Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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Poll

Fordham 1st choice, then Cardozo, considering my #s what would you suggest between Cardozo and NYLS?

Brooklyn Law - FT
 9 (60%)
Seton Hall - FT
 1 (6.7%)
Brooklyn Law - PT
 2 (13.3%)
Seton Hall - PT
 3 (20%)

Total Members Voted: 14

Voting closed: April 16, 2007, 11:02:12 PM

Author Topic: New York Law School... NYC law schools  (Read 6970 times)

sahrunner86

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #70 on: April 16, 2007, 12:36:04 AM »
oh yeah, and the money... the fact that Im willing to take that much in loans shows that I do care about quality legal education.

And also, those of you posting a few of you I believe said you are at or considered brooklyn, st johns, seton, etc... which would be hypocritical for you to be saying Im not aware of the financial end.

and to be honest, its true I dont care what it costs- i want to go to the best law school that I can get into and i dont care what it costs. If i get in and theres a loan to cover it, then it works for me.

notengoplata

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #71 on: April 16, 2007, 01:10:56 AM »
Ok, right - But what are the number of reasons you would not apply to Rutgers-Newark?

You have obviously not researched this enough given the amount of ridiculous things you have been saying (i.e, queens is all the way across the city, you are going to make 100,000 dollars when you get out of school doing public interest/social justice work, etc).

The idea is to get out of school on the cheap - did your parents not raise you with a work ethic or a concept of money? YOU DO KNOW YOU HAVE TO PAY THESE LOANS BACK SO WHY NOT DO IT AS CHEAPLY AS POSSIBLE. There are countless state schools (Rutgers being one of them) that are super cheap, and have a fantastic reputation - but you are more concerned with living in soho, tribeca, or the village in manhattan and being a real NY lawyer!.

Seriously, do you think i don't meet people like you every day?

Stay away from NY please, we need less, not more people like you here.

I think you also said you prefer "above ground" transportation. Seriously, good luck getting from point A to point B using the bus in manhattan. 

In Infernos Dicet

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #72 on: April 16, 2007, 10:35:34 AM »
I think you also said you prefer "above ground" transportation. Seriously, good luck getting from point A to point B using the bus in manhattan. 

or a car. Parking will kill you (both cruising around for a parking spot while your class started or paying for a spot at a garage)

notengoplata

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #73 on: April 16, 2007, 10:49:07 AM »
x50v,

Obviously, I am sure you agree there is NO POINT to ever have a car in Manhattan. Brooklyn,Queens, etc - a different story. This thread really is laughable.

sahrunner86

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #74 on: April 16, 2007, 10:57:01 AM »
Ok, right - But what are the number of reasons you would not apply to Rutgers-Newark?

You have obviously not researched this enough given the amount of ridiculous things you have been saying (i.e, queens is all the way across the city, you are going to make 100,000 dollars when you get out of school doing public interest/social justice work, etc).

The idea is to get out of school on the cheap - did your parents not raise you with a work ethic or a concept of money? YOU DO KNOW YOU HAVE TO PAY THESE LOANS BACK SO WHY NOT DO IT AS CHEAPLY AS POSSIBLE. There are countless state schools (Rutgers being one of them) that are super cheap, and have a fantastic reputation - but you are more concerned with living in soho, tribeca, or the village in manhattan and being a real NY lawyer!.

Seriously, do you think i don't meet people like you every day?

Stay away from NY please, we need less, not more people like you here.

I think you also said you prefer "above ground" transportation. Seriously, good luck getting from point A to point B using the bus in manhattan. 



First, I never said I expected to make 100,000 doing public interest work. I believe what I said is that was the figure given in nyls's employment stats for private practice work for their graduates. I understand that public interest is like 40-50 on a high figure.

above ground- lets see, there are buses, the elevated train, cabs, the two legs you were born with, etc, or if the subway really is fine then that would work too. From my experiences living in buffalo, the subway was definantly not fine there and there were other ways to get around- and buffalo is the 2nd largest city in NY to NYC.

