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Author Topic: Myth: Rutgers-N and Seton Hall = "Ghetto"  (Read 3167 times)

RobWreck

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Re: Myth: Rutgers-N and Seton Hall = "Ghetto"
« Reply #30 on: April 12, 2007, 03:17:52 PM »
Guys, you are completely spinning this the wrong way...

"Deciding on a career in Public Interest can be one of the most rewarding decisions a young law student can make. While many law schools talk about their public interest programs, Rutgers-Newark demonstrates its commitment to serving the public by its very location. No distant clinics that are only accessible to a select few, the law school is firmly rooted in the economically-challenged neighborhood of newark, providing ample opportunities for ALL of its students to interact with many potential clients. The varied opportunities a Rutgers-Newark student has to deal with the indigent and under-represented far exceed the those offered by many of the nation's most elite schools. The local flavor and color of the neighborhood are certain to enrich the education and awareness of of even the most worldly lawyer-to-be.
Come to Rutgers-Newark. See how the other half live!"


Now THAT'S Spin!
 ;D
Rob
St. John's University School of Law '11
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RUMike

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Re: Myth: Rutgers-N and Seton Hall = "Ghetto"
« Reply #31 on: April 12, 2007, 04:56:00 PM »
Oh man...this thread is great.

As a New Yorker/New Jerseyan my whole life, I'd never walk around Newark, Camden, or certain parts of NYC at night, but then again, do you really have reason to? If you go to SHU you can hop right on the PATH to a nice part of Jersey City, Hoboken, or Manhattan- where you should live and spend your social time.

But honestly, places in NJ have their reputations blown out of proportion. I've lived in New Brunswick for four years, and never once did I feel unsafe, ever, and if you ask any lay NJ person about it they'd start shaking in their boots. I have been approached by homeless people, but I've been approached outside of million dollar apartments in NYC too, it's just a matter of being an urban area. Take anything you hear about this kind of stuff with a grain of salt.

sarahlina

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Re: Myth: Rutgers-N and Seton Hall = "Ghetto"
« Reply #32 on: April 13, 2007, 11:35:50 AM »
As a young woman with not a lot of upper body strength, I definitley worry about my safety walking around at night.  That being said, I grew up in NYC and I definitley think I have good instincts and know how to take precautions.  If you are nervous about transitioning to an urban enviornment, you might want to consider taking a woman's self defense course.  A good class is not just kicking and screaming no.  The course I took taught me a lot about not being intimidated, how to handle harrasment or cat calling on the street, and not freezing up when you get scared of something.  Like I said, I grew up in NYC and have been basically riding the subway to "bad" neighborhoods for years - even with all my home grown instincts, my self defense class helped enormously with my comfort level and my perception of myself.  I would recommend it to any woman nervous about being in a big city or who just wants a little more confidence.

And to add to this thread, while my visits to Seton Hall and Newark were only for a couple of hours (and I'm sure there are worse parts of Newark to see), I really didn't get what the big deal was.  The blocks I walked on were crowded with students and police officers.  In fact, one of the students there complained that there were cops everywhere.  Doesn't eveyone say Temple is in a bad section of town too?  People deal with it and commute if they feel that uncomfortable.  Plus, if Newark is lame, you just take the train to NYC or Hoboken or whatever - it isn't like your trapped in "desolation."

jalong

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Re: Myth: Rutgers-N and Seton Hall = "Ghetto"
« Reply #33 on: April 13, 2007, 12:36:36 PM »
I worked in Newark for almost 5 years, knew lots of people who went to Rutgers and NJIT.

Newark is great.  People who are really afraid of Newark, I think have very little experience with urban areas and minorities.

The OP mentioned that there are no restaurants nearby SH and didn't seem to mention what's near Rutgers.

If you go to the opposite side of the train station from Seton Hall, you can (safely) find one of American's largest Portugese population and about 10 restaurants that are affordable and absolute amazing.  I took my fiance there (the neighborhood is called the Ironbound) because she was afraid of Newark.  She keeps mentioning how much she wants to go back there now.  That is walking distance from Seton Hall.  Newark also has a small subway, so from Penn Station there are plenty of other nice places to visit. 

To get to Rutgers, I would take the Newark Subway from Penn and then walk through the NJIT campus (it is a closed campus, for you safety nuts).  Right next to the RU law school building is a bar called McGovern's which is well attended by Rutgers students and people who work in the area.  They also have excellent hamburgers and other bar foods, and a very strong connection to the Irish community in Newark (which admittedly is not what it used to be, but you can say the same thing about Hell's Kitchen). Down the street from there, towards the Court House (oh yeah, did I mention there is a federal courthouse down the street) there is a place called the Side Bar where all of the lawyers go to eat between court appearances.

Now, let's be honest here.  Newark is not exactly the safest city in America, but just like in any city, your safety level is usually dependent on what kind of trouble you are getting yourself into.  Don't blame me if you get shot trying to score some coke in the hood or if you get beat up when you walk straight through a housing project.  But there are plenty of parts of the city, not just 500ft from Seton Hall that you can enjoy.  There are also plenty of places in New York and Philly and DC and probably every other real city that is a bad idea to just wander through.  My experience has been that if you don't bother anybody, nobody will bother you.

Not to mention that the cost of housing is next to zero, yet, for $1.50 you can take the PATH to NYC, and it runs 24/7. 

