at these until the exam reading period.  this is why you can't fall behind.  there is no time to "learn" material during the week-ish period.  you should be doing your outlines and taking practice tests leading up to each exam.

good luck!

ok here is what i have wondered - this goes for anyone who is done with their 1st year . . .

how many pages is it per night? for example torts - for the next class, how many cases/pages are assigned to be discussed next time?

also - when you say breif each case, this is basically a one-two page summary of facts,holding, decision, parties to refresh your memory later on? do teachers ever ask to see these?

Pmass322

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Re: law student, just got done with 1L, taking questions
« Reply #74 on: May 16, 2007, 02:21:08 AM »
Quote
ok here is what i have wondered - this goes for anyone who is done with their 1st year . . .

how many pages is it per night? for example torts - for the next class, how many cases/pages are assigned to be discussed next time?

also - when you say breif each case, this is basically a one-two page summary of facts,holding, decision, parties to refresh your memory later on? do teachers ever ask to see these?

The number of pages of reading per class can vary greatly, but I would say on average it's 10-20 pages with 2-3 cases.  A brief is generally what you describe, but unless the case is lengthy, it should be limited to 1 page.  I have never heard of a professor asking to see a brief and there is no rule that you MUST do them.  Professors, however, will ask many questions in class related to what would be in a brief; therefore, briefs are a great way to prepare for class.  At my school, most students switched to book-briefing by the middle of the first semester.  I stuck with the traditional briefing because I found it immensely more helpful in preparing for class and exams.  However, some people find briefing to be a waste of time, and do well in class and on exams without traditional briefing.  It is all about finding what study methods work best for you.
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Jackie Chiles, ESQ.

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Re: law student, just got done with 1L, taking questions
« Reply #75 on: May 16, 2007, 09:40:33 AM »
Quote
ok here is what i have wondered - this goes for anyone who is done with their 1st year . . .

how many pages is it per night? for example torts - for the next class, how many cases/pages are assigned to be discussed next time?

also - when you say breif each case, this is basically a one-two page summary of facts,holding, decision, parties to refresh your memory later on? do teachers ever ask to see these?

The number of pages of reading per class can vary greatly, but I would say on average it's 10-20 pages with 2-3 cases.  A brief is generally what you describe, but unless the case is lengthy, it should be limited to 1 page.  I have never heard of a professor asking to see a brief and there is no rule that you MUST do them.  Professors, however, will ask many questions in class related to what would be in a brief; therefore, briefs are a great way to prepare for class.  At my school, most students switched to book-briefing by the middle of the first semester.  I stuck with the traditional briefing because I found it immensely more helpful in preparing for class and exams.  However, some people find briefing to be a waste of time, and do well in class and on exams without traditional briefing.  It is all about finding what study methods work best for you.

what is book briefing?

Pmass322

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Re: law student, just got done with 1L, taking questions
« Reply #76 on: May 16, 2007, 09:51:07 AM »
Book briefing is labeling (usually through highlighting with a designated color) the portions of the case which represent the issue, holding, rationale, etc. right in the casebook.
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Towelie

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Re: law student, just got done with 1L, taking questions
« Reply #77 on: May 16, 2007, 10:33:57 AM »
Book briefing is labeling (usually through highlighting with a designated color) the portions of the case which represent the issue, holding, rationale, etc. right in the casebook.

That's what I do. It doesn't really affect resale value either. I used to write out briefs but it really isn't worth the time. I would reccomend finding that out for yourself, though, since I do think it was helpful to start law school by doing traditional briefs.
Penn Law '09

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Re: law student, just got done with 1L, taking questions
« Reply #78 on: May 16, 2007, 10:40:51 AM »
1L experiences differ greatly, so take a lot of what is said in this thread with a grain of salt.  Based on my experience, I would heartily disagree with much of the advice given, and yet I have no doubt that it is good advice for people in other situations.
Just another 2L.

Towelie

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Re: law student, just got done with 1L, taking questions
« Reply #79 on: May 16, 2007, 11:18:53 AM »
1L experiences differ greatly, so take a lot of what is said in this thread with a grain of salt.  Based on my experience, I would heartily disagree with much of the advice given, and yet I have no doubt that it is good advice for people in other situations.

Welcome back!
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