Law School Discussion

"academic steroids" in law school?

Chibundu

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Re: "academic steroids" in law school?
« Reply #30 on: May 10, 2007, 09:22:45 AM »
tag

Re: "academic steroids" in law school?
« Reply #31 on: May 10, 2007, 09:38:40 AM »

Actually, the bar, as an administrative committee (and state actor), is subject to the constraints of procedural due process. You'll learn about this in both civ pro and con law next year. If someone "rats you out" you have the right to know 1) who did it, 2)exactly what they allege (the charges brought against you), and 3) you have the right to meaningfully be heard in your own defense or behalf. This applies any time the state (ie, the bar), threatens your life, liberty, or property interests (I'd probably call this property, but it's up for debate). Private school honor committees might not be held to the same rigid standards, but most voluntarily follow this, because well, we're lawyers and believe due process is a good thing.

That said (and not directly related or aimed at the above quote), I wouldn't and don't use ritalin, but if I did, good luck trying to get me in trouble for it-snitching won't get you many brownie points from other attorneys or clients.

Well, I'll definitely defer to you on that point, but as I mentioned they would still be observing due process of law if they questioned you regarding such an accusation, correct?

Then the applicant is in the thorny situation of admitting to what could be construed as an untreated chemical dependency, or denying it. (lying to the bar examination board--even if you are 100% sure you will get away with it, do you want to have to do that?)

I doubt anyone has ever been denied admission for precisely this situation, but it's not impossible.

Reesespbcup

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Re: "academic steroids" in law school?
« Reply #32 on: May 10, 2007, 10:06:37 AM »
OK I took Adderall twice and it did NOTHING to me. Am I strange?

Re: "academic steroids" in law school?
« Reply #33 on: May 10, 2007, 10:12:05 AM »
Hmm, I was just diagnosed with ADD this week, and since law school is approaching next year I'm very confused about what to do about it. I understand my doctors can offer the best advice for this, but I was curious to hear from people who have actually gone through it also.

 I managed throughout college and have never used a stimulant (other than caffeine while studying..tho not even caffeine on the LSAT).  However, I feel like my GPA could have been more like a 3.9 and not a 3.5 if I had been able to study or concentrate on a paper for more than 5 or 10 minutes at a time. I'm just getting really overwhelmed with trying to cope with school, etc. I really wish that I had gotten diagnosed before undergrad. Apparently when I was little my family took me to two different doctors to figure out what was going on, but they didn't diagnose non-hyperactive girls with no behavior problems and good grades.

While this post is way too personal for my tastes, I was wondering if anyone who has had ADD/ADHD throughout undergrad or law school could comment on strategies to deal with it.  How effective is medication compared to being non-medicated, etc?

Re: "academic steroids" in law school?
« Reply #34 on: May 10, 2007, 12:15:48 PM »
Just a quick compare and contrast.

Steroids for athletic enhancement = big contract
Downside:  small nuts

Mind Enhancing drugs for Exam studying = helps concentrate really hard on something you'll probably fail anyway

Downside:   your lack of courage to face it like everyone else
             (aka small nuts)

Gobble 36mg of Concerta and you can plan on not having your libido for the day. I have ADD and was prescribed concerta but take it only when need be because of the sides that come with it.






Re: "academic steroids" in law school?
« Reply #35 on: May 10, 2007, 12:32:13 PM »
I like to use cocaine every day.

Thistle

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Re: "academic steroids" in law school?
« Reply #36 on: May 10, 2007, 12:51:55 PM »
Hmm, I was just diagnosed with ADD this week, and since law school is approaching next year I'm very confused about what to do about it. I understand my doctors can offer the best advice for this, but I was curious to hear from people who have actually gone through it also.

 I managed throughout college and have never used a stimulant (other than caffeine while studying..tho not even caffeine on the LSAT).  However, I feel like my GPA could have been more like a 3.9 and not a 3.5 if I had been able to study or concentrate on a paper for more than 5 or 10 minutes at a time. I'm just getting really overwhelmed with trying to cope with school, etc. I really wish that I had gotten diagnosed before undergrad. Apparently when I was little my family took me to two different doctors to figure out what was going on, but they didn't diagnose non-hyperactive girls with no behavior problems and good grades.

While this post is way too personal for my tastes, I was wondering if anyone who has had ADD/ADHD throughout undergrad or law school could comment on strategies to deal with it.  How effective is medication compared to being non-medicated, etc?


yeah, i have it, but i dont medicate.  however, once you get to law school, go immediately to disability services with your med records, and get the time and a half accommodation for test taking.  you wont regret it, trust me

Re: "academic steroids" in law school?
« Reply #37 on: May 10, 2007, 12:52:22 PM »
Hmm, I was just diagnosed with ADD this week, and since law school is approaching next year I'm very confused about what to do about it. I understand my doctors can offer the best advice for this, but I was curious to hear from people who have actually gone through it also.

 I managed throughout college and have never used a stimulant (other than caffeine while studying..tho not even caffeine on the LSAT).  However, I feel like my GPA could have been more like a 3.9 and not a 3.5 if I had been able to study or concentrate on a paper for more than 5 or 10 minutes at a time. I'm just getting really overwhelmed with trying to cope with school, etc. I really wish that I had gotten diagnosed before undergrad. Apparently when I was little my family took me to two different doctors to figure out what was going on, but they didn't diagnose non-hyperactive girls with no behavior problems and good grades.

While this post is way too personal for my tastes, I was wondering if anyone who has had ADD/ADHD throughout undergrad or law school could comment on strategies to deal with it.  How effective is medication compared to being non-medicated, etc?

The best advice with adderall is to start long before school, and let it build up in your system. Some people don't react very well to it at first (e.g. insomnia, skin crawling, can't eat, etc.), and you don't want to add a bad reaction to the stress of the first week at school. Also, don't skip doses even if you hate how it makes you feel--you'll regret it.

There are more add/hd drugs than just adderall out now.   There is strattera (non stimulant based).  What you really need to do is just go to your dr. and discuss various options.  Adderall does not have this black box warning just for the heck of it, there are side effects, so again the pros and the cons need to be considered.

Journeyman

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Re: "academic steroids" in law school?
« Reply #38 on: May 10, 2007, 03:59:16 PM »


Are we the future leaders of America or cross country truckers?


Which one pays more?   :D

CavemanLawyer

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Re: "academic steroids" in law school?
« Reply #39 on: May 10, 2007, 04:18:54 PM »
Either you're a serious gunner already who believes in natural law, or you have no idea how laws are made and the political reasons behind them in the first place. Personally, I don't put the "law" up on a high shelf to not break- not to say that I break the law intentionally- but I live according to my own morals and values. If they conflict with the law, that's a risk I'm willing to take to stand up for what I believe in. Law is politically, socially, and morally motivated, and it's up to each person to determine which laws they choose to break.

Here is a typical oath that one must uphold and hold dear to their hearts to have the requisite fitness of character to practice law:

"No person shall be deemed admitted to the bar until he shall have taken an oath to the effect that he will support, obey, and defend the constitution of the United States, and the constitution and laws of this state, and that he will faithfully and honestly and to the best of his ability discharge the duties of an attorney and counselor-at-law."
Wyoming Code 33-5-112

It appears that you are not willing or able to do so, and this makes you lack the fitness to practice law in my own opinion and most likely the opinion of the overwhelming majority of Bar Examiners.