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Author Topic: Can I Still Be A Good Lawyer?  (Read 2273 times)

hmm

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Re: Can I Still Be A Good Lawyer?
« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2007, 03:35:11 AM »
If you won the Glenbrooks twice, I wouldn't bet against you doing well in law. (policy or ld?)

Soft Factors

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Re: Can I Still Be A Good Lawyer?
« Reply #11 on: March 29, 2007, 08:26:12 AM »
This is all very encouraging.  I don't think I'll go into law school with the transfer mentality, so it's good to hear that people have climbed out of the TTT ditch.  I will consider transferring, though.  I figure it will be hard for me to land one of the sought after jobs.  The debt payback will be a haul and I understand that.  But, I'm not shooting for BIG LAW.  I want a federal judicial clerkship.  Ultimately, I hope to eventually do fine financially as a criminal defense attorney, and I think Hofstra won't hinder my ability to enter some public defenders office.  I'm just a little worried that there will be no consideration with the federal judges (and BIG LAW if I change my mind) because of my brand name. 

Great advice.  I really really appreciate.

Now, to upset hmm and Huey:

I won the Glenbrooks twice in the same year.  How?  I won in Humerous Interpretation and Duo Interpretation.  I'm sorry.  I did Lincoln Douglas here and there (my favorite event), but the lady friends that interp final rounds pulled were too much of a reason to keep them laughing, so to speak.

 
Hofstra '10

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Re: Can I Still Be A Good Lawyer?
« Reply #12 on: March 29, 2007, 08:36:40 AM »
Umm good luck.  You could be a good lawyer still, if you're smart enough in the first place.  I don't want to rain on your parade, but I think I am obligated to warn you that even though I was generally interested in the school, I didn't even apply after numerous Hofstra students advised me to stay away. 

ptown

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Re: Can I Still Be A Good Lawyer?
« Reply #13 on: March 29, 2007, 10:08:22 AM »

they get assigned the big assignments,

since when do new biglaw associates get big assignments?  From what I understand they are generally behind the scenes doing all the gruntwork for the partners

Quote
and they get promoted more quickly.


source?  Again, from my research it seems that very few biglaw associates make partner, or even stay at the firm for very long.


also, all of this assumes that making money is a necessary trait of a "good" lawyer
Missouri 1L

"I was discriminated against during the college-testing process because I come from a culture that is opposed to filling in circles completely and with firm pressure."

ptown

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Re: Can I Still Be A Good Lawyer?
« Reply #14 on: March 29, 2007, 10:40:20 AM »
New biglaw associates don't get big assignments. As you noted, they're paperwork/research monkeys. However, someday they have to become big boys and girls. My comment was referring to this. In general, T14 grads get pulled up quicker. My source for this is basically what I've heard from friends who graduated law school two and three years ago. There's probably data out there to settle this, but I'm too lazy to look right now. Maybe later. Yes, very few biglaw associates make partner. Look at the partner lists at big firms (and pay attention to the recent partners--back in the day, law schools didn't matter as much as they do now) and you'll see maybe 20 or so schools.

And, all other things being equal, making money is a necessary trait of a good lawyer. Sure, some people do choose low paying forms of law (HR anyone?). Nevertheless, for 90% of lawyers, pay is a pretty good proxy for how good you are. People are willing to pay more for better lawyers. That's why crap lawyers are getting paid $300 to file divorce paperwork and $500 to file bankruptcies. They're making next to no money (remember, they have overhead. out of $300, they might pocket $50) because they suck. 1L's at big law make $135k+/year because they don't suck. It's econ 101.   

I don't know...One would think this works both ways, and believe me I know some really really sh*tty lawyers.  I mean horrible, I've read through court transcripts with some of these guys that actually made me laugh out loud at the stupid crap that comes out of their mouth.  Ive seen the Court essentialy tell people to shutup because they are a retard.

That certainly doesn't stop them from being loaded though, and I mean LOADED.  This is a very small city though, so I'm sure the market is much different here as there isn't much competition.
Missouri 1L

"I was discriminated against during the college-testing process because I come from a culture that is opposed to filling in circles completely and with firm pressure."

ishi

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Re: Can I Still Be A Good Lawyer?
« Reply #15 on: March 29, 2007, 11:02:30 AM »
...Will you be stuck with the life of a public defender making $30k and driving a Corola? Maybe...
I've met two public defenders in the SF Bay Area, and both were Boalt grads.  I always thought PD jobs were actually kinda tough to get.  Maybe this varies from county to county.  Anyone have any first-hand info?

(sorry Soft Factors, I'm not trying to hijack - I think you'll do fine, especially with your hotshot debating skills...)

ivy08

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Re: Can I Still Be A Good Lawyer?
« Reply #16 on: March 29, 2007, 04:16:08 PM »
to be perfectly frank, you are probably screwed. there is certainly no reason to feel proud about your "accomplishment."

ivy08

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Re: Can I Still Be A Good Lawyer?
« Reply #17 on: March 29, 2007, 04:30:22 PM »
to be perfectly frank, you are probably screwed. there is certainly no reason to feel proud about your "accomplishment."

ivy, my dawg!, you're back.  new and improved! sick! epic!

I have no idea what you are talking about, though my source tells me ivy07 was ipbanned---thus wiping out all wireless connections to lsd in the main college library

Soft Factors

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Re: Can I Still Be A Good Lawyer?
« Reply #18 on: March 29, 2007, 05:15:56 PM »
By good lawyer I mean effective, successful and well respected.  This attorney usually does command a high fee, but good and rich are certainly not mutually exclusive.  I have seen a lawyer get $400,000 for one criminal trial and still get swapped out half way through because they were ineffective (stumbling through the opening argument while holding a few pages of notes ripped off a legal pad).

There are some excellent opportunities for law school graduates and they are usually reserved for the top students, and more specifically top students from top schools.  I'm just hoping I can still have access to these opportunities if I do very well at a TTT and if I go after the positions.  I already have very sexy work experience, which has to help a little.

I guess I know a Supreme Court Judicial Clerkship is out of the question even with a #1 class ranking from Hofstra, but I hope there are ways to gain access to other excellent opportunities.  I'm not thinking BIG LAW, so the small draw for on-campus interviews won't affect me that much, but when I go after opportunities, I hope they don't reject me simply because of the label on my degree.

   
Hofstra '10

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Re: Can I Still Be A Good Lawyer?
« Reply #19 on: March 29, 2007, 06:37:58 PM »
I checked back and saw you want a Federal clerkship.  You will have to be at the very top of your class,  probably top 5% with an editor position on Law Review or something like that, to even have a chance at an interview. Maybe you could clerk at the state level and then apply for fed clerkships if you can get a great recommendation from your Judge.  The fact is you will not have the same options as someone coming out of Brooklyn, let alone Fordham, let alone a law school that will actually give you a decent enough shot at a Fed clerkship for it to even be on your radar at this point.  Some judges and other prestigious non-biglaw jobs that follow similar legal career paths, DOJ, SEC etc. will generally consider a TTT grad more often than would a biglaw firm.  But many Judges, especially at the competitive federal districts already have a list of 5 or 10 schools they will even look at resumes from.

I know a lot of Hofstra grads and you'll be lucky if you can get a clerkship at the Nassau County Family Court, so maybe you should really think about what you would be satisfied by upon graduation.