Newark is undergoing a renaissance.  I've been watching it happen and I think it is really great.  I am also partially disgusted and partially amused by would-be cause-lawyers who want to "help poor people" but are afraid of actually encountering any.
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Iceslip

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Re: Myth: Rutgers-N and Seton Hall = "Ghetto"
« Reply #34 on: April 13, 2007, 01:19:06 PM »
I worked in Newark for almost 5 years, knew lots of people who went to Rutgers and NJIT.

Newark is great.  People who are really afraid of Newark, I think have very little experience with urban areas and minorities.

The OP mentioned that there are no restaurants nearby SH and didn't seem to mention what's near Rutgers.

If you go to the opposite side of the train station from Seton Hall, you can (safely) find one of American's largest Portugese population and about 10 restaurants that are affordable and absolute amazing.  I took my fiance there (the neighborhood is called the Ironbound) because she was afraid of Newark.  She keeps mentioning how much she wants to go back there now.  That is walking distance from Seton Hall.  Newark also has a small subway, so from Penn Station there are plenty of other nice places to visit. 

To get to Rutgers, I would take the Newark Subway from Penn and then walk through the NJIT campus (it is a closed campus, for you safety nuts).  Right next to the RU law school building is a bar called McGovern's which is well attended by Rutgers students and people who work in the area.  They also have excellent hamburgers and other bar foods, and a very strong connection to the Irish community in Newark (which admittedly is not what it used to be, but you can say the same thing about Hell's Kitchen). Down the street from there, towards the Court House (oh yeah, did I mention there is a federal courthouse down the street) there is a place called the Side Bar where all of the lawyers go to eat between court appearances.

Now, let's be honest here.  Newark is not exactly the safest city in America, but just like in any city, your safety level is usually dependent on what kind of trouble you are getting yourself into.  Don't blame me if you get shot trying to score some coke in the hood or if you get beat up when you walk straight through a housing project.  But there are plenty of parts of the city, not just 500ft from Seton Hall that you can enjoy.  There are also plenty of places in New York and Philly and DC and probably every other real city that is a bad idea to just wander through.  My experience has been that if you don't bother anybody, nobody will bother you.

Not to mention that the cost of housing is next to zero, yet, for $1.50 you can take the PATH to NYC, and it runs 24/7. 

Newark is undergoing a renaissance.  I've been watching it happen and I think it is really great.  I am also partially disgusted and partially amused by would-be cause-lawyers who want to "help poor people" but are afraid of actually encountering any.


When I said there are no restaurants by Seton Hall, I meant in the immediate vicinity, relatively, there are FEW restaurants.  Of course you can provide a counter-example of the existence of a restaurant or a few restaurants, but the Ironbound section and the Portugese section are not "out the door" of Seton Hall...Seton hall is almost adjacent to Newark Penn Station and all I meant is that it is not like in NYC where you can go one block to find restaurants, delis, etc.  As for McGovern's...c'mon, you know that is really the only thing near Rutgers.  Most of the pizza shops, etc. are closed around there. 

Again, OF COURSE there are some places...for clarification, I meant that eats around Seton Hall and Rutgers are "sparse" to say the least...and also, almost all of these places close extremely early.  I mean, we're talking a city here, and in the main hub by raymond and the prudential building, even those starbucks, subway, etc. close at 7 p.m.!!  Haha I envision a lot of late nights in law school and of course this is veyr disappointing for a student population.  7 is extremely early.

Again, I apologize if you took what I said literally to the point of defending the fact that restaurants exist in Newark; that's like saying, "sure...minorities exist in Western PA."  Yeah, there was my family and about 2 others for a 100 mi., radius, but I wouldn't call that ample nor sufficient.

BeachBoy

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Re: Myth: Rutgers-N and Seton Hall = "Ghetto"
« Reply #35 on: April 13, 2007, 01:53:19 PM »
Newark isn't a ghetto.  Professonials work there during normal business hours.  True it's not the prettiest city out there but it's affordable.  In terms of safety, use common sense.  For men, don't expose your new $1000 rolex watch for people to easily see and for women, don't wear something that'll attract attention.  Other than that, taking some self defense courses will help also. 

ieatpoo

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Re: Myth: Rutgers-N and Seton Hall = "Ghetto"
« Reply #36 on: April 13, 2007, 06:08:48 PM »
Don Pepe's which is an amazing Portugese restaurant, is about 10 feet from Seton Hall.  I could jump from my classroom to the parking lot (which sometimes I feel like doing).  Also the Commerce Food Court is right across the street.  Many people working in the nearby office buildings go there for lunch.  They have amazing Chinese and Indian food (if you like that.)

ks2pa

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Re: Myth: Rutgers-N and Seton Hall = "Ghetto"
« Reply #37 on: April 13, 2007, 09:49:25 PM »
your "middle america" bashing is extremely obnoxious.

mathlete

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Re: Myth: Rutgers-N and Seton Hall = "Ghetto"
« Reply #38 on: April 13, 2007, 10:32:39 PM »
I hear the daily topics of Criminal Law classes at Rutgers-Newark are decided on a day-to-day basis by looking out the window :o

sarahlina

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Re: Myth: Rutgers-N and Seton Hall = "Ghetto"
« Reply #39 on: April 13, 2007, 10:42:40 PM »
Now, that is obnoxious