Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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Poll

Do you want to go solo?

Guy - Yes
 7 (14.9%)
Guy - No
 13 (27.7%)
Guy - Unsure
 7 (14.9%)
Gal - Yes
 2 (4.3%)
Gal - No
 11 (23.4%)
Gal - Unsure
 7 (14.9%)

Total Members Voted: 47

Author Topic: Law Links and Polls (duh)  (Read 8045 times)

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Re: Law Links and Polls (duh)
« Reply #140 on: January 10, 2008, 10:38:38 AM »
http://www.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/01/09/ep.suing.docs/index.html

"What are her losses -- maybe $50,000? I can't afford to take a case that recovers $50,000," says Wayne Grant, an Atlanta malpractice attorney. "My expenses would likely be more than the recovery. She's out of luck."


I wonder how often a statement like this is made?
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Re: Law Links and Polls (duh)
« Reply #141 on: January 11, 2008, 04:14:58 PM »
http://susancartierliebel.typepad.com/build_a_solo_practice/2008/01/lawyer-auctions.html

Lawyer Auctions His Diploma on E-Bay for the Price of his Education


this is awesome....   ;D
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Re: Law Links and Polls (duh)
« Reply #142 on: January 13, 2008, 05:39:42 PM »
Do you really believe in free speech, or just in speech you agree with?

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Re: Law Links and Polls (duh)
« Reply #143 on: January 22, 2008, 08:33:16 AM »
 After 25 years, lawyers reveal haunting secret


 Chicago Tribune
  For a quarter of a century, two Chicago lawyers were bound by the rules of law to hold onto a secret that now could mean freedom for a man serving a life sentence for murder.
  The secret — memorialized on an affidavit locked in a metal box — was that their client, Andrew Wilson, admitted that he killed a security guard at a McDonald’s in January 1982.
  Lawyers Dale Coventry and Jamie Kunz could do nothing as another man, Alton Logan, was tried and convicted.
  The two lawyers testified in court last week that they were bound by the attorneyclient privilege and Wilson’s admonition that they reveal his admission only after his death. Wilson, who was serving a life sentence for killing two police officers, died of natural causes Nov. 19.
  Coventry and Kunz have been haunted by knowing that they had evidence of Logan’s innocence, but could not disclose it until Wilson died. “It was a relief,” said Kunz, 70. “It hurts to know somebody is in prison all these years and is innocent.”
  The saga began with the Jan. 11, 1982, robbery at a McDonald’s in which security guard Lloyd Wycliffe was killed by a shotgun blast and another guard was wounded. The gunmen stole the guards’ handguns.
  On Feb. 5, 1982, Edgar Hope was arrested after he killed a police officer. He was carrying a gun taken from the guards at the McDonald’s.
  Two days later, Logan was arrested and, along with Hope, charged with murder in the McDonald’s case, based on the testimony of witnesses who said he killed Wycliffe.
  The ink was barely dry on the charges when, on Feb. 9, two Chicago police officers were shot dead. Their guns were taken. The crime triggered a massive search for Andrew Wilson and his brother, Jackie.
  On Feb. 13, police raided a beauty parlor where they believed Andrew Wilson was hiding. While they did not find Wilson, they did find the guns belonging to the two dead officers, and a shotgun. Firearms tests linked the shotgun to a shell found at the McDonald’s. But with two men already charged in the shootings, and witnesses saying only two gunmen were involved, authorities never charged Wilson in that case.
  Coventry and Kunz, both then assistant public defenders, were assigned to be Wilson’s lawyers. The attorney defending Edgar Hope came to them to say his client was contending that Logan was innocent, and that it was Wilson who killed the guard.
  Coventry and Kunz confronted Wilson with Hope’s claim.
  “He kind of chuckled over the fact that someone else was charged with something he did,” Coventry recalled.
  The lawyers were bound by attorney ethics not to disclose Wilson’s statement, but he said they could reveal it after his death. Conversations between a client and his lawyer are almost always confidential, unless the client agrees to disclose them.
  On March 17, 1982, Coventry and Kunz drew up the affidavit in which Wilson swore Logan did not kill Lloyd Wycliffe. Each lawyer signed it, as did a witness and a notary public. Then they sealed it in a metal box.



thats just sick...
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Re: Law Links and Polls (duh)
« Reply #144 on: February 19, 2008, 10:44:26 AM »
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Re: Law Links and Polls (duh)
« Reply #145 on: March 17, 2008, 09:26:50 AM »
http://www2.tbo.com/content/2008/mar/16/na-law-schools-add-job-training-to-theory-heavy-cu/?news-nationworld

Law Schools Add Job Training To Theory-Heavy Curriculum

By JUSTIN POPE

The Associated Press

Published: March 16, 2008

Medical students learn the ropes on real patients during hospital rounds. Student journalists practice by writing stories. But if learning-by-doing seems an obvious way to master a profession, one corner of higher education has largely avoided it: law schools.

Critics say the country's 200 accredited law schools are guilty of building some of academia's tallest ivory towers, where students learn to "think like lawyers" but get little preparation for what lawyers actually do.

The result: a rising chorus of complaints from employers that even after three years of school (and $150,000 or more in tuition), the nation's 50,000 annual law school graduates still need to be trained on the job.

A number of prominent law schools, including Harvard and Stanford, have responded lately by beginning to shake up how they teach. Now, a small but respected law school in Virginia, Washington & Lee University, is planning even more fundamental changes likely to attract widespread notice in the legal community.

The school is announcing plans to have students spend their final year - a time for breezy classes and little hard work at many schools - in "practicum" courses, where they will imitate real-world lawyering every step of the way.

Prestige Tied To Theoretical Study

It works like this: Typically, in a business law class, for example, students work through a hefty book where they study a range of cases. Students might follow the full range of legal problems that would typically come before a single company - antitrust, real estate, consumer protection and international law. The classes would still largely be taught on campus, perhaps by a professor along with a visiting practicing lawyer.

"I think that prestige within the world of law schools became tied exclusively to the intellectual, theoretical side of legal study," Washington & Lee law dean Rodney Smolla said. "That became the currency by which law professors judged one another."

Law schools have fallen short in helping the young "learning to absorb the complicated facts that a client presents them with," Smolla said.

Some law schools whose professors don't necessarily publish the most articles or have the most prestige, including the City University of New York and the Massachusetts School of Law, have been focused on practical lawyering for years.

Last year, a report by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching fueled the debate by arguing the traditional approach has left the "impression that lawyers are more like competitive scholars than attorneys engaged with the problems of clients."

Students are well taught in boiling down facts and applying the law. But most cases are messy, and students don't learn to navigate complex ethical and social issues, or work together to solve problems.

The Carnegie report has prompted several conferences to talk about reform. At Harvard, where the first modern law school curriculum was laid out in 1872, a committee surveyed alumni about their professional experiences, leading to changes including more emphasis on regulatory and international law.

Stanford has emphasized interdisciplinary study, and both are giving students more opportunities for clinical practice. Detroit Mercy School of Law has begun requiring courses that simulate work in a large law firm.

One Downside For Students

At Washington & Lee, Robin Fretwell Wilson has begun teaching a pilot class in family law along the lines of the new model and said the differences are substantial. It's an entirely different approach that focuses on navigating the intricacies of an actual prenuptial agreement, for example, and the questions students will need to understand - like what it really means when an agreement calls for "best" efforts instead of "reasonable" ones.

For students at Washington & Lee, which will phase in the changes over the next few years, the downside could be the end of the famously halcyon third year. Typically, students take small, contemplative classes and focus mostly on playing softball and bar-hopping.
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Do you really believe in free speech, or just in speech you agree with?