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Author Topic: U of T for a future career in Vancouver?  (Read 1430 times)

mcollinge

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U of T for a future career in Vancouver?
« on: April 27, 2007, 01:27:00 AM »
Currently my vague plan is to go to U of T, possibly article in Toronto, and then move back to the West Coast. I am from Victoria, and I would like to practice in Vancouver eventually for the "lifestyle" considerations, proximity to family, etc.

The reason I want to go to U of T is because it is the most prestigious school in Canada, and I think that a degree from there would serve me well. Also, I know a lot of people in Toronto, and have liked the city when I have visited there. I also want to go there because I DO NOT want to go to UVic since I did my undergrad there and am fed up with the lefty politics all the hippies... UBC seems to rank poorly in most regards (especially student satisfaction), so I am kind of adverse to going there. 

Now I have read all the talk on this board about how Vancouver is supposed to have a glut of recent law school graduates and correspondingly low salaries, but really, Vancouver is a pretty sweet city IMO.

Anyhow, does my plan seem like a good one (assuming I get into U of T with my 176 LSAT and my 3.7 GPA including all 4 years)? Maybe I should go to UBC? Maybe I should forget the whole country and go to NYU?

mark_ede

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Re: U of T for a future career in Vancouver?
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2007, 07:45:13 PM »
Was this a silly attempt to mention your LSAT score?

Yes if you go to UofT, and article in Toronto and then move back West; salaries are generally lower outside of Toronto, that's simply how the industry is. UofT is a fine school. If you want to work in Canada I think it's generally better to go to a Canadian school.

mcollinge

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Re: U of T for a future career in Vancouver?
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2007, 10:45:03 PM »
Was this a silly attempt to mention your LSAT score?

Yeah, you got it. Far from this being a legitimate question concerning my entire future career, it was an pointless exercise in egoism... (can you read the sarcasm?)

Yes if you go to UofT, and article in Toronto and then move back West; salaries are generally lower outside of Toronto, that's simply how the industry is. UofT is a fine school. If you want to work in Canada I think it's generally better to go to a Canadian school.

OK, thanks for posting because you are clearly very informed... (can you read the sarcasm?)

Re: U of T for a future career in Vancouver?
« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2007, 05:03:30 AM »
Going to Toronto to work out west would be fine.  I think it is now known throughout the country as the finest law school, and from looking at the websites of the largest Vancouver firms the last 2 years, U of T seems to send as many students to Vancouver as any non-BC school.  As for going to the States, you will have some great options.  You could probably get a full tuition scholarship at a top 14 law school, and Harvard, Yale, and Stanford are the only schools where you wouldn't be a sure-fire admit.

mark_ede

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Re: U of T for a future career in Vancouver?
« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2007, 11:59:12 AM »
I was largely being sarcastic myself; on the LSAT point. My apologies.I am still recovering from my Contracts exam  :'(

Seriously in my opinion (as a student at UofT) if you're a good law student you'll break into the West Coast market regardless of which (Canadian-the U.S dynamics are somewhat different) school you go to (i.e. UBC vs. UofT vs. UVic). The tightness in the market is generally those of us on the cusp, not those on top (though much of the process seems to be based on matters fit, not numbers).

UofT does have the advantage of a well funded, well staffed careers office one can take advantage of; from what I understand its funding (for obvious reasons) is raher more generous then elsewhere.

It simply is more difficult to work in Canada if you go to school in the U.S; the NCA process simply assures this. The problem is not that the process is hard, the problem is if you graduate from a well ranked U.S school (and you can certainly get in somewhere at least as good as UofT) the opportunity costs of the NCA process are extremely high-as much as hundreds of thousands of dollars of foregone wages. One hopes over time LSUC will get off its ass and make international transfers easier, especially since it's possible to practice with little delay in the Northeastern U.S at this point (immigration issues aside).