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Author Topic: FIU vs Miami  (Read 10729 times)

yoyodawg

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Re: FIU vs Miami
« Reply #30 on: May 03, 2007, 11:48:59 AM »
I am the number 1 UM fan and I think FIU is a solid option if $$$ is a huge concern.  They have really small incoming classes and I have heard nothing but great things about the program from my professors at UM.  If a little spanish offends you then living in south florida is probably not for you. In that case choose UF any day over that dump in tally.  All big cities have crime but for those of you who are unfamiliar with Miami, UM is in Coral Gables which is as nice as it comes.  The campus is practically a country club where Range Rovers are as common as ford explorers.  Miami is a great city but its a love it or hate it place.  Most ignorant people hate it because they think you need a passport to be here. Those of us that live here just laugh when we hear that because we know that there isnt a better place to be.  If you think drinking beer on a porch while flying rebel flags and chewing skoal is appealing, then FSU is for you.

Spoken like someone who never has even been to Tallahassee. Now who's stereotyping?

keelee

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Re: FIU vs Miami
« Reply #31 on: May 03, 2007, 11:57:06 AM »
I am the number 1 UM fan and I think FIU is a solid option if $$$ is a huge concern.  They have really small incoming classes and I have heard nothing but great things about the program from my professors at UM.  If a little spanish offends you then living in south florida is probably not for you. In that case choose UF any day over that dump in tally.  All big cities have crime but for those of you who are unfamiliar with Miami, UM is in Coral Gables which is as nice as it comes.  The campus is practically a country club where Range Rovers are as common as ford explorers.  Miami is a great city but its a love it or hate it place.  Most ignorant people hate it because they think you need a passport to be here. Those of us that live here just laugh when we hear that because we know that there isnt a better place to be.  If you think drinking beer on a porch while flying rebel flags and chewing skoal is appealing, then FSU is for you.

Spoken like someone who never has even been to Tallahassee. Now who's stereotyping?

I'm confused. So you are allowed to stereotype a big city like Miami, but he can't stereotype a cow town like Tallahassee?
Going to as of now...USC or Fordham.

thelawfool

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Re: FIU vs Miami
« Reply #32 on: May 03, 2007, 11:59:39 AM »
lets not hijack a pretty informative thread. 

miami is a pretty nice place to live, but it has its drawbacks (overcrowded, traffic, high rent, etc.).  tally is a beautiful town with its drawbacks as well (not a metropolis, not much a legal community, sort of the middle of nowhere, etc.). 

the main benefit is that miami has a huge legal community with plenty of job opportunities, and you will not need to leave your apartment for the summers to take advantage of a summer job or internship.  then again, tally has government jobs if that's what you are into.

all in all, it doesn't matter since the OP is deciding between two schools IN MIAMI!

FIU Class of 2009

yoyodawg

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Re: FIU vs Miami
« Reply #33 on: May 03, 2007, 12:44:34 PM »
I am the number 1 UM fan and I think FIU is a solid option if $$$ is a huge concern.  They have really small incoming classes and I have heard nothing but great things about the program from my professors at UM.  If a little spanish offends you then living in south florida is probably not for you. In that case choose UF any day over that dump in tally.  All big cities have crime but for those of you who are unfamiliar with Miami, UM is in Coral Gables which is as nice as it comes.  The campus is practically a country club where Range Rovers are as common as ford explorers.  Miami is a great city but its a love it or hate it place.  Most ignorant people hate it because they think you need a passport to be here. Those of us that live here just laugh when we hear that because we know that there isnt a better place to be.  If you think drinking beer on a porch while flying rebel flags and chewing skoal is appealing, then FSU is for you.

Spoken like someone who never has even been to Tallahassee. Now who's stereotyping?

I'm confused. So you are allowed to stereotype a big city like Miami, but he can't stereotype a cow town like Tallahassee?


If you notice, I originally responded to someone who called the panhandle "hickish" in the first place. And I'm not stereotyping. Everything I said is an actual fact.

There are portions of Miami where EVERYTHING is spanish. Further, Miami does have a very high crime rate. So how's that stereotyping?

And as to your comment, I have NEVER seen a cow in Tallahassee. (with the exception of a few "ladies" in the bars at 2 in the morning)

But this isn't what this thread is about. It's about what are the best options in Miami as far as law school goes. The best option is UM strictly speaking for legal opportunities. FIU is better if you don't want a lot of debt.

Now I've got to go put a dip of skoal in my mouth, hang up my confederate flag, sit on my front poarch and look at my cows. Why don't you go carjack someone while speaking Spanish and then steal some car stereos.

my 2 cents

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Re: FIU vs Miami
« Reply #34 on: May 03, 2007, 03:06:14 PM »
Maybe in 20 or 30 years this should be question. Right now this shouldn't even be a question.  UM is an easy choice.
FIU has absolutely no name recognition outside Miami.It is debatable that they even have a name in Miami.
I love how people always think because a school is cheap that makes it a great school. This is nonsense. Just because FIU is cheap does not mean it will improve your career options.

