Law School Discussion

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Fordham 1st choice, then Cardozo, considering my #s what would you suggest between Cardozo and NYLS?

Brooklyn Law - FT
 9 (60%)
Seton Hall - FT
 1 (6.7%)
Brooklyn Law - PT
 2 (13.3%)
Seton Hall - PT
 3 (20%)

Total Members Voted: 14

Voting closed: April 16, 2007, 11:02:12 PM

Author Topic: New York Law School... NYC law schools  (Read 7089 times)

notengoplata

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #50 on: April 14, 2007, 11:31:49 AM »
"Queens is all the way across the city"

What does that even mean?

So funny. First of all, if you are going to consider NJ schools - I would seriously, seriously, seriously, consider Rutgers-Newark over Seton Hall for obvious reasons. The Rutgers system is fantastic - has a fantastic reputation - while there numbers might be *slightly* below that of Seton Hall's I seriously doubt it affects your job prospects. People overanalyze this stuff way too much. Beyond that, the tuition is nearly half of what Seton Hall's is and if you get in state tuition after a year or so, it's a third of what it is.  ALSO - you can live in Jersey City - which is by no means a slum, or unhip - it is an awesome place to live - and about a 7 minute train ride from manhattan - full of restauraunts and bars and things to do. but whatever, you think you are going to find a nice one bedroom in tribeca - since you are so knowledgeable and have been to manhattan a handful of times.

You don't have to live in Newark and go to school at Rutgers or Seton Hall. You need to look at a map - and make a trip to NYC/NJ to seriously examine all your options and actually learn the lay of the land. Where are you from anyway?


Boyce Baylor

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #51 on: April 14, 2007, 12:44:52 PM »
Are the PT programs really that much easier to get into? A 2.9 159 would have almost zero shot of getting into the Carzozo full-time program, and literally none at Fordham. How does this part-time thing work? Are these programs prevalent at other schools? Is it something worth considering?

sahrunner86

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #52 on: April 14, 2007, 02:50:26 PM »
Are the PT programs really that much easier to get into? A 2.9 159 would have almost zero shot of getting into the Carzozo full-time program, and literally none at Fordham. How does this part-time thing work? Are these programs prevalent at other schools? Is it something worth considering?

well, i obviously cant say for sure bc i havent been admitted yet or even applied until october. But, from what it shows on lsac, many higher ranked schools have pt programs with much lower numbers.

sahrunner86

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #53 on: April 14, 2007, 03:03:42 PM »
Maybe queens is the same distance by train, but it doesnt look that way when you look at a map. Regardless, I am not interested in st johns so queens doesnt make much impact on this anyway. I'll strongly look into applying to brooklyn  & seton hall both pt in addition to fordham, cardozo, and nyls (still absolute last). I'm also still applying to the masters program in public administration at nyu & new school.

Where am I from? - I lived in Cape May, NJ for several years but have been in south florida most recently. I also went to college for some of the time in buffalo, ny.

Im not interested in applying to rutgers newark, for a number of reasons.

additionally, I think there has been enough comments just generally disagreeing and saying that i am naive. I have looked into this as much as possible short of actually going in person. If you disagree show some kind of evidence as to why.

sahrunner86

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #54 on: April 14, 2007, 03:26:24 PM »
also, you are probably thinking that im only applying to the schools that i listed on here- which would be incorrect. I am applying to around 10 schools, although they are all in the northeast- pittsburgh, syracuse, boston, nyc area, etc. I just would prefer to go to new york.

notengoplata

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #55 on: April 14, 2007, 06:12:20 PM »
I don't understand how you can say that by looking at a map - queens doesn't look close to manhattan. It is literally adjacent to it - like all boroughs, except for Staten Island.

Furthermore, without a doubt, you are absolutely naive about a number of things - including:

1) The geography of NYC
2) The amount of money you will make when you get out of school (there is a big different between 100,000 and 70,000 particularly when you are living in a city as expensive as NYC)
3) What it is like to live in manhattan and commute to Brooklyn.


Also, in my opinion, you seem to be operating under the assumption that "the city" is limited to Manhattan and all the other boroughs are not worth going to. You have said you have never been to Brooklyn - go take a look at Park Slope, it's awesome. Go take a look at Jersey City, NJ. Go look at the kinds of apartments you would be able to get in both of those places and compare them to the quality and price of the apartments you would get for the same amount in most of the neighborhoods you mentioned in Manhattan. You are simply being naive.

