Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: how to work on writing before the law school starts?  (Read 1289 times)

tuya

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
    • Email
how to work on writing before the law school starts?
« on: May 13, 2007, 09:35:09 PM »
Hello

I will start at the UC Hastings in a few months, and since I was raised overseas, I am very worried about my writing skills. How can I try to improve it? Shall I sign for some writing classes at a local community college?

We have DVC nearby in the East Bay.

Thank you!

ohwellok

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 209
  • the cutest beagle in the whole wide world!
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: how to work on writing before the law school starts?
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2007, 11:01:29 PM »
i would say don't worry about it. when i started law school, i had to learn to write all over again. the type of writing i learned as an undergrad was actually not beneficial to me at all. so, you actually may benefit from not having a writing background. also, law schools typically accept people from all backgrounds - they don't just want folks that have a background in writing heavy courses in undergrad. i think you'll be fine.

Hank Rearden

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8615
  • Zurich is stained
    • View Profile
Re: how to work on writing before the law school starts?
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2007, 11:24:27 PM »
I've heard that about how the style of writing in college is different from that in law school.  While that may be true, being able to use commas correctly and knowing the difference between "who" and "whom" can only help.  If you've been in an environment where you didn't have to know that sort of thing, brushing up would be a good idea I think. 
CLS '10

The appropriateness of Perpetua would probably depend on the tone of the writing.  When I used it, I (half playfully) thought the extra space made the words sort of resonate.

Hank Rearden

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8615
  • Zurich is stained
    • View Profile
Re: how to work on writing before the law school starts?
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2007, 11:26:15 PM »
I've heard that about how the style of writing in college is different from that in law school.  While that may be true, being able to use commas correctly and knowing the difference between "who" and "whom" can only help.  If you've been in an environment where you didn't have to know that sort of thing, brushing up would be a good idea I think. 

I don't think ANYONE knows how to use commas correctly. Its a mythical skill.

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/prelaw/index.php?action=profile;u=10840
CLS '10

The appropriateness of Perpetua would probably depend on the tone of the writing.  When I used it, I (half playfully) thought the extra space made the words sort of resonate.

TeresaPinfold

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 658
    • View Profile
Re: how to work on writing before the law school starts?
« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2007, 11:27:45 PM »
"I will start at UC Hastings in a few months and, since I was raised overseas, I am very worried about my writing skills. How can I try to improve them? Should I sign up for some writing classes at a local community college?"

That one's free.

Hank Rearden

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8615
  • Zurich is stained
    • View Profile
Re: how to work on writing before the law school starts?
« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2007, 11:30:12 PM »
"I will start at UC Hastings in a few months and, since I was raised overseas, I am very worried about my writing skills. How can I try to improve them? Should I sign up for some writing classes at a local community college?"

That one's free.


The comma should be after "months," not after "and." 
CLS '10

The appropriateness of Perpetua would probably depend on the tone of the writing.  When I used it, I (half playfully) thought the extra space made the words sort of resonate.

Lampshade Punk

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1010
  • "Even in the quietest moments."
    • View Profile
Re: how to work on writing before the law school starts?
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2007, 01:02:20 AM »
"I will start at UC Hastings in a few months and, since I was raised overseas, I am very worried about my writing skills. How can I try to improve them? Should I sign up for some writing classes at a local community college?"

That one's free.


The comma should be after "months," not after "and." 

true story. 

TeresaPinfold

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 658
    • View Profile
Re: how to work on writing before the law school starts?
« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2007, 01:16:31 AM »
"I will start at UC Hastings in a few months and, since I was raised overseas, I am very worried about my writing skills. How can I try to improve them? Should I sign up for some writing classes at a local community college?"

That one's free.


The comma should be after "months," not after "and." 
Technically commas belong in both places, the first to separate independent clauses, the second to set off a parenthetical phrase, but usually one is dropped for reasons of fluidity. It seems "The Elements of Style" would choose yours, so I guess I was searching too eagerly for things to change.

Hank Rearden

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8615
  • Zurich is stained
    • View Profile
Re: how to work on writing before the law school starts?
« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2007, 01:19:39 AM »
"I will start at UC Hastings in a few months and, since I was raised overseas, I am very worried about my writing skills. How can I try to improve them? Should I sign up for some writing classes at a local community college?"

That one's free.


The comma should be after "months," not after "and." 
Technically commas belong in both places, the first to separate independent clauses, the second to set off a parenthetical phrase, but usually one is dropped for reasons of fluidity. It seems "The Elements of Style" would choose yours, so I guess I was searching too eagerly for things to change.

That's where it becomes hazy.  Sometimes the comma is optional.  Sometimes it is not.  The comma after "months" should be there, but the other one is optional and does disrupt the flow, and IMO you shouldn't include optional commas when they disrupt flow. 
CLS '10

The appropriateness of Perpetua would probably depend on the tone of the writing.  When I used it, I (half playfully) thought the extra space made the words sort of resonate.

.zone.

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 581
    • View Profile
Re: how to work on writing before the law school starts?
« Reply #9 on: May 14, 2007, 01:45:56 AM »
"I will start at UC Hastings in a few months and, since I was raised overseas, I am very worried about my writing skills. How can I try to improve them? Should I sign up for some writing classes at a local community college?"

That one's free.


The comma should be after "months," not after "and." 
Technically commas belong in both places, the first to separate independent clauses, the second to set off a parenthetical phrase, but usually one is dropped for reasons of fluidity. It seems "The Elements of Style" would choose yours, so I guess I was searching too eagerly for things to change.

That's where it becomes hazy.  Sometimes the comma is optional.  Sometimes it is not.  The comma after "months" should be there, but the other one is optional and does disrupt the flow, and IMO you shouldn't include optional commas when they disrupt flow. 

But I like both commas.  >:(