FIU as of now has pretty poor career options. Their employment rate at graduation is less then 50%. Also that is with extremely small classes. Imagine if FIU had a class of over 400 like UM. Their employment rate at graduation would probably be 10-20%. Sure having a lesser amount of loans is fine, but try paying them off with no job.

Here is another indicator. OCI interviews. These stats are misleading because not all employers report it and some employers don't even show up.

FIU is 38
UM is 154

And I have heard at FIU they don't actually show up, they just collect resumes.

In sum, FIU career options are very poor. You may have less loans, but most likely if you even have a job a graduation it will be a much lower paying job. Plus you probably will confine yourself to having to work in Miami. A UM degree does not limit your options to just Miami.

I would go to UM and not even think twice.

To me the only schools in Florida I would even consider would be UF, UM, FSU, and to a lesser degree Stetson.

queencruella

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Re: FIU vs Miami
« Reply #35 on: May 03, 2007, 03:13:13 PM »
Maybe in 20 or 30 years this should be question. Right now this shouldn't even be a question.  UM is an easy choice.
FIU has absolutely no name recognition outside Miami.It is debatable that they even have a name in Miami.
I love how people always think because a school is cheap that makes it a great school. This is nonsense. Just because FIU is cheap does not mean it will improve your career options.

FIU as of now has pretty poor career options. Their employment rate at graduation is less then 50%. Also that is with extremely small classes. Imagine if FIU had a class of over 400 like UM. Theire employment rate at graduation would probably be 10-20%. Sure having a lesser amount of loans is fine, but try paying them off with no loans.

Here is another indicator. OCI interviews. These stats are misleading because not all employers report it and some employers don't even show up.

FIU is 38
UM is 154

And I have heard at FIU they don't actually show up, they just collect resumes.

In sum, FIU career options are very poor. You may have less loans, but most likely if you have a job a graduation it will be a much lower paying job.

I would go to UM and not even think twice.

To me the only school in Florida I would even consider would be UF, UM, FSU, and Stetsson.


Just because a firm goes to OCI doesn't mean people get hired. Most people do not get jobs from OCI, even in T1 schools. FIU just got ABA approved as well, and I'm sure that plays a large role in how many people come to OCI. They don't want to waste time on a school unless it is actually ABA approved for obvious reasons.

thelawfool

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Re: FIU vs Miami
« Reply #36 on: May 03, 2007, 03:22:07 PM »
Maybe in 20 or 30 years this should be question. Right now this shouldn't even be a question.  UM is an easy choice.
FIU has absolutely no name recognition outside Miami.It is debatable that they even have a name in Miami.
I love how people always think because a school is cheap that makes it a great school. This is nonsense. Just because FIU is cheap does not mean it will improve your career options.

FIU as of now has pretty poor career options. Their employment rate at graduation is less then 50%. Also that is with extremely small classes. Imagine if FIU had a class of over 400 like UM. Their employment rate at graduation would probably be 10-20%. Sure having a lesser amount of loans is fine, but try paying them off with no job.

Here is another indicator. OCI interviews. These stats are misleading because not all employers report it and some employers don't even show up.

FIU is 38
UM is 154

And I have heard at FIU they don't actually show up, they just collect resumes.

In sum, FIU career options are very poor. You may have less loans, but most likely if you even have a job a graduation it will be a much lower paying job. Plus you probably will confine yourself to having to work in Miami. A UM degree does not limit your options to just Miami.

I would go to UM and not even think twice.

To me the only schools in Florida I would even consider would be UF, UM, FSU, and to a lesser degree Stetson.


Definitely a valid argument and the obvious argument for Miami.  I don't think you can jump to those conclusions that 10-20% of students would be employed at graduation with a bigger class size, however.  In fact, I would go as far to say that many more than the 43% reported have jobs.  Now that we are actually ranked T3 with ABA approval, I think our deans are going to push harder for our graduates to fill out the employed forms. 

Now that we have ABA approval, topped the bar exam list and moved into the new building, i'd like to see the reported numbers on next year's USNWR before jumping to those conclusions that we have "poor employment options." 

However, your statements about Miami are valid and that degree definitely travels. No one is arguing that Miami isn't the best school in Miami.

FIU Class of 2009

highman444

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Re: FIU vs Miami
« Reply #37 on: May 03, 2007, 03:23:02 PM »
Yeah, if you dont want a job, then dont go to FIU. look at all of the firms (only 15) that did oci @ fiu and you will find only ONE fiu grad working there.

That entire university is in trouble

highman444

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Re: FIU vs Miami
« Reply #38 on: May 03, 2007, 03:24:49 PM »
Take a look at the whole university

if the university has a bad rep, then the law school will have a bad rep

http://www.miamiherald.com/459/story/94306.html

Tangled in investigation, 2 at FIU quit
BY NOAH BIERMAN
nbierman@MiamiHerald.com

 Document | Memo #1
 Document | Memo #2
The top two directors of Florida International University's online course department have resigned while the school investigates a private company they started that was charging hundreds of students $60 each to buy required electronic textbooks.