Furthermore, i'd looooooove to hear why you would apply to Seton Hall and not Rutgers-Newark. You seem like you have money to burn. Rutgers is a fantastic school - and with a 158 you would probably have a good shot at getting in - not sure about the 2.9 though.


nyclivin

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #56 on: April 15, 2007, 12:24:41 PM »
This may be one of the funniest threads i've seen on LSD.  Time and time again, a non-NYC native has been told by people that have lived there their entire lives that they are wrong, yet still thinks he/she is right.  What is even funnier is this person with a 2.9 and most likely sub 160 scores even thinks they have a shot at pt at Cardozo or Brooklyn.

Unless the poster has some great activities, or has a 2.9 from a top-20 undergrad institution, I can't see any of these schools offering admission.  With all due respect for the admissions system, the lower end of the pt programs are either URM or extremly unique students.  The higher end tend to be the FT waitlist students who will transfer to FT from PT after a semester or year.  Some people just don't realize how competitive it is to get into these VERY good schools in NYC.

I've lived in Northern NJ/NYC my entire life and I plan on living in Hoboken.  It will be an easy commute to and from the city at much less cost.  Plus, you can't beat the neighborhood feel that you get in Hoboken (or sections of Brooklyn for that matter).

At this point I hope the poster goes to NYLS and pays the overpriced Manhattan rent.  If he/she isn't willing to listen to people who know what they are talking about, he/she deserves what's coming.

Journeyman

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #57 on: April 15, 2007, 12:50:04 PM »
I dunno...the OP's NYC dreams kinda remind me of the dreams of millions of Mexicans that come to this country each year hoping for that "good life"
IU-B '10

Journeyman, I am dumbfounded as to how you got into IU and W&L with your numbers. 155 LSAT and you applied to Vanderbilt? Honestly?

linquest

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #58 on: April 15, 2007, 07:12:17 PM »
OP- I had similar numbers to yours and did not get into Cardozo, but I knew that would be a longshot.  Cardozo is a notorious LSAT whore.  I think you need to be closer to 162 to be in the running there, even for the PT program.  Also, you really need to find out what your real LSAT score is before you finalize your list of schools.  Like you, my practice scores were in the 160-3 range, but I could never get near it on the real thing.

Having lived in both Brooklyn (1 subway stop from BLS) and Queens, I have to echo the many other posters that have said you seem to have a naive outlook about commuting in NYC.  If it's the MTA map that you're looking at that gives you the impression that Queens is waaaaaay out there, remember that that map isn't to scale (for example, Staten Island is smaller than Manhattan on the map but is actually 5x the land mass).  I DO think commuting from St. John's might be a little more of a trek, but getting to/from Manhattan from BLS would actually be quicker than traveling to many other neighborhoods w/in Manhattan.

Also agree that your impression of Public Interest salaries is fairly inaccurate.  Most federal agencies pay in 40-$50Ks starting range, states less, and municipalities even less.  Public interest firms are also almost all small firms, where $50-65K is the top range.  My school graduates more PI attorneys than probably any other school in the country and I've never heard of any of them starting in the 6-figure range.
Fed gov't atty

In Infernos Dicet

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Re: New York Law School... NYC law schools
« Reply #59 on: April 15, 2007, 08:05:43 PM »
What everyone else said. This thread is highly amusing for me mainly because I lived in NYC all my life and I love to hear people yap about law schools in NYC and have no idea of what NYC's geography is like.

I grew up near St. Johns, went to college around Cardozo and plan on heading to Brooklyn Law this fall (unless I get off Fordham WL) so I fancy myself an expert on getting around the city. It takes me about 15 mins to get into midtown or lower Manhattan by car. 30 minutes to midtown with the E/F train, 45 minutes to Soho and about a hour to BLS (accounting for subway transfers.) It also takes me about 15 minutes to get from BLS to Union Square. I don't see how Queens and Brooklyn is considered to be out of the way or different from Manhattan.
 
I'm being brutally honest here but with the OP's stats, NYLS might be the only option, even for PT admission. Fordham, Cardozo and Brooklyn are much better than their rankings might indicate. Any notion that these schools are easy to get into is simply not accurate.