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Author Topic: IMUS vs. Sharpton  (Read 11494 times)

Tony Montana

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Re: IMUS vs. Sharpton
« Reply #20 on: April 10, 2007, 01:23:28 PM »


WRONG.  Jackson and Sharpton have been forever marginalized for their comments.  They will never have have a show like Imus, or be given the access and audience Imus has.  Much due in part to questionable comments they have made in the past and have NOT been forgiven for.  Imus on the other hand, gets a 2 week suspension.  and gets to talk about all his black freinds and black charity causes and comes off cleaner than he was before the incident.  


You must have forgotten--or don't know--that around 1984 Jesse Jackson called Jews "Hymies" and NYC "Hymietown” Yet, years later, had his own show on CNN that existed for a short period of time. The marginalizing that Jesse and Sharpton receive in mainstream society/media is the type of marginalizaing that is shared by most minority groups in this country.  How many other Black or Asian or Hispanic do you see in mainstream media in prominent roles?


If Imus heart is in the right place he'll lose his job and continue to do work for black causes.  

Of course he can...He can also have MORE of an impact using his current nationally syndicated show.


It just means that people are sick of being demeaned and degraded.  It means other people who have the sort of power Imus has will be more responsible with it.  I say make Imus the sacrificial lamb.  I've listened to him.  I don't think he is a bad guy, but got damn you have to be held accountable for the things you say.  


So, lets go after the guy that made a mistake with more vigor than the real bad guy(s)??

this doesn't matter?  I'm sorry I see no difference between Imus seeing these college educated extraiordinary black women as "napppy headed hos" as no different from police, or a potential employer looking at me as criminal or good for nothing because of the way I look (BLACK!).  This is a huge deal.  It has to do with how we are perceived in the world.  Its enough that it is just below the surface, by allowing Imus off scotch free basically you are giving a free pass to actually express what is just below the surface and further encourage the culture of pidgeonholing people in a negative manner.


No one said it doesn't matter, not even Imus.  And if you think his comment "as no different from police, or a potential employer looking at me as criminal or good for nothing because of the way I look (BLACK!)," you have lost perspective and are working off of emotion.  The difference between somebody having direct influence over your life and livelihood is different than a radio show hosts' offensive remarks
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Tony Montana

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Re: IMUS vs. Sharpton
« Reply #21 on: April 10, 2007, 01:30:05 PM »
I actually watch Imus every morning and generally liked the guy, and yes he does a lot of good things.  I really don't think he should be fired.  Having said this though, can I get a big "gettahellouttahere" to the people who try to turn this around on Sharpton and Jesse. If Jessee and Sharpton said questionable things, they should have been made to pay the piper as well but dont' try to divert this on them, or rappers, or the wobbly rotational axis of the earth.   

Oh and to answer this:

There are plenty of more important issues

Well ofcourse there are, and there will always be, but does that mean that all issues that are of lesser importance must be ignored? Taken to its logical conclusion only the ONE single "most important issue" will ever get dealt with (whatever that may be)

I'm not familiar with imus or his show, but the media hype made me think of the whole kramer spectacle. i think that white people get more out of the public outcrys against individual acts of racism, at least psychologically. my thought on it is that by rebuking imus in the media, forcing him to apologize etc. and by making a big spectacle out of his racist/sexist comments it makes them feel like they are anti-racist, hiding of course the privilege that is inherent in whitness. it also implies, and this is just my theory, that the u.s. is a racial democracy because individual acts of racism are taboo and not permitted in the public sphere. White folks get to act righteous by attacking imus, they simultaneously mark public acts of individual racism as the only vestige of americas racist past. This masks the systemic racism that still exists under the veneer of a color-blind racial democracy.

thats just my two cents, of course i also agree that racism/sexism should not be tolerated in any way.  however i do wish that these events that rupture the myth of racial democracy would be taken as points of departure into deeper discussions race and institutional racism.

Agree with most of what you said here...
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Re: IMUS vs. Sharpton
« Reply #22 on: April 10, 2007, 01:30:45 PM »
AND why is it, when a white celebrity says something tinted with racism he apologizes to Al Sharpton or Jesse Jackson. Are they the mouthpiece for Black America?

