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Author Topic: law school over 40 yrs oif age  (Read 13188 times)

esq._almost

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law school over 40 yrs oif age
« on: May 06, 2007, 08:13:31 AM »
anyone hear anyone do that?
success? failure?

Too Old For Law

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Re: law school over 40 yrs oif age
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2007, 11:44:33 AM »
I'm anxious to hear about this too.  If I go next year, I'll be 43 when I start.  That, a husband and two kids makes me wonder if maybe I've lost my mind to consider this.

Thistle

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Re: law school over 40 yrs oif age
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2007, 11:58:56 AM »
i'll get back to you on that.  too hungover right now.   :P


lesson #1:  dont try to keep up with the kids
non ex transverso sed deorsum


JD

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Re: law school over 40 yrs oif age
« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2007, 12:02:43 PM »
Ha ha rev.  I am 35, and have been occassionally irritated that everything in law school is set up as if the whole class is 22.  Seriously.  Drinking on Thursdays when I have class at 8 am Friday? That's ridiculous!  (I tried it once, and hated myself)

Law school is totally doable, and the less you try to "hang" with the kids, the better.  I have tried to do the opposite, & have gotten nothing but agrravation as a result.  Let's face it, it's not going to be fun to listen to your 23 year old SBA VP try and explain to you how to interview someone, when you were a manager for 8 years in your previous life. :)

Thistle

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Re: law school over 40 yrs oif age
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2007, 01:04:52 PM »
ok, i'll try to give it a shot.  a shower and coffee have at least re-started my heart.

i'm 47, just finishing up 1L.  all our kids are out of the house.

positives:

-you are treated much more respectfully by the professors.  i even had one who asked me if i preferred to be called 'reverend' (no, not even when i was one).
-you know what hills are worth dying on.  you know what to argue about, and what not to.  you don't get all emotionally passionate in class about this issue or that.  stupid things do not typically exit your mouth.
-you are not intimidated by the socratic method.  you have probably dated scarier people than the professor, or at least worked for a more demanding boss.
-you have a much better idea how to prioritize.
-you have real-life experience about many of the topics in class.  99% of my classmates have never bought a house, life insurance, or made a will.
-the kids treat you like a surrogate parent.  i've been elected to two sba positions unopposed.  i've done quite a bit of 'counseling' as well.
-you don't have to be in the top 10% of class to know that you're a worthwhile human being.  sure, you might get disappointed, but odds are you've faced worse disappointments than that. 
-you typically won't freak out when deliverables are due, or before exam time.  you're satisfied with doing your best.
-if youre married your spouse can make or break you.

negatives:
-if you've been out of school for a while, the study habits take a while to come back.  i read a lot, but not this much and i have some pretty severe eyestrain as a result
-you don't heal as quickly.  if you get a cold, the flu, etc, you wont be bouncing back to class the next day.
-the kids will like you and invite you out to the bars and their events.  its ok to go sometimes.  but dont try to keep up.
-you might feel like you have more to prove.
-its humbling when a 23-year-old waxes your ass on an exam.
-life experience can get in the way.  you cant forget what you know.  oh, and common sense has no real place in the law.
-your writing styles, speaking styles, and opinions on things can be pretty set.  be flexible.  my profs told me that the biggest struggle for older students was to be able to dispassionately see and argue both sides of an issue.
-you dont fit.  not a problem for me, because i never fit -- but... the profs treat you more like a colleague (but youre not)and the kids treat you like a surrogate parent/older bro/sis... but youre not.  just be yourself and dont force it.  you *will* make friends among your classmates.
-if youre married your spouse can make or break you.

if i can think of anything else i will add it.  oh, btw, this was from another thread, and i think it remains good advice, though it is mostly directed towards the younger students:

From my first year of law school.

1.  Do NOT be "that guy."  You KNOW who I'm talking about.  The guy who won't shut up, and offers his worthless opinion on EVERY topic.  With all the experience of 23 years of living at his command, this loudmouth cretin's hand shoots up so many times that by the second semester, you can actually hear the groans of dismay.  When the professor says, desperately, "Anyone?  Anyone else?" you will know that you have become "that guy."

And that we all hate you.

2.  Share.  Yes, it's a concept that you should have learned in kindergarten, but somehow your mommy forgot to teach it to you.  If a classmate is gone, grab them an extra handout.  Give them a copy of your notes.  Email them the next assignment.  I will promise you, especially if you will be practicing in a small market, that you will be remembered.  Wouldn't you rather that, the first time you argue before the judge that you went to school with, they remember you as the guy who gave them their notes when their computer crashed a week before finals?  Or the jackass that said, "Oh well, wouldn't wanna be YOU."  In this situation, just bend over and kiss your ass goodbye, because you are DONE, son.  Judges have long memories.

3.  Don't make fun of the old people.  Yes, maybe you think that us old folks who return to school at age whatever are pathetic.  Keep it to yourself.  In my class, there are at least two of us whom you would never even hear coming:  The 17-year special forces veteran who sits in my seat, and the airborne ranger with the bronze star and CIB who sits across the way.  Oh, and if you think that the 55-year-old ex-doctor is safe to mock, he's treated half the justices on the state supreme court, and can get a phone call through within minutes.  I've seen him do it.  The dumpy lady on the front row?  Her husband is managing partner at one of the biggest firms in Memphis.  The quiet, grey-haired guy that *always* sits by himself?  20 years as an IRS agent.  At least thats what he says.  I can smell CIA all over him, though, and once a company man, *always* a company man.

