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Author Topic: Blacks and LSAT scores  (Read 5574 times)

Will Hunting

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Re: Blacks and LSAT scores
« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2007, 01:54:51 AM »
Last post on this area of the LSD board:

Would you rather be admitted based on the content of your character, the color of your skin, or both? 
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Louis55

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Re: Blacks and LSAT scores
« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2007, 02:31:26 AM »
quote author=Will Hunting link=topic=86628.msg2159364#msg2159364 date=1176789291]
Last post on this area of the LSD board:

Would you rather be admitted based on the content of your character, the color of your skin, or both? 
[/quote]

Can you separate those two. For some people of color their race has had a significant impact on their character. And if people were admitted based on the content of their character we would not be having this discussion because (I hope) you would not assume that minority students have poorer characters than their white counterparts. what u are truly upset with is their LSAT scores being below the median, which has nothing to do with the content of their character!

And you went too far by bring Dr. King into this… The Dr. King I know is a lot more complex than his “I Have a Dream” speech.  Please do not misinterpret Dr. King’s dream with his realities…

Setting the record straight

The exploitation of King's name, the distortion of his teachings for political gain, is an ugly development. The term "affirmative action" did not come into currency until after King's death "but it was King himself, as chair of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, who initiated the first successful national affirmative action campaign: "Operation Breadbasket."

In Atlanta, Philadelphia, Chicago and other cities, King staffers gathered data on the hiring patterns of corporations doing business in black communities, and called on companies to rectify disparities. "At present, SCLC has Operation Breadbasket functioning in some 12 cities, and the results have been remarkable," King wrote (quoted in Testament of Hope, James Washington, ed.), boasting of "800 new and upgraded jobs [and] several covenants with major industries."

King was well aware of the arguments used against affirmative action policies. As far back as 1964, he was writing in Why We Can't Wait: "Whenever the issue of compensatory treatment for the Negro is raised, some of our friends recoil in horror. The Negro should be granted equality, they agree; but he should ask nothing more. On the surface, this appears reasonable, but it is not realistic."

King supported affirmative action";type programs because he never confused the dream with American reality. As he put it, "A society that has done something special against the Negro for hundreds of years must now do something special for the Negro" to compete on a just and equal basis (quoted in Let the Trumpet Sound, by Stephen Oates).
In a 1965 Playboy interview, King compared affirmative action";style policies to the GI Bill: "Within common law we have ample precedents for special compensatory programs.... And you will remember that America adopted a policy of special treatment for her millions of veterans after the war."

In King's teachings, affirmative action approaches were not "reverse discrimination" or "racial preference." King promoted affirmative action not as preference for race over race (or gender over gender), but as a preference for inclusion, for equal oportunity, for real democracy. Nor was King's integration punitive: For him, integration benefited all Americans, male and female, white and non";white alike. And contrary to Gingrich, King insisted that, along with individual efforts, collective problems require collective solutions.

Like Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, King viewed affirmative action as a means to achieving a truly egalitarian and color";blind society. To destroy the means, the gradual process by which equality is achieved, destroys the dream itself. And the use of King's name in this enterprise only adds derision to destruction.

http://academic.udayton.edu/race/04needs/affirm25.htm


7S

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Re: Blacks and LSAT scores
« Reply #12 on: April 17, 2007, 01:19:18 PM »
Good luck trying to blame black people when you make rambling and incoherent arguments in class.

Well, if I follow Kanye's logic, I should go to a law school that is all white and will have no one to blame but other white people.  Incoherent logic?  Is asking for a level playing field and to be judged on the content of one's character instead of the color of their skin illogical?  Do you not see that this is the exact opposite of what the man who spoke those words intended? 

Let me get this straight. You're quoting Kanye West in your argument against affirmative action? That bogus man. Why would you go into depth with this on the Black Law Student Board?
It is easy to change the language of oppression without changing the sociopolitical situation of its victims.

Miss P

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Re: Blacks and LSAT scores
« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2007, 01:44:36 PM »
Tag.  Also, could someone contact Sands and ask him to move this to the AA board?
That's cool how you referenced a case.

Quote from: archival
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Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: Blacks and LSAT scores
« Reply #14 on: April 21, 2007, 11:44:47 AM »
Tag.  Also, could someone contact Sands and ask him to move this to the AA board?

done
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Miss P

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Re: Blacks and LSAT scores
« Reply #15 on: April 21, 2007, 01:29:59 PM »
Tag.  Also, could someone contact Sands and ask him to move this to the AA board?

done

Gracias.
That's cool how you referenced a case.

Quote from: archival
I'm so far from the end of my tether right now that I reckon I could knit myself some socks with the slack.

Sparkz1920

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Re: Blacks and LSAT scores
« Reply #16 on: April 22, 2007, 01:54:09 PM »
My friend from Cali did an internship at a nice firm in L.A. He didnt get paid for the internship, but they payed for his LSAT prep course

He still didnt score high. Waste of money if u ask me

Justiceforall

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Re: Blacks and LSAT scores
« Reply #17 on: April 29, 2007, 06:46:23 PM »
Well, I don't know much about the debate on minorities and standarized test;however, I refuse to believe one's color has anything to do with ones capacity on any given test. I think there are numerous other facts (sociological, psychological, class, the how rich the curriculum one attends in terms of fostering good test taking skills)... bottom line the LSAT is about skills...and the same way a emcee can sit at the kitchen table and hone his craft to rip a mic during a battle competition, the same way anyone can do well on that test.

I'm a proud descedent of people of color and I approve of this message. :)
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The LSAT score usually factors in about 60% of the reason a law school would or would not admit you..be safe ...get a perfect score-Me

BikePilot

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Re: Blacks and LSAT scores
« Reply #18 on: April 30, 2007, 03:16:08 PM »
Just FYI the kaplan course worked wonders for me, I'd highly recommend them. The course I took was quite diverse, with minorities probably being over-represented as compared to the general population demographics.

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