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Author Topic: Score bands  (Read 1872 times)

seankenn

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Score bands
« on: September 15, 2004, 01:00:01 PM »
What do you all think of score bands?  I think they are worthless.  When I took the test I scored a 158 which in my opinion was the worst I was going to do.  But they report a band of 155-161.  Leading adcomms to believe I could potentially score lower than I did.  But in my head my band really should be 158-164.  Do you think Adcomms decisions are seriously affected by these bands?

nathanielmark

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Re: Score bands
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2004, 01:01:09 PM »
actually, score bands allow you to pick any LSAT score in your range.  so, if you score a 165, you can tell schools you scored a 168 on applications.

Casper

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Re: Score bands
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2004, 01:04:05 PM »
The score bands gives the adcomm more latitude in selecting their students.  So, they might decide to let you in, even though you scored less on lsat, compared to other students. 

It's taken from HR employment practices in which government moved from band of 3 (top 3 scores are offered employment), to score band (those who scored within range, are offered employment). 
Drawing dead, serving 25 to life.

rwhitman

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Re: Score bands
« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2004, 01:04:55 PM »
actually, score bands allow you to pick any LSAT score in your range.  so, if you score a 165, you can tell schools you scored a 168 on applications.

Actually I don't think this is true. I think the law school can clearly see the lsat score and the exact percentile from lsac and that you will look like a liar if you write down a different number.

nathanielmark

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Re: Score bands
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2004, 01:05:52 PM »
actually, score bands allow you to pick any LSAT score in your range.  so, if you score a 165, you can tell schools you scored a 168 on applications.

Actually I don't think this is true. I think the law school can clearly see the lsat score and the exact percentile from lsac and that you will look like a liar if you write down a different number.

Wrong. as long as you report a score in your range, you are fine.

seankenn

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Re: Score bands
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2004, 01:06:15 PM »
But on the report it states your band and then the actual score.  So stating the highest on the application will not really help in anyway. My gripe still is that if someone score in the lower half of their "band", as I did, they assume that this is test taker's median score.

absy

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Re: Score bands
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2004, 01:24:33 PM »
This is not really true.  What they mean with the score band is that they can say with 66% confidence (I believe that was the percentage) that your true score falls within that score band.  So in that respect, it is correct.

nathanielmark

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Re: Score bands
« Reply #7 on: September 15, 2004, 01:24:59 PM »
This is not really true.  What they mean with the score band is that they can say with 66% confidence (I believe that was the percentage) that your true score falls within that score band.  So in that respect, it is correct.

exactly

cascagrossa

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Re: Score bands
« Reply #8 on: September 15, 2004, 01:39:02 PM »
can anyone else confirm that you can list a score 3 points higher than the one you actually earned?

it doesnt seem right to me.

absy

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Re: Score bands
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2004, 01:44:36 PM »
I was referring to the post directly above mine, not to the absurd suggestion that you should list a score other than the specific one earned on test day.