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Author Topic: The Black Men Thread  (Read 114433 times)

Eugene Young

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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #30 on: May 10, 2007, 09:57:05 AM »
I think Condoleeza is a positive.  I think Obama is a positive, that is if our youth can relate to him.  They are not stupid.  They know they did not have white mommas, have daddies that went to harvard, nor grow up in Hawaii/Indonesia.  If it's not common knowledge already among our youth, it will be.  I would argue someone like Leeza, despite her politics, is more of a role model in the traditional sense of: if she can come from nothing and make it I can too.  And that does seem to be the standard for youth role models nowadays - coming from nothing and making it.  

Honestly I think the "making it" is such a obession with opressed communities it needs to be addressed I mean what is "making it" is it such a worthy ideal as say social justice? gender equality? being a human rights activist?  it seems there is this huge obession with white peoples wealth I'm not saying you are not entilted to materalism but this success worship is becoming self destructive.

Says the man who wants to buddy boink exotic Brazilian chicks.

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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #31 on: May 10, 2007, 10:02:42 AM »
Honestly I think the "making it" is such a obession with opressed communities it needs to be addressed I mean what is "making it" is it such a worthy ideal as say social justice? gender equality? being a human rights activist?  it seems there is this huge obession with white peoples wealth I'm not saying you are not entilted to materalism but this success worship is becoming self destructive.
[/quote]


I don't think I've made that dichotomy.  Nor do I think it necessarily exists.  Making it can just be someone living a productive, meaningful life. In terms of being a role model, obviously the visibility of that person matters to an extent.  

That said, I think economic empowerment to the detriment of social justice can be problematic.  But like I said, the inclusion of one does not mean the exclusion of another.  I think more focus should be placed on economic empowerment in our communities.  I don't confuse "rubberband stacks" with economic empowerment.
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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #32 on: May 10, 2007, 10:05:09 AM »
I think Condoleeza is a positive.  I think Obama is a positive, that is if our youth can relate to him.  They are not stupid.  They know they did not have white mommas, have daddies that went to harvard, nor grow up in Hawaii/Indonesia.  If it's not common knowledge already among our youth, it will be.  I would argue someone like Leeza, despite her politics, is more of a role model in the traditional sense of: if she can come from nothing and make it I can too.  And that does seem to be the standard for youth role models nowadays - coming from nothing and making it.  

Honestly I think the "making it" is such a obession with opressed communities it needs to be addressed I mean what is "making it" is it such a worthy ideal as say social justice? gender equality? being a human rights activist?  it seems there is this huge obession with white peoples wealth I'm not saying you are not entilted to materalism but this success worship is becoming self destructive.

Says the man who wants to buddy boink exotic Brazilian chicks.

Lol...


Fighting for "social justice, gender equality, and human rights" is easier inside the system than outside of it.  Think about it bro, you don't always have to be a radical to improve social conditions.  
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7S

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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #33 on: May 10, 2007, 10:33:58 AM »
Lol...


Fighting for "social justice, gender equality, and human rights" is easier inside the system than outside of it.  Think about it bro, you don't always have to be a radical to improve social conditions.  
[/quote]

Thurgood Marshall and Charles Houston being prime examples of that fact.

I love Cornell West (just read Race Matters and it was good), but I think he totally missed the mark with his statement about Barack. Obama is not running for President of Black America. Apparently, Jesse has already filled that position. He is running for President of the United States, and that entails representing all cultures in America. I could care less about him being a no-show at Tavis' event. However, I am concerned about his stances on affirmative action, racial profiling, healthcare, and our economy. Those aren't white issues. They affect everyone. I read Audacity of Hope and he seems to have the right political philosophy to get this country back on track.

If that is being a sell-out, then I'm definitely buying.
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Kirk Lazarus

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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #34 on: May 10, 2007, 10:46:19 AM »
Yeah I remember (of course, I was alive back then) when John Kennedy was running for President and him being Catholic was a big big deal during the 1960 election. He told the world that he wasn't running to be the Catholic candidate for President of the United States, he was running to be the Democratic Party's candidate for President and he just happened to be Catholic.

Obviously I care about social justice, gender equality and human rights, but I don't think that Obama should be held to an impossible standard because he is Black. This guy is in it to win it and in my opinion, he seems to have the correct sensibilities on those tough social justice issues. That is what I'm looking for in a candidate.

That being said, I'm probably going to support Hillary.
 

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7S

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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #35 on: May 10, 2007, 10:53:52 AM »
That being said, I'm probably going to support Hillary.

ahh damn.
It is easy to change the language of oppression without changing the sociopolitical situation of its victims.

Justiceforall

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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #36 on: May 10, 2007, 11:35:50 AM »
I think Condoleeza is a positive.  I think Obama is a positive, that is if our youth can relate to him.  They are not stupid.  They know they did not have white mommas, have daddies that went to harvard, nor grow up in Hawaii/Indonesia.  If it's not common knowledge already among our youth, it will be.  I would argue someone like Leeza, despite her politics, is more of a role model in the traditional sense of: if she can come from nothing and make it I can too.  And that does seem to be the standard for youth role models nowadays - coming from nothing and making it.  

Honestly I think the "making it" is such a obession with opressed communities it needs to be addressed I mean what is "making it" is it such a worthy ideal as say social justice? gender equality? being a human rights activist?  it seems there is this huge obession with white peoples wealth I'm not saying you are not entilted to materalism but this success worship is becoming self destructive.