As far as whitey is concerned they are our mouthpeice.  Or they are as far as they are willing to travel into the black community to convey a message.  

Further, this comparison being drawn to rappers is beyond silly.  Imus called out the Rutgers girls basketball team.  Rappers give fictionalized accounts of anonymous people.  Huge difference.  Alot of black women listen to hip hop hear female dog being said and say they aren't talking about me.  Rutgers girls basketball team had no choice but to know that they were the ones being talked about, and that they were being ostracized based on stereotypes about how people look.  There is such a large difference here.  

And people criticize rappers like they are the only ones demeaning women, and like black women are the only ones they demean.  Thats untrue.  White men demean all types of women for the almighty dollar.  Any look at a billboard or magazine attests to this.  White women are demeaned daily.  

I don't fight against because I like rap.  If a rapper calls a girl a female dog its generally within the context of the song.  If your saying i got hoes in different area codes you are rapping about girls youve slept with everywhere.  those are the hoes.  and if you are a groupie that got banged out during a flights layover I'm not arguing with someone calling you a hoe.  sorry.  there is just a huge difference between rap music and don imus.  i cant beleive people are so intellectually rigid.        

The Tragicomic: Itís embodied in the blues, jazz, (HIP HOP, CORNELL <<one slight deserves another!!!!<< REALLY MISSED THE BOAT ON THAT ONE!!!) and the African experience in the New World -- the ability to withstand terrorism, embrace oneís worst enemies lovingly and bear the unbearable in song.

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Re: IMUS vs. Sharpton
« Reply #23 on: April 10, 2007, 01:43:11 PM »
"The difference between somebody having direct influence over your life and livelihood is different than a radio show host Ďs offensive remarks"

one person is stereotyping me based on my looks, and another is stereotyping some women based on the same.  I see no difference.  Weird that you see no difference between Imus and rappers, but see a difference between two sets of people being discriminated against based on appearence.  bottomline: stereotyping people based on appearence is wrong.  Imus did this to Rutgers women, and cops and potential employers do the same to me.  imus and those cops are cut from the same cloth.  I see no difference.  And when you encourage Imus, and allow him to continue doing what he is doing, it sends the wrong message to the people who do hold sway over my life in some way or another. 
The Tragicomic: Itís embodied in the blues, jazz, (HIP HOP, CORNELL <<one slight deserves another!!!!<< REALLY MISSED THE BOAT ON THAT ONE!!!) and the African experience in the New World -- the ability to withstand terrorism, embrace oneís worst enemies lovingly and bear the unbearable in song.

Tony Montana

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Re: IMUS vs. Sharpton
« Reply #24 on: April 10, 2007, 02:24:15 PM »
"The difference between somebody having direct influence over your life and livelihood is different than a radio show host ‘s offensive remarks"

one person is stereotyping me based on my looks, and another is stereotyping some women based on the same.  I see no difference.  

The difference is one (Imus) is exploiting stereotypes for humor.  The other (employer/police) has a direct influence over your life. Example:  Police can use stereotyping to profile you driving down the street, Imus cant.  Your employer can use stereotyping to discriminate against you on the job, a radio show host can't


Weird that you see no difference between Imus and rappers,  

I never made that argument.  I think you need to check my posts again...you have me mistaken for someone else.


bottomline: stereotyping people based on appearence is wrong.  Imus did this to Rutgers women, and cops and potential employers do the same to me. imus and those cops are cut from the same cloth.  I see no difference.  And when you encourage Imus, and allow him to continue doing what he is doing, it sends the wrong message to the people who do hold sway over my life in some way or another.  