The men were drawing six-figure salaries from FIU, while controlling a business that benefited from links with three FIU online courses.

''It's always the little guys that get squished in the middle,'' Mohammad Izadpanah, 30, the former FIU Online director, said in a brief interview Wednesday. He said he and his former deputy, Reynoldo Morejon, 31, are being unfairly targeted. Morejon did not return messages.

FIU began its investigation, which it expects to complete in the next two weeks, after a detailed Feb. 28 complaint made by a whistle-blower who works in the online department.

Marcos Perez, FIU executive vice president, said school administrators were unaware of the apparent conflict before then.

But a Sept. 26 e-mail from Izadpanah to his supervisor lays out his plan to start a private business that would create online content for professors at FIU and other schools. His note said his company ''would be treated the same'' as other publishers who do business with faculty.

''I feel confident that as long as we keep it low key that everything should be approved just fine,'' Izadpanah wrote in the e-mail to business school dean Joyce Elam. ``Hence, as long as someone doesn't go poking around, we should be just fine.''

Elam did not return five phone messages left at her office since Friday. Perez said he cannot speculate why the e-mail did not raise a red flag. He said Elam, a well-respected dean, trusted Izadpanah when he signed an ''outside activity'' form that listed his second job as ''consultant'' and certified that his private work did not present a conflict of interest with his FIU activities.

Online education is one of the fastest-growing areas at FIU, expanding from a handful of classes offered in 2000, when the program began, to 200 this year. Though FIU is a public university, the online department is run like a business, under the authority of business school dean Elam, with five-figure bonuses granted to employees who meet revenue goals. Students enrolled in online classes pay $299 online support fees that nearly double their tuition, even though the courses require no classroom space. FIU generated $11 million from the fees this year.

Izadpanah resigned effective this week. In less than six years at FIU, his income rose from $45,000 to $169,000 -- through promotions and a 10 percent lump-sum bonus he earned in November after the online department reached a $2 million revenue goal for the business school.

Morejon resigned as associate director of FIU online effective April 13. He was hired in 2003 at $45,000 a year. He made $107,000 last year, including a 10 percent bonus.

FIU Online employees work with professors to convert curriculum into online classes and electronic textbooks. This semester, FIU Online began routing more than 900 students enrolled in a music appreciation class, a finance class and a communications class to a website run by a company called HigherL that registered students for a required online textbook at a cost of $60.

Previously, FIU produced the electronic textbooks internally. In December, Izadpanah wrote in an e-mail to several FIU Online employees that the department would begin outsourcing the electronic textbooks and focus more of its efforts on growth.

Perez said FIU lawyers believe the school, not HigherL, owns the rights to the electronic textbooks.

Morejon is listed on corporate documents as HigherL's only manager. But in e-mail exchanges with Elam, Izadpanah did not dispute having control of the company. Perez said FIU believes both men have a financial interest in HigherL, but an April 3 e-mail from Elam indicates Izadpanah had left the company by then.

Perez said two part-time FIU Online employees have also been asked to resign because they were doing work with HigherL.

In March, after the investigation had begun, Izadpanah wrote in an e-mail to Elam that many FIU Online employees have outside employment and that he helps get them work because ``it seems to really motivate a lot of folks.''

Elam wrote back that he should stop helping them find outside work and that ``I will only approve in exceptional cases and where it is clear that there is not a conflict of interest.''

Perez said: ``The most important discovery for us is that somebody that had an active [business] interest ... was doing business with the university. That's a clear conflict of interest.''

Before Izadpanah submitted his resignation, FIU's audit department received a complaint that he questioned employees in an effort to find out who lodged the complaint against him and Morejon. Izadpanah wrote in an April 5 e-mail that his comments were misconstrued.

''I will cooperate fully with the Office of General Counsel, HR, and the Auditor's office but what are my rights here and what is the responsibility of HR to protect me from any unfair accusations?'' Izadpanah wrote.

Tuesday, FIU provost Ronald Berkman sent out a memo to all FIU employees, summarizing the incident and reminding them to review the school's conflict of interest policies.

thelawfool

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Re: FIU vs Miami
« Reply #39 on: May 03, 2007, 03:35:11 PM »
the FIU COL is basically a private school on the FIU campus.  we have absolutely nothing to do with the undergrad community.  we have our own administration, registrar, deans, student services, etc.  the undergraduate program is not strong.  it is one of the biggest schools in the state however and a lot of money that gets pumped into the school goes to the COL.

also, to be fair to the graduates of FIU COL, there have only been 2 graduating classes.  literally, roughly 150 people have graduated from our school.  many that attended the first few years were older people that were either trying to advance their careers or just better themselves. 

no one is debating that FIU Law is a new school...

FIU Class of 2009