Play nice with us and we'll play nice with you.  @#!* with us, and we'll make your life a living hell.

4.  Keep your family connections to yourself.  Those of us who have busted our asses to get where we are will NOT look kindly on your never having worked because your grandpa is a federal judge, or the fact that your 1.90 GPA will still get you a job in daddy's firm -- and he's paying your tuition, room and board, and even gives you an allowance.  If you are one of these fortunates, count your blessings and shut up.  Or better still, help those of us who aren't that lucky find something too, or at least buy us a beer every once and a while.

Oh, and btw, no we *don't* want to see your new beemer while we're driving a Honda Civic and eating ravioli.

5.  Don't kiss and tell.  Don't @#!* the professors.  Don't cheat.  Don't make life harder on your classmates.  Don't drink too much at social functions.  Don't hit on the dean's wife.  Anything I missed?  Oh, yeah, don't hit the "send" button on an angry email until you've let it sit overnight, no matter how "right" you are.

6. Don't talk about grades, exams, class rank, or anything else with anyone but your closest confidants.  Someone will *always* feel bad after one of these exchanges.  It is ok to female dog about a particular exam, but the old "What did you get for #3?  Really?  Man, the right answer was ......!"  needs to stay in middle school where it belongs.  Too many repeats of that and you will be found behind the dumpster with a Gilbert's stuffed down your throat.

7.   Don't pound on your keyboard during exams like it's halftime at the f-ing Rose Bowl.  Settle down, son, you're driving me nuts!

8.  Do turn your volume down and set your cell phone on vibrate.  The last thing I want to hear during a lecture is your newest rap ringtone.  I have enough trouble paying attention as it is.

9.  Don't have side conversations while the professor is talking.  I don't *CARE* what you think about the way so-and-so is dressed, where you are going after class, how much you drank or who you screwed last weekend.  YOU are not writing the exam.  That's what IM is for, use it!

10.  Take a shower.  Please.

non ex transverso sed deorsum


JD

queencruella

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Re: law school over 40 yrs oif age
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2007, 01:08:42 PM »
Ha ha rev.  I am 35, and have been occassionally irritated that everything in law school is set up as if the whole class is 22.  Seriously.  Drinking on Thursdays when I have class at 8 am Friday? That's ridiculous!  (I tried it once, and hated myself)

Law school is totally doable, and the less you try to "hang" with the kids, the better.  I have tried to do the opposite, & have gotten nothing but agrravation as a result.  Let's face it, it's not going to be fun to listen to your 23 year old SBA VP try and explain to you how to interview someone, when you were a manager for 8 years in your previous life. :)

I generally agree, but I have some friends who are older and some younger friends who are disillusioned with the people who are at the bar every night of the week. I think the key is to find people who are also irritated, regardless of age, and then you can just ignore everyone else outside of class.

esq._almost

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Re: law school over 40 yrs oif age
« Reply #6 on: May 06, 2007, 02:14:56 PM »
in the real work world we work with people of all ages. 
I do not think I am any more concerned with what my classmates are doing now than in undergrad
was thinking from my own perspective more
- the admissions committee thinks I can so I guess I'll just grab the ball and run with that

scottie

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Re: law school over 40 yrs oif age
« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2007, 12:17:22 PM »
I don't have a clue, but I am hoping to find out next year :)  I turn 40 in June and postponed my applications till this next cycle.  If all works out, I will be a 40 year old 1L.  I agree with much of what has been said in the previous posts.  I personally performed a little test case and sat in for a LSAT prep course with an instructor who was 23 and classmates ranging from 21 to 30.  It was eye opening for certain, but I found that I can easily relate to and communicate with the younger students, and yes, even go drinking with them after the dreaded test.  I am hopeful....
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skeeball

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Re: law school over 40 yrs oif age
« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2007, 12:30:51 PM »
Tag, although I really have no place in this thread.

I turn 25 the week before 1L starts.

tacchino

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Re: law school over 40 yrs oif age
« Reply #9 on: May 09, 2007, 12:44:28 AM »
Yup, I am in my midforties and completing (please God, with a modicum of success, if you could!) my first year in a so-called "Tier 1".  As Rev1 said stated so eloquently, there are many positives and negatives about the experience.  It also sounds like he has a few more older non-trads in his section, which is good, because there are not too many in mine.  Most of the "non-trads" are in their early thirties, and in many cases, to be quite blunt, I don't necessarily find many of them more mature than the twenty-three year old's!
However, I have never felt out of sorts here.  I have a support network outside the law school, which for me is important, because I just cannot do these bar nights and parties at all.  Most of the students are genuinely kind, and I am grateful for that.  But I have to say that I don't find a lot of comraderie with these "youngin's" for various reasons.  I guess I am just an old fart, because I find so many of the things these students talk about endlessly (dates, college sports, drinking,etc.) just not very interesting.
So, hang in there!  You definitely will have company!  Just take things with a grain of salt!