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Author Topic: Ideas for Nontraditional Law Careers [Index in 1st Post]  (Read 4198 times)


t...

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Re: Ideas for Nontraditional Law Careers
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2007, 10:12:40 AM »
I'll try another approach.

Maybe those of us not interested in billing over 1800 hours (and preferably less or not at all), not interested in the firm lifestyle, could trade advice and research on how to find a satisfactory niche in the legal world. Are any of y'all trying to find a creative way to buck the system?

What do some of you plan on doing once you get through law school, have an expensive bar exam and preparation pending, and around a hundred thousand in student loan debt staring you in the face? Or is everyone else resigned to "do my time in a big firm and pay down my student loans, and then move on"?

Forgive me for being a little cynical about that approach...
Quote
Cady on October 16, 2007, 10:41:52 PM

i rhink tyi'm inejying my fudgcicle too much

Quote
Huey on February 07, 2007, 11:15:32 PM

I went to a party in an apartment in a silo once.

annab

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Re: Ideas for Nontraditional Law Careers
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2007, 11:14:00 AM »
Tag.

urp

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Re: Ideas for Nontraditional Law Careers
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2007, 01:08:57 PM »
*watches*

urp

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Re: Ideas for Nontraditional Law Careers
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2007, 01:57:37 PM »
4.  Assisting indigenous peoples secure their intellectual property rights

Hmmm... 

urp

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Re: Ideas for Nontraditional Law Careers
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2007, 02:18:56 PM »
5.  Access to clean water.

http://www.tierramerica.net/2004/0501/iarticulo.shtml

 Clean Water Access Far Short of Millennium Goal

By Haider Rizvi*

Two years after the World Summit on Sustainable Development, progress in access to water and sanitation is alarmingly slow, say experts. It would take double the current expenditures of 16 billion dollars a year to halve the population lacking access to clean water by 2015.

NEW YORK - Governments around the world have failed to keep their promises for providing clean water and appropriate sanitation for poor populations, pledges made two years ago at the World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD), in Johannesburg.

The conclusion reached by many officials and experts attending the two-week session of the Commission on Sustainable Development at the United Nations headquarters in New York is that many governments have failed to match their words with actions.

"The situation is grim," said Berge Brende, Norway's environment minister, during one of the meetings aimed at assessing how the world has tackled the issues related to water, sanitation, and human settlement since the WSSD, also known as "Rio+10", in 2002.

Brende, who chairs the U.N. Commission on Sustainable Development, estimates that every year three to five million people die from water-related diseases in poor regions of the world.

According to the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), more than a billion people continue to live and work in abject poverty with no access to clean and safe drinking water.

The Johannesburg Summit had pledged additional resources, transfer of technology and rebuilding of environmental infrastructure for the world's poor nations -- three vital steps for achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) that aim at halving the number of people without access to sanitation and safe water by the year 2015.

U.N. officials say progress towards achieving the MDGs has been alarmingly slow, mainly due to lack of financial resources. "The world needs to more than double its spending if it is to achieve the Millennium targets," says José Antonio Ocampo, U.N. undersecretary-general for economic and social affairs.

Currently, the world is spending about 16 billion dollars on related projects, an amount that experts on sustainable development say is not sufficient to reverse the situation of lack of access to fresh water and to sanitation services.

Noting that most poor nations are short on technological and financial resources to achieve the MDGs on their own, experts attending the Commission sessions insisted that the world's wealthy nations must contribute more towards addressing the water and sanitation issues.

"It's so expensive to provide these services," says Martha Karua, Kenya's minister of water management resources. "We need to encourage development partners to do something."

But recent trends show that most Western nations are not willing to do much. In fact, some of them have already cut their development aid budgets, saying that poor nations are responsible for poverty and environmental degradation because they have failed to root out corruption.

Some in the industrialized world suggest that privatization could lead to effective water management and distribution, a view that many civil society groups and government leaders from the developing world have refused to embrace.

According to a recent 20-nation survey conducted by GlobeScan Research, a Canada-based group, most people have begun to doubt that privatization would lead to better water and sanitation conditions.

GlobeScan says most people in 11 out of 20 countries surveyed wanted less water privatization, adding that Latin Americans were particularly "negative" towards giving up state control of the sector.

"The results are sobering, but not surprising," says Doug Miller, president of GlobeScan. "Mismanaged privatization processes in a number of countries, plus the breach of public trust resulting from recent corporate scandals means the privatization bubble may be running out of support at the very time when the private sector is gearing up for major expansion."

The European Union adopted a proposal to allocate over one billion dollars to improve access to water and sanitation for the Africa, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) bloc of 77 countries, former European colonies. Forty of them, which the U.N. has categorized as "least developed nations", are heavily dependent on EU aid.

Skeptical about the proposal, a consortium of civil society groups led by the Africa-Europe Faith and Justice Network, is pressing the EU to ensure that its new initiative would not further water privatization in developing countries.

Environmental activists said they welcomed the water initiative, but stressed that the EU must "prioritize capacity building above infrastructure or promoting private investment."

Those opposed to privatization argue that water should not be treated as an economic good and that solutions to the water problems should be sought from the perspective of human rights, and not from the standpoint economic gains

"Access to clean water is a right according to our constitution," Daniel Pascual, Guatemalan agrarian leader told delegates of the U.N. meeting via remote telecast from his country.

"Water is part of mother nature. We are part of it," he said.