I have since realized the distance between manhattan and the surrounding boroughs as well, you do not need to repeat something that has already been clarified numerous times.

And with being cheap- you know private schools do give scholarships and grants and various other aid too! I've attended a private college throughout undergrad and I have no more loans than friends of mine at other state schools. Understanding law school is no where near the same, but private schools do tend to make up the difference in aid.

And rutgers newark- well, first there are two rutgers law schools; camden & newark, and newark seems to be the lower of the two. Then, R-N seems to be focusing on it being cheap, flexible scheduling, and catering to the "adult" law students who have been in the workplace for years. I dont think rutgers newark is a top pick for very many people coming straight out of undergrad who want to go full time.

sahrunner86

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #75 on: April 16, 2007, 10:59:09 AM »
x50v,

Obviously, I am sure you agree there is NO POINT to ever have a car in Manhattan. Brooklyn,Queens, etc - a different story. This thread really is laughable.

I said nothing about a car. Its laughable because you are adding to what I wrote- I said the subway is bad in buffalo and if its like it was in buffalo in new york than another mode of transportation might be preferred- nothing in that suggests a car.

notengoplata

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #76 on: April 16, 2007, 11:16:25 AM »
The "elevated train" hahaha. What are you talking about?

Good luck paying for a cab every single day to get to class on your student loans, cus you don't care, you live in ny and go to law school and by god, you are going to enjoy yourself!

Listen, if you want to go anywhere in Manhattan - you need to take the Subway. It's not bad. I use it everyday, so do millions of other people. The fact that you even have doubts about it is laughable.

Furthermore, you are wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong about Rutgers-Newark. Plenty of people coming out of undergrad would kill to go to Rutgers-Newark - particularly because it has a great reputation and it is cost effective. Furthermore, in spite of what you think, it's right next to NYC - and hardly anyone who goes to school there actually lives in Newark. They live all over NJ - including places like Jersey City and Hoboken - which are right next to it (and also right next to NYC).  By no means does this school cater specifically to "adult" students. whatever that means.


Regardless, you did in fact state that you expected to make around 100,000 dollars a year. go back and look. Please, go to Boston or something.

Why risk attending a school like Seton Hall  when you can attend Rutgers-Newark for significantly cheaper? - (the difference in employment and bar passage rates are negligible and the reputation is pretty much the same).


keelee

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #77 on: April 16, 2007, 11:52:46 AM »
The "elevated train" hahaha. What are you talking about?

He has probably watched Spiderman 2 one too many times.

I love how because the Subway (which is really a light rail train running through a small tunnel) in Buffalo is "dangerous", then the one in New York City automatically is too.
Going to as of now...USC or Fordham.

sahrunner86

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #78 on: April 16, 2007, 12:01:19 PM »
elevated train, ok so i got that one mixed up- there is an elevated train system in chicago- not new york.

and I looked up your so favored rutgers newark in comparison to seton hall... As I am not a New Jersey resident it would be 25,000 for full time out of state tuition at rutgers compared to 32,000 at seton hall..thats a difference of 7,000 a year and 21,000 over 3 years. That is a minor difference overall and if seton hall is like most private schools that difference of 7,000 would be made up in more financial aid from endowment in the forms of scholarships and grants. Additionally, I'm sure firms know that people coming out of a more costly law school have more debt to pay off after graduation and i'd imagine this is considered when your salary is decided.

notengoplata

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #79 on: April 16, 2007, 12:07:11 PM »
You are an idiot.And Delusional. What makes you think they actually care? Do you actually think you would get payed more because they feel sorry for you because you have more debt to pay off? Are you mental?

I dunno, but to me, 21,000 dollars is a huge amount of money - and I would be glad to not have to pay it off over the course of several years. In addition, your tuition would be significantly lower if you were to become a resident of the state of NJ. You can't be a real person. Real people don't think like this.

w/r/t the elevated train. I completely understand. NY and Chicago are right next to each other, and sometimes I mistake them for one another when I am taking the elevated train to work. Also, sometimes, when I am walking down Broadway I imagine I am actually wading in the Nile River.