Says the man who wants to buddy boink exotic Brazilian chicks.

and how is social justice and dating exotic women  contradictory..one comes from a values system another comes from my own pursuit of sexual conquest..you don't have to "make it" in order to date exotic women.  Nor in the pursuit of social justice surrender ones sexual needs and desires.
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Justiceforall

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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #37 on: May 10, 2007, 11:40:23 AM »
Honestly I think the "making it" is such a obession with opressed communities it needs to be addressed I mean what is "making it" is it such a worthy ideal as say social justice? gender equality? being a human rights activist?  it seems there is this huge obession with white peoples wealth I'm not saying you are not entilted to materalism but this success worship is becoming self destructive.



I don't think I've made that dichotomy.  Nor do I think it necessarily exists.  Making it can just be someone living a productive, meaningful life. In terms of being a role model, obviously the visibility of that person matters to an extent.  

That said, I think economic empowerment to the detriment of social justice can be problematic.  But like I said, the inclusion of one does not mean the exclusion of another.  I think more focus should be placed on economic empowerment in our communities.  I don't confuse "rubberband stacks" with economic empowerment.
[/quote]

agreed but ones visibility seems to get a lot more emphasis now then ones values, and lets face it now matter what car you drive, or what benz you roll in..you will never be "them". They will always look at you as a little monkey. Eventualy rather then pursuing this "making it scheme" for external validation (which in then end I think that is why the majority of people pursue such things) We should be proud of who we are rather then try and be something were not just to fit in. 
Live The Dream....


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The LSAT score usually factors in about 60% of the reason a law school would or would not admit you..be safe ...get a perfect score-Me

Justiceforall

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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #38 on: May 10, 2007, 11:42:27 AM »
I think Condoleeza is a positive.  I think Obama is a positive, that is if our youth can relate to him.  They are not stupid.  They know they did not have white mommas, have daddies that went to harvard, nor grow up in Hawaii/Indonesia.  If it's not common knowledge already among our youth, it will be.  I would argue someone like Leeza, despite her politics, is more of a role model in the traditional sense of: if she can come from nothing and make it I can too.  And that does seem to be the standard for youth role models nowadays - coming from nothing and making it.  

Honestly I think the "making it" is such a obession with opressed communities it needs to be addressed I mean what is "making it" is it such a worthy ideal as say social justice? gender equality? being a human rights activist?  it seems there is this huge obession with white peoples wealth I'm not saying you are not entilted to materalism but this success worship is becoming self destructive.

Says the man who wants to buddy boink exotic Brazilian chicks.

Lol...


Fighting for "social justice, gender equality, and human rights" is easier inside the system than outside of it.  Think about it bro, you don't always have to be a radical to improve social conditions.  

Right booker t washington was defintley the way to go... we've been throwing the democratic party over 90% of our votes for years and what has it netted us?..looking for social change within the democratic party for black people is like looking for a virgin at a brothel
Live The Dream....


Made In America...

The LSAT score usually factors in about 60% of the reason a law school would or would not admit you..be safe ...get a perfect score-Me

Justiceforall

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Re: The Black Men Thread
« Reply #39 on: May 10, 2007, 12:02:03 PM »
Lol...


Fighting for "social justice, gender equality, and human rights" is easier inside the system than outside of it.  Think about it bro, you don't always have to be a radical to improve social conditions.  

Thurgood Marshall and Charles Houston being prime examples of that fact.

I love Cornell West (just read Race Matters and it was good), but I think he totally missed the mark with his statement about Barack. Obama is not running for President of Black America. Apparently, Jesse has already filled that position. He is running for President of the United States, and that entails representing all cultures in America. I could care less about him being a no-show at Tavis' event. However, I am concerned about his stances on affirmative action, racial profiling, healthcare, and our economy. Those aren't white issues. They affect everyone. I read Audacity of Hope and he seems to have the right political philosophy to get this country back on track.

If that is being a sell-out, then I'm definitely buying.
[/quote]

Jesse is not the president of black america; black america has no president.  Black america has many diffrent political leaders but there is no elected office that speaks on behalf of black people. (with the exception of the congressional black caucuss but even still they are limited in their advocacy of the black community) The concerns of white people are not the same concerns of black people. Black people (or people of color in general) have come from a diffrent history, background, and culture. Many people of color come from a diffrent economic class, and have suffered opression perputated by a white dominant structure. What I consider selling out is when you have to cater to other "masters" rather then your own independant voice and the people you are supposed to represent. Obama has to not base his stance just on his values, and people of color who  voted for him  but what is politicaly advantegous for him to get electoral votes. (this is why Bill Clinton can smooch black people with his charisma and saxaphone playing, kissing black babies, then send generations of black men into jail with his "crime bill" to appease white folks)  If that is what you think a president has to do...(especialy one from the black community) cater to "all" peoples intrest then I won't support that president. There is a direct contradiction I find between serving the people and serving those who fund you in the american political system. HENCE, I believe that Obama in the end is a politican and politicans are not to be trusted.   Those who work within the system got success?  So I guess MLK supporting the democratic party was what got some form of racial justice? I can imagine going to the white citizens council for representation (lol). Malcolm X advocated voting for Lyndon B Johnson?  W.E.B. Du Bois spokesperson for the Democratic party? nonsense..
Live The Dream....


Made In America...

The LSAT score usually factors in about 60% of the reason a law school would or would not admit you..be safe ...get a perfect score-Me