Of course it is wrong... no matter who it is...  But to CONFLATE the consequences between a radio talk show host stereotyping v employers/police is problematic.  Although Imus may have a physiological influence on people--if people took his banter seriously--he can't bust your ass and get away with it like a street cop can. Or fire you like your employer can.  Big difference.
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LadyKD

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Re: IMUS vs. Sharpton
« Reply #25 on: April 10, 2007, 02:25:21 PM »
_BP_ I am the one that asked what has Al Sharpton done...and your answer is very vague so I decided to go to his website for his organization National Action Network. First off the name says Action. So far in reviewing this site I have yet to see any action. Lots of talk...lots of press for Big Perm. But no action. There are photo shots and info on radio show programs but actions...not so much. I found that are working to help education black people in Harlem about Home Ownership..but heck so is the NAACP, Urban League, The Ques, The Deltas, The Zeta's and Habitiat Hummanity So where is all this good work he is doing?

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Re: IMUS vs. Sharpton
« Reply #26 on: April 10, 2007, 02:57:33 PM »
maybe i did confuse you w/someone else.  nonetheless, I do not see a difference.  Of course, one directly affects me and another does not.  I am not conflating anything however.  Like I said, Imus stereotypes people and cops stereotype people.  If I want cops to stop stereotyping me it is not an issue between just me an cops.  we do not exist in vacuo.  my issue is with everyone who stereotypes. 
The Tragicomic: Itís embodied in the blues, jazz, (HIP HOP, CORNELL <<one slight deserves another!!!!<< REALLY MISSED THE BOAT ON THAT ONE!!!) and the African experience in the New World -- the ability to withstand terrorism, embrace oneís worst enemies lovingly and bear the unbearable in song.

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Re: IMUS vs. Sharpton
« Reply #27 on: April 10, 2007, 03:06:35 PM »
_BP_ I am the one that asked what has Al Sharpton done...and your answer is very vague so I decided to go to his website for his organization National Action Network. First off the name says Action. So far in reviewing this site I have yet to see any action. Lots of talk...lots of press for Big Perm. But no action. There are photo shots and info on radio show programs but actions...not so much. I found that are working to help education black people in Harlem about Home Ownership..but heck so is the NAACP, Urban League, The Ques, The Deltas, The Zeta's and Habitiat Hummanity So where is all this good work he is doing?

I really never attempted to answer the question of what Sharpton has done for the black community. Are you really being serious with this question?

On another note, you wrote:
I found that  are working to help education black people in Harlem about Home Ownership..but heck so is the NAACP, Urban League, The Ques, The Deltas, The Zeta's and Habitiat Hummanity So where is all this good work he is doing?

Okay, let's make your argument a principle and see if it holds: The only way a contribution can be counted as being meaningful is if there is no other person/organization presently pursuing the same outcome. Does that work? So as far as Imus raising funds for sickle cell anemia, so is the American Sickle Cell Anemia Association, Peninsula Association for Sickle Cell, and countless other organizations. So where is all this good work he is doing? (Can't find an emoticon to fit)




  

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Re: IMUS vs. Sharpton
« Reply #28 on: April 10, 2007, 03:58:28 PM »
I don't fight against because I like rap.

And that is the same justifcation, white people use when the justify the idocies of Howard Stern.

Rappers give fictionalized accounts of anonymous people.

Those fictionalized accounts are not of anonymous people. If specification is the issue, then by NOT specifying, wouldn't you, by default, include the general population of women? If Strom Thurmond says, "I hate n*ggers," should I not be offended because he didn't say my name specifically?

We live in white dominated society. And equally, we live in a male dominated society. We, as blacks, justifiably, find grievance when a member of the white consortium makes a remark that is racially offensive. So how in the same breath, as black men, can we expect women to sanction misogynism from the male-dominated rap game?

White men demean all types of women for the almighty dollar.  Any look at a billboard or magazine attests to this.  White women are demeaned daily.

AS IF that gives us a free pass to do the same thing.

My argument isn't based on intellectual rigidness. It is directed at intellectual hypocrisy. And I should clarify, not all rap music is misogynistic. Some rap music is thoughtful and artistic, but radio doesn't play that.

The variables may differ, but what Imus did to those women equates to what mainstream rap music consistently does to all women.
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LadyKD

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Re: IMUS vs. Sharpton
« Reply #29 on: April 10, 2007, 04:35:13 PM »
I really never attempted to answer the question of what Sharpton has done for the black community. Are you really being serious with this question?


Yes, I am quite serious. Enlighten me to the good works of Big Perm.