GlobeScan's survey shows that Pascual is not alone in his thoughts on the issue of water.

When asked if the access to clean drinking water should be a basic human right, 84 percent of the poll respondents said "Yes," according to Miller.

Those at the forefront of the international efforts for sustainable development recognize there are conflicting views on the distribution and management of water.

"The world needs to move away from ideological position," says Ian Johnson, World Bank vice president for sustainable development. "It's going to be combination of all (private and public). It's a shared responsibility at the end of the day."

* Haider Rizvi is a Tierramérica contributor.

urp

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Re: Ideas for Nontraditional Law Careers
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2007, 02:27:08 PM »
6. Fight the system (for green energy)

http://renewableenergylaw.blogspot.com/

Friday, December 15, 2006
Cape Wind's Prospects Improve, But Project Still Faces Lengthy Delay in Federal Regulatory Review Process

Renewable Energy Access offers an interesting update on the status of the Cape Wind Project today. As the article notes, the election of democrat Deval Patrick as Governor of Massachusetts this past November has improved chances that the project will eventually be constructed. Unlike his republican predecessor, Mitt Romney, Governor-Elect Patrick supports the project. Cape Wind developers hope that the change in leadership will avoid any additional delays in state regulatory review.

But the change in the governor's office is unlikely to have a significant effect on the federal regulatory process, which has already hit a number of snags. The U.S Army Corps of Engineers originally published the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the project several years ago, in late 2004. After reviewing the DEIS, the Environmental Protection Agency filed comments critical of the project, stating that the DEIS was inadequate, and that further study was required. Then, in 2005, The Energy Policy Act of 2005 switched federal jurisdiction over offshore wind farm projects from the Army Corps of Engineers to the U.S. Interior Department's Minerals Management Service (MMS). MMS has jurisdiction over offshore oil and gas leases, and some in Congress believed that MMS's offshore experience made it the more appropriate agency for review of offshore wind farms.

The change in jurisdiction has resulted in significant delays in the review process. MMS released its Notice of Intent to prepare an EIS for the Cape Wind project (PDF) on May 30, 2006, essentially starting the federal regulatory review process over from scratch. According to the Renewable Energy Access article, MMS has wrapped up the scoping process for the project, and expects to complete its review of the project sometime in 2008. If approved, construction likely won't start until 2009 or 2010.

Check out the Renewable Energy Access article for more details. Materials related to the new Cape Wind EIS process are available on the MMS website.

posted by Geoff Hand, Associate Attorney at 10:49 AM | 5 comments

urp

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Re: Ideas for Nontraditional Law Careers
« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2007, 02:39:24 PM »
8. Protect the homeless.

http://www.aclu-sc.org/News/OpenForum/101947/101958/

Victory For Homeless Rights

The ACLU of Southern California secured a historic victory for homeless rights in April, when the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that arresting homeless people using public spaces when no shelter space is available was cruel and unusual punishment.

The decision in Jones v. City of Los Angeles marks the first time in a decade that a court has struck down an ordinance criminalizing the lack of shelter space in the city.

“Anyone who cares about homelessness and finding positive solutions to this serious issue in our community will be delighted and encouraged by this decision,” said Ramona Ripston, executive director of the ACLU/SC. “The ACLU has always maintained that police should target serious crime like rape and drug trafficking, and not criminalize people for sleeping on the street when there is nowhere else to go.”

There are at least 88,000 men, woman and children homeless in Los Angeles County, with 8,000 to 10,000 of them located in downtown. The county provides enough beds to serve less than half of the region’s homeless. In lieu of adequate comprehensive services, the county’s jails are routinely used to substitute for mental health facilities.

The 2-1 ruling by the circuit court nulled a city code that’s been used for more than 35 years by police to round up the homeless. The code forbids people from sitting, sleeping or lying on any street, sidewalk or public space. Violators could face a $1,000 fine or up to six months in jail. The appellate court ordered the District Court to create a narrow injunction designed to stop the city from enforcing the code at will.

“The Eighth Amendment prohibits the City from punishing involuntary sitting, lying, or sleeping on public sidewalks that is an unavoidable consequence of being human and homeless without shelter in the City of Los Angeles,” wrote Judge Kim M. Wardlaw for the majority opinion.

The ACLU/SC, acting in conjunction with the National Lawyers Guild, originally filed the suit in February, 2003 on behalf of six homeless persons. It was argued in December, 2005.

Mark Rosenbaum, ACLU/SC legal director, called the decision “brave.”

“This decision is the most significant judicial opinion involving homelessness in the history of the nation,” Rosenbaum said. “The decision means it is no longer a crime to be homeless in Los Angeles. For homeless in our community, 1/5 of whom are veterans and nearly a quarter are children, they can no longer be treated as criminals because of involuntary acts like sleeping and sitting where there are not available shelter beds to take them off the mean streets of the city. My hope is that the city will now treat homelessness as a social problem affecting all of us, not as a crime.”

According to the Los Angeles Times, the City Attorney’s office stated its plans to appeal the decision to the full appellate court.

obamacon

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Re: Ideas for Nontraditional Law Careers
« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2007, 03:00:31 PM »
7.  Help get rid of the American Ghetto


Realize that, as a lawyer, you'll have few tools to solve this most overblown of problems.

obamacon

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Re: Ideas for Nontraditional Law Careers
« Reply #9 on: April 05, 2007, 03:05:06 PM »
Tug on my skirt somewhere else.

Who's lacking in seriousness?