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Author Topic: GPA  (Read 865 times)

sahrunner86

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GPA
« on: April 04, 2007, 05:18:34 PM »
what gpa requires an addendum? How low of a gpa do you have to have that you should write one? Do you need to write one if you have less than a 3.0? 2.5? Considering that Im not applying to top 20 schools..but all top 100.

thanks for the help!

hmm

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Re: GPA
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2007, 05:31:15 PM »
It's not so much a question of how low your GPA is, but whether or not there are extenuating circumstances that affected it. If your GPA is low because you are lazy or just not a very good student (not saying you are) then an addendum probably won't help. On the other hand, even if you have a relatively good GPA, but there is a (good) reason it's not as high as it could be, you might still write an addendum. Good reasons to provide additional information about your GPA might include a serious illness, a death in the family, beginning in a major that really didn't suit you, etc. The important point is that there needs to be some evidence that what you claim in your addendum is true. So, for instance, if you claim that your GPA is low because of an illness, your case will be greatly improved if you can point to semesters in which you were healthy and performed well.

The bottom line is this: an addendum is supposed to provide additional clarification that may not be obvious from your numerical data. If there is nothing to say, then there is no reason to write an addendum, even if your GPA (or LSAT or whatever) isn't satisfactory.

sahrunner86

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Re: GPA
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2007, 05:42:01 PM »
It's not so much a question of how low your GPA is, but whether or not there are extenuating circumstances that affected it. If your GPA is low because you are lazy or just not a very good student (not saying you are) then an addendum probably won't help. On the other hand, even if you have a relatively good GPA, but there is a (good) reason it's not as high as it could be, you might still write an addendum. Good reasons to provide additional information about your GPA might include a serious illness, a death in the family, beginning in a major that really didn't suit you, etc. The important point is that there needs to be some evidence that what you claim in your addendum is true. So, for instance, if you claim that your GPA is low because of an illness, your case will be greatly improved if you can point to semesters in which you were healthy and performed well.

The bottom line is this: an addendum is supposed to provide additional clarification that may not be obvious from your numerical data. If there is nothing to say, then there is no reason to write an addendum, even if your GPA (or LSAT or whatever) isn't satisfactory.


To be specific, my gpa overall is just under a 3.0 which would put me in the 25th percentile area of most top 100 schools. And I havent took the LSAT officially..but I've done practice tests and score in the upper 150s and Im hoping to get into a top 100 school in the northeast. But my gpa isnt low because of illness, death, or family issues.. its only low because I may have disagreed with professors or just didnt adequately prepare.. I wasnt sure if i needed to write something about the gpa since it was under a 3.0


iscoredawaitlist

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Re: GPA
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2007, 05:46:58 PM »
disagreed with professors so you got low grades? I think it's that kind of immaturity that law schools won't want. You'll have some troubles. Get your LSAT into the 160s and you have a shot, i'd think.

sahrunner86

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Re: GPA
« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2007, 05:49:30 PM »
Im hoping to have it in the low 160s..im taking the kaplan prep course this summer so my practice lsat 158 should go in that area hopefully and be a big help overall.

hmm

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Re: GPA
« Reply #5 on: April 04, 2007, 05:52:03 PM »
It's not so much a question of how low your GPA is, but whether or not there are extenuating circumstances that affected it. If your GPA is low because you are lazy or just not a very good student (not saying you are) then an addendum probably won't help. On the other hand, even if you have a relatively good GPA, but there is a (good) reason it's not as high as it could be, you might still write an addendum. Good reasons to provide additional information about your GPA might include a serious illness, a death in the family, beginning in a major that really didn't suit you, etc. The important point is that there needs to be some evidence that what you claim in your addendum is true. So, for instance, if you claim that your GPA is low because of an illness, your case will be greatly improved if you can point to semesters in which you were healthy and performed well.

The bottom line is this: an addendum is supposed to provide additional clarification that may not be obvious from your numerical data. If there is nothing to say, then there is no reason to write an addendum, even if your GPA (or LSAT or whatever) isn't satisfactory.


To be specific, my gpa overall is just under a 3.0 which would put me in the 25th percentile area of most top 100 schools. And I havent took the LSAT officially..but I've done practice tests and score in the upper 150s and Im hoping to get into a top 100 school in the northeast. But my gpa isnt low because of illness, death, or family issues.. its only low because I may have disagreed with professors or just didnt adequately prepare.. I wasnt sure if i needed to write something about the gpa since it was under a 3.0


FWIW, I wouldn't provide any additional information if I were in your position. If you score in upper 170s you might have a chance at a t14 school (nu in particular seems to take high lsat low gpa splitters); if you score in the 160s or above, I'm sure you could find someone in the top 100 to take you. Also, you might want to think about Testmasters, Powerscore, Blueprint, etc. instead of Kaplan.

sahrunner86

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Re: GPA
« Reply #6 on: April 04, 2007, 05:57:35 PM »
have you used any of the other test prep services besides Kaplan? how did that work out for you? Is there something wrong with going with kaplan?

hmm

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Re: GPA
« Reply #7 on: April 04, 2007, 06:17:02 PM »
have you used any of the other test prep services besides Kaplan? how did that work out for you? Is there something wrong with going with kaplan?

The companies I named--Testmasters, Powerscore, Blueprint, and maybe a few others--are commonly regarded as the best LSAT prep providers. I personally used Testmasters. In retrospect, I think I could have done just as well studying on my own; nonetheless, I was pretty pleased with the quality of the course. I think you will find fewer people who are satisfied with Kaplan. Kaplan does not have the same standards for instructors as the other companies; does not provide as many hours of instruction; and is not much cheaper. In my opinion, if you are going to take a course, at least look into someone besides Kaplan and Princeton Review.

Ravynous Elegance

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Re: GPA
« Reply #8 on: April 04, 2007, 06:20:53 PM »
have you used any of the other test prep services besides Kaplan? how did that work out for you? Is there something wrong with going with kaplan?

The companies I named--Testmasters, Powerscore, Blueprint, and maybe a few others--are commonly regarded as the best LSAT prep providers. I personally used Testmasters. In retrospect, I think I could have done just as well studying on my own; nonetheless, I was pretty pleased with the quality of the course. I think you will find fewer people who are satisfied with Kaplan. Kaplan does not have the same standards for instructors as the other companies; does not provide as many hours of instruction; and is not much cheaper. In my opinion, if you are going to take a course, at least look into someone besides Kaplan and Princeton Review.

the only real difference between them is their method and the fact that kaplan takes 95th percentile and up while testmasters takes only 98th and up. Kaplan happens to be almost everywhere however, so they are generally the most convenient. I teach for Kaplan, and I was actually offered a job with powerscore even though i'm in like the 97.6th percentile (169). Kaplan payed more... so I went with them. However, the training was decently rigorous and only 2 of us passed, so I wouldnt say that Kaplan has low standards...
Vanderbilt University School of Law 2010

sahrunner86

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Re: GPA
« Reply #9 on: April 04, 2007, 06:24:41 PM »
Oh ok.. i wasnt so sure of the other test prep services because I've really only heard of kaplan and Princeton review.. but i will look into the others..

also... im really interested in going to a law school in NYC... considering my gpa just under 3.0 and high 150s/low 160s likely lsat anybody have suggestions?? I know New York Law School looks pretty good for a safe bet..anybody know about NYLS?? thanks!