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Author Topic: The Black Men Thread  (Read 111478 times)

blk_reign

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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #90 on: May 10, 2007, 04:56:16 PM »
Yes WOW he made Harvard Law Review… although I didn’t mention that in my comment.. let’s not downplay that ish… we (black folk) haven’t come that far with legal education to act as if that is not a huge  accomplishment for a black man…

Of course he’s in the pursuit of the US Presidency.. that’s basic common sense all things considered.. I haven’t said one word about him chasing social justice…I said that standing in a corner with a bullhorn isn’t going to evoke any change.. We have to take action in that regard… grassroots organizations… nonprofits.. yes they’re playing their part as well in the community and on the streets but it isn’t going to affect the majority in the long run.. I think that a lot of blacks have a view that “we must take care of we” screw everyone else.. and clearly that isn’t the way that the world (more specifically the US) operates.. it’s one of the reasons that as a culture we’re lacking in the strides that we’re making.. it’s all a matter of perspective… once we stop looking for a Black people’s president.. or a black people’s leader we can truly start doing some things..

And seriously… I mean seriously (having a grey’s anatomy moment) Barack is a husband and a father 1st and with family being a priority he’s not going to radically get himself killed trying to save his community...we’re always trying to lay all of our burdens on someone to lead us to the promise land.. to equality…

we all have a role..

Obama clearly feels that politics is his- and I’m not going to knock that at all….

I seriously doubt that Obama will win (and I tend to keep my political views off of this board as I don’t have the time or desire to take it there lol) however I am not going to sit here and place the plight of black America on one man sorry… I’d much rather do what I need to do with the help of others in and outside of my community than look for others to “fix it” for me….


Well obama is a politican..and the fact he missed the state of the black union address to cater to "white folk" who are behind him makes me slam him..he is a sell out...and yes it is selling out when rather then doing what is best for your community you play the politics of mass appeal. THere is no "changing the system from within" in D.C.  I don't care what his accomplishments were in law school. Alan Dershowitz is argubaly a much more distinguished legal scholar then him I respect his as a law student  but he would never get my vote... but enough of me talking I will let Cornel West break it down for yall :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HXj3_pjTTwg

P.S.

Baracks got the "mariah carey" syndrome..only black when it is necessary  ::)


Plenty of people take action for social justice. I've seen activism in most of my undergraduate education. I've been to plenty of organized events with people from a variety of ages, races, income backgrounds, etc advocating stances which I have not seen Obama advocate. These people to me have a much better direction of where the country can go versus Obama, Clinton, Edwards, etc. If the game is dirty then don't play it transcend it..social movements are not built based on electoral votes but on organizing people behind issues..and personally  Barack is just to centrist for my political radar. He is a politican? yes.. articulate? yes  educated? yes.. charasmatic? yes... (and wow he made harvard law review) but he is far to reformist for my taste, he is not revolutionary, he doesn't have the zeal which I believe is needed for radical change..in the end all I see is someone who tries to please everybody and change will come at a destructive compromise. That is not my approach nor the approach of those I look up too.  Radical views may not "pay the bills" but it can change a country. I think radicalism is what this country needs rather then the constant ensuring of the status quo.  (which includes getting a "black man" into Airforce one  as if that is some sort of achievment for all black people.  Obama is not the political leader I would ask black people to support because in the end he has to cater to other peoples intrest.

Bottom line you don't have to be in electoral politics to make change and just the fact that he went on a path towards the executive branch already shows he has compromised a lot. He is not in  the pursuit of social justice, he is in pursuit of the U.S. presidency.
We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...

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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #91 on: May 10, 2007, 05:05:37 PM »
Yes WOW he made Harvard Law Review… although I didn’t mention that in my comment.. let’s not downplay that ish… we (black folk) haven’t come that far with legal education to act as if that is not a huge  accomplishment for a black man…

Of course he’s in the pursuit of the US Presidency.. that’s basic common sense all things considered..



Thank you. Can a brother get some friggin props around here?  For you newbies, I don't quite think you realize what an accomplishment that is for any law student period, let alone a black law student surrounded by a sea of "you stole my seat you undeserving affirmative action porch monkey" law students.

You'll see when you get here.  Law School is on a whole other level. If you can make it here, you can make it anywhere. Believe that.
"A lawyer's either a social engineer or a parasite on society. A social engineer is a highly skilled...lawyer who understands the Constitution of the U.S. and knows how to explore its uses in the solving of problems of local communities and in bettering [our] conditions."
Charles H. Houston

FrankWhite

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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #92 on: May 10, 2007, 05:06:19 PM »
Oh and what are yall going to do when you graduate? My eventual goal is politics. I'll probably do the corporate thing for a couple years to get some money and experience then hope over to DOJ or something like then. Then I'll work my way up the ranks to become a governor or something.  ;D


Good plan.  I could see myself doing something similar.  Pimping the firm for experience and resources until I branch off and start my own commercial real estate company. I'd like to be a developer.  Perhaps stack some chips and then jump into politics.  Who knows.
[/quote]

Thanks man... yeah I'm trying create that old money for my childrens childrens childrens children..... Of course I also want to dabble in real estate.
Emory Law Class of 2010

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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #93 on: May 10, 2007, 05:13:25 PM »
to bring back the topic of black male role models....

Does anyone remember that comment Rosie O'Donnell made about their not being many black role models and that is why black folk rallied around O.J.?
It is easy to change the language of oppression without changing the sociopolitical situation of its victims.

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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #94 on: May 10, 2007, 05:16:50 PM »
Question to everyone calling Tavis a farce and having negative things to say about a group of black people coming together to talk about issues they deem important: are there any black people doing anything positive to help out our communities?  Or are they all just anonymous grass roots people, or named Barack Obama?

I don't think it's negative, but it is what it is-People talking. It's purely inspirational. No implementable plan for success. Just people talking.

I want to be an idealist for a minute. What if at the next SOBU they actually focused on a specific city like D.C.? Instead of inspirational talk, established goals in education, crime, and economic empowerment for the next year. Lobby for change. Then move on to the next concentration of black people.

How about less talk and more action period...lobbying is fine but lets go one better...how about in the city they choose to discuss they go in and actually make the changes. You know instead of during the back to school rush giving out plastic bookbags and school supplies how about buying some books? I mean it cost them money to fly into the city...find a location, hotels, etc. So how about just going to the community schools not the school board but the principals and with open checkbooks say what do you really need. Then make it happen. How about painting a school over the summer break, buying or repair desk and tables and chairs and broken doors? How about instead of all the pity poor us..why not the empower us. Say fine we will do it ourselves. Like Reign said...Be the change...

I agree with action.  Still, thats asking a bit much for Cornell and Gates to paint schools.  Come on?  is that what they got all those fancy schmancy degrees for?  They are theorists.  If they light a fire under someone watching who is more action oriented, they have done their job.  Someone may cite them as their inspiration, as BPP cited Malcolm X or Frantz Fanon.  really, Malcolm, we know, did alot of talking at places like Oxford etc...and was criticized in his time - and more recently - for merely talking, and was markedly absent from the southern marches.  do we throw him away?  like I read from someone else earlier, and like I truly beleive myself, we all can play a part.  it takes all types.  I just don't see the point of being so critical of guys like West and Smiley, almost like they are no good since they are not organizing or putting in some proleteriate elbow grease. I mean by all means, critique their philosphies or theories or the ideas they put forward.  Don't critique what they do.  Taking that a step forward, where does that lead you? 

As humans we are a very specialized bunch, some people are not "grassroots people".  some people are "ivory tower" people.  In that respect, those guys are doing their jobs.  We can't look at them to take it from the cradle to the grave.  It's a team game.    
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FrankWhite

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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #95 on: May 10, 2007, 05:24:02 PM »
to bring back the topic of black male role models....

Does anyone remember that comment Rosie O'Donnell made about their not being many black role models and that is why black folk rallied around O.J.?

Nah what was that about? Do you have a link?
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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #96 on: May 10, 2007, 05:25:27 PM »
I agree with action.  Still, thats asking a bit much for Cornell and Gates to paint schools.  Come on?  is that what they got all those fancy schmancy degrees for?  They are theorists.  If they light a fire under someone watching who is more action oriented, they have done their job.  Someone may cite them as their inspiration, as BPP cited Malcolm X or Frantz Fanon.  really, Malcolm, we know, did alot of talking at places like Oxford etc...and was criticized in his time - and more recently - for merely talking, and was markedly absent from the southern marches.  do we throw him away?  like I read from someone else earlier, and like I truly beleive myself, we all can play a part.  it takes all types.  I just don't see the point of being so critical of guys like West and Smiley, almost like they are no good since they are not organizing or putting in some proleteriate elbow grease.  As humans we are a very specialized bunch, some people are not "grassroots people".  some people are "ivory tower" people.  In that respect, they are doing their jobs.  We can't look at them to take it from the cradle to the grave.  It's a team game.    

I feel your point. I admire Tavis and Dr. West. I look up to them. However, the SOBU is purely inspirational. There is no plan for change just motivational speaking. I think we make a huge mistake when we look at it as more than that. I'd care about it more if there was some motivational planning.
It is easy to change the language of oppression without changing the sociopolitical situation of its victims.

Justiceforall

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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #97 on: May 10, 2007, 05:38:12 PM »
Alright, how about this for a change of pace

How do you guys feel about interracial dating...

Recently I have been criticized by black women for always being a "light chaser"  i e ... I only date light skin black women or latinas

now honestly I don't agree I find all women pretty including "dark" sisters

But I'm not going to lie my track record pretty much is mocha to white for the past couple of years...

A smart woman of color who I respect highly says it is do to the slave master favoring the lighter skin black people over darker ones..


So what are your thoughts on the subject?

Justice

P.S.  check out some of the thoughts on this link

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20060918120903AAEsnqH
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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #98 on: May 10, 2007, 05:41:59 PM »
to bring back the topic of black male role models....

Does anyone remember that comment Rosie O'Donnell made about their not being many black role models and that is why black folk rallied around O.J.?

Nah what was that about? Do you have a link?

Not the most reliable source, but I remember seeing it on more crediable news outlets.

http://www.tmz.com/2006/07/10/lets-get-this-party-started-top-stories-for-07-10-06/16
It is easy to change the language of oppression without changing the sociopolitical situation of its victims.

Journeyman

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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #99 on: May 10, 2007, 05:58:20 PM »
Well, as far as interracial dating...if I would waited for AA women to take me seriously as a person...I would of had my first date EVER at age 20.

I would frankly love to date an intellectual, sensible AA woman, but in the meantime, I made the decision to (or ideally) date intellectual, sensible women.  Period. 

Isn't that what really matters?

You associate with people who you build a good rapport with.  You date people who you have chemistry with.
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Journeyman, I am dumbfounded as to how you got into IU and W&L with your numbers. 155 LSAT and you applied to Vanderbilt? Honestly?