Law School Discussion

BC vs. BU

iscoredawaitlist

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Re: BC vs. BU
« Reply #100 on: April 05, 2007, 04:22:37 PM »
ah! i read the book about that, Taking Down the House

Re: BC vs. BU
« Reply #101 on: April 05, 2007, 04:53:04 PM »
because nearly all of the current students on here are BC students. next year the tables will be turned when we're trolling on the BC v BU threads!

actually, all the BC students I've spoken with (and the ones i've read on here) have nothing but good things to say about BU (although they obviously prefer BC).  i agree with SuzieQ...it's mostly 0Ls and non-students who talk smack about BU on LSD.

but yea, you're cranky...so no big deal. 

btw, election[/i} rules...and that quote is probably the best part of the movie.  classic. 

Stuje1

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Re: BC vs. BU
« Reply #102 on: April 05, 2007, 05:27:25 PM »
I have a question that I'd be curious to hear about from current BC students. In deciding between BU and BC, one major difference is that BC is a Catholic school; how does this impact the curriculum? Are nuns and priests on the law school faculty? How do they address Roe v. Wade? How does the Catholic side come out in the classroom?
I'm not interested in going to a law school where I'm going to be subject to commentary on the Catholic perspective on abortion and sexuality (be it anything from gay marriage to masturbation to birth control).

I am Jewish (and not a religious Jew) and have not had any problems, concerns, etc. about BC being Catholic.  The law school is extremely open and welcoming of all points of views. For example, I am a member (or attend meetings) of the school' Reproductive Choice group, the Jewish Law students Association, American Constitution Society, ACLU, etc.  There are plenty of opportunities to explore groups, speakers, events which represnt any sort of view/political leaning you desire.  The fact that BC is jesuit does not hamper this in anyway.  As "More" said, the Jesuit tradition is about learning and sharing of ideas, and is a real strength of BC, not a downfall (even if you disagree with Catholicism/religion). 

I have really enjoyed the mix of view points at the school.   I am actually planning on taking Con law with one of the few Jesuit priests on the faculty.   I am very big into the separation of church and state, and so I am really curious to hear his views on it.   But even if he disagrees, I think it will be interesting to learn from a different perspective and to have interesting debates in class.  Sometimes it is nice to re-affirm or challenge your own thoughts by hearing an intellectual argument from the opposing view.   In any event, I have heard that the priest is actually very respectful of both sides and presents the class in a very neutral way.

The fact that BC is jesuit will not negatively affect someone who holds opposing views in any way.   The Undergrad might be a different story, but the law school is very distinct and they do not dare try to impose any of that stuff on us (for example, the UG imposed a speaker policy that essentially gave the administration veto power over topics that are too controversial.   They did not even think about doing that to the law school, as they know we would be raising a ruckus and filing suit in an instant).  The law school profs are very open minded and come from all politically leanings.   Some of the prof were integral in FAIR v Rumsfeld (to try and repeal Solomon amendment...i.e. repeal don't ask don't tell) and every year we get a letter signed by nearly every professor which says they are against discrimination towards homosexuals in the military.   It is a very diverse school and you will certainly not feel out of place being a student who does not espouse Catholic views.   The Jesuit ideals of knowledge, understanding and diversity of thought are really great though, and is definitely a strength of BC law.


Afro

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Re: BC vs. BU
« Reply #103 on: April 09, 2007, 04:03:15 PM »
BC law lectures rarely involve religion. I think the same is true at Georgetown, Fordham or Notre Dame....the other catholic law schools.

Re: BC vs. BU
« Reply #104 on: April 12, 2007, 11:16:56 AM »
bump - and a question.

Anyone else worried about the downward trend of BC vs. the upward trend of BU? BU is clearly gunning for a high ranking. i don't think BU will be T14 anytime soon but if it breaks 20 and BC slides out into the 30s, that maybe something to consider. can any current students weigh in on whats being done at both schools to address this?

(i know rankings aren't the whole story and i'm not basing my decision solely on them. the trend is more of a concern than the actual numbers).

Re: BC vs. BU
« Reply #105 on: April 12, 2007, 11:53:24 AM »
Wasn't BU tied for 18 or 19 last year? These small differences don't really matter. No hiring partner who knows both schools will think differently if either one moves up or down a couple.

Stuje1

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Re: BC vs. BU
« Reply #106 on: April 12, 2007, 02:10:56 PM »
bump - and a question.

Anyone else worried about the downward trend of BC vs. the upward trend of BU? BU is clearly gunning for a high ranking. i don't think BU will be T14 anytime soon but if it breaks 20 and BC slides out into the 30s, that maybe something to consider. can any current students weigh in on whats being done at both schools to address this?

(i know rankings aren't the whole story and i'm not basing my decision solely on them. the trend is more of a concern than the actual numbers).

There isn't a "trend", both schools have been hovering in the same spots for the past few years.  BC had been higher, and then all of a sudden in 2004, BU and BC swapped in the rankings (I don't think one can say BU all of a sudden magically transformed into a better school, just some changes in the numbers occurred/were manipulated that year).  BU ranked 23, 20, 22, 20 over the next 4 years.  BC was 29, 27, 27, 28.   Point being, there is no "trend," both are hovering up or down a few spots in their areas.  Just so happened that BC went down this year (a whopping one spot) and BU went up (a whole two spots).  BC is not going to slide out of the top 20s and BU will not climb above the top 20.  Both will hover in their respective areas within the 20s, possibly changing spots but neither jumping in or out of a whole new 10 spot placing.  BC has too good numbers to ever drop out of the top 20s (USnews would certainly be quite a joke if a school that places so well in the top/biggest firms and has such a great reputation, a major reason students choose a professional school, was not in the top 20s).  As for what the school is doing, I am not sure what is going on behind the scenes.  I am sure something will get done, because the students and alumns are not happy.  Not so much at us being in the low 20s, but no one likes seeing BU in front of us, and that is something people want to make sure changes.  Expect the students and alumns to organize (I have heard plans) to make sure things get done.

On a cool, unrelated side note.  As I had said in another post, one of the judges on the US Court of Appeals (6th circuit) judged the moot court competition at BC.  Well today he came into our constitutional law class and co-taught with our professor (the dean).  Nothing like a tag-team socratic method session from the dean of the law school and a judge on the US Court of Appeals to keep you on your toes!

nukelaw

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Re: BC vs. BU
« Reply #107 on: April 13, 2007, 06:10:10 AM »
FWIW, I talked to some of the administration/faculty on the day the rankings came out. One thing they pointed out to me is that BC gets hurt in the rankings because of the large number of folks we have dedicated to careers in public interest (government and non-profit). These positions run on tight budgets so that they can't formally offer employment until one passes the bar (typically taken in late July after you graduate with results delivered in November). As a result, unlike those who get firm offers in early fall after their 2L summer associateships, the public interest crowd is counted as "unemployed at graduation" for USNWR ranking purposes. Thus, even if one has an informