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Author Topic: john edwards should call ann coulter bad name  (Read 6025 times)

gratif

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Re: john edwards should call ann coulter bad name
« Reply #20 on: April 02, 2007, 03:05:28 PM »
yes, we have quite advantage.

Is the advantage the mastery of the english language?

/endcondescendingprick

overthehill

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Re: john edwards should call ann coulter bad name
« Reply #21 on: April 02, 2007, 05:15:29 PM »
get it straight.  women new blacks.  blacks new gays.

do julie have explain everything?

 :D  I guess so.

overthehill

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Re: john edwards should call ann coulter bad name
« Reply #22 on: April 02, 2007, 05:16:48 PM »
Nah.  She's a stupid female private part.  Just like gay is the new black, "faggot" is the new "n-word."  It's appropriate in certain contexts, only not when weilded with malice.

So, gays and blacks are a protected class but women are not?  Perhaps one day women will be the new black (in your mind).

Women are a majority.

So?

overthehill

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Re: john edwards should call ann coulter bad name
« Reply #23 on: April 02, 2007, 05:35:19 PM »
yes, we have quite advantage.

Is the advantage the mastery of the english language?

/endcondescendingprick

Why don’t you educate her with some of your skills?


At 21 I was a child; at 23 I am an adult. The most difficult step of the transformation was not the change itself, but the cultivation of the desire towards that end. It has been the most life-altering development that I have ever undergone.

My 21-year-old self had an eccentric way of thinking, which stemmed from the premise that happiness is a choice. I still embrace this principle, and dearly so, but the conclusions I draw from it as an adult stand in stark contrast to those previously held. My younger self reasoned that because it made no sense to choose to be unhappy, he would simply be in high spirits at all times and live a life of exuberance. Ambitions, unfulfilled desires, and even shortcomings were rationalized as irrelevant and thus not pursued. Above all else, he was content.

In the summer of 2005 I was presented with an extraordinary opportunity. My friend Jon, who had been a professional card player for less than two years, would be competing in the World Series of Poker. He used some of his prior winnings to purchase an RV (that we later affectionately dubbed “Heidi”), and invited three friends along to travel the country for two straight months.

This trip would mark the beginning of the end of that person I now call "the young me." Over the course of this trip, we traveled twenty-five states and experienced the full spectrum of Americana. While our main destinations were major poker tournaments, in gambling hotbeds like Tunica, Mississippi and Atlantic City, New Jersey, we also stayed for extended periods in cultural meccas, such as Los Angeles and New York City. The breadth of our journey went far beyond mere geography; it encompassed the human experience as well. A millionaire in Las Vegas, whom we had never met, treated us to meals that cost over $200 a plate, while that very same month we slept on a street corner with homeless people in Memphis, on account of believing our vehicle to be stolen.

Two weeks before the end of our trip, I realized drastic change was just over the horizon. I would very likely never have another summer like this one. Its conclusion would mark the beginning of a transition to the responsibilities of adulthood. For the first time in my life, I became aware of the “real life” (as college students so frequently call it) that lay just around the corner. While our tour yielded a lifetime of fun and memories, by the final day none of us had ever longed so much to see the “Welcome to Wisconsin” sign that would mark our return to the stable familiarity of home.

Having lived in an RV for two months, I found it easy to discard former inconsequential boyhood pastimes such as fantasy football and video games. This newfound time was spent on introspection and self-improvement. For the first time ever, I made it a point to be reading one piece of fiction and one piece of non-fiction at all times. I grew an affinity for bicycling; the zenith of which was a 300 mile camping trip in which I biked across the state of Wisconsin in July 2006. I committed to political science as my undergraduate major. I lost over 30 pounds and became physically fit. My GPA jumped from being a 2.5 during my first two years of college to over a 3.0 over the remainder. I became involved in extra-curriculars, such as the Society of Politics and the Pre-Law Club. I developed deeper and more meaningful friendships. All of these changes were improvements that "the young me" would have barely considered undertaking. In short, I grew up.

I still share the optimism of "the young me," although not so blindly anymore. I learned that even though most aspirations are non-essential to happiness, it does not follow that they are superfluous. Happiness is scalar and exists in varying degrees. Ambition begets the achievement of goals and provides its possessor with a sense of purpose. Discontent is thus healthy.

Accordingly, my present ambitions are an extension of this optimistic discontent. The desires and interests that drove my undergraduate study are expanded upon and continued in the field of law. The will towards accomplishment, which saw its own beginnings just a few short summers ago, has blossomed into the core of a self-motivated individual, who seeks not only to reform himself but to effect change on grander scale. These intentions have led me to the law program at the University of St. Thomas.

As a firm believer in lifelong learning, I am attracted to a legal education because it offers a unique training ground for a certain way of thinking and analysis. It will serve me as a tool for gaining an awareness of the inner workings of our government and justice system, which responsible citizens ought to hold in high esteem. I revere the possibility using this knowledge in an eventual return to academia. However, I do not merely seek to be a knower-of-things, chock-full of lofty ideas about society and government. In regards to these, I intend to be a full and active participant.

In February 2008 I will apply to be a Judge Advocate General in the Air Force. If awarded this commission, I will fulfill my ROTC obligations with St. Thomas’s resident detachment (the only such unit in St. Paul). This experience with hopefully segue into a rewarding career in public service. I am enthusiastic about the school because of its proven commitment to attracting and a talented student body, and its utterly superb facilities. A legal education from St. Thomas will be even more valuable upon my exit from the military, as demonstrated by the school’s vigor in the pursuit and assistance of qualified applicants. I sincerely hope that I can count myself among their ranks this fall.


PS: I knocked someone up. Let me into your f-ing school with a full scholarship. I don't care who I have to sleep with to get in.


Do you realize you are joining an organization that has an official policy of discrimination against homosexuals?

Julie Fern

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Re: john edwards should call ann coulter bad name
« Reply #24 on: April 03, 2007, 04:22:30 PM »
julie julie. not that clear already?

julie yam what julie yam?

julie popeye sailor man?

Julie Fern

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Re: john edwards should call ann coulter bad name
« Reply #25 on: April 03, 2007, 04:23:12 PM »
yes, we have quite advantage.

Is the advantage the mastery of the english language?

/endcondescendingprick

not mock handicapped.

Julie Fern

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Re: john edwards should call ann coulter bad name
« Reply #26 on: April 03, 2007, 04:23:51 PM »
get it straight. women new blacks. blacks new gays.

do julie have explain everything?

 :D I guess so.

gee, that too bad.

The Poster

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Re: john edwards should call ann coulter bad name
« Reply #27 on: April 03, 2007, 09:36:16 PM »
quote Stanley J. Watson III
you are doomed in the fated sense, but that's completely irrelevant because that's only from the viewpoint of someone who is not constrained by time. since you are temporal, for all intents and purposes you have the power to change your future

Julie Fern

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Re: john edwards should call ann coulter bad name
« Reply #28 on: April 04, 2007, 08:11:22 AM »
toot toot!

The Poster

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Re: john edwards should call ann coulter bad name
« Reply #29 on: April 08, 2007, 09:12:30 AM »
quote Stanley J. Watson III
you are doomed in the fated sense, but that's completely irrelevant because that's only from the viewpoint of someone who is not constrained by time. since you are temporal, for all intents and purposes you have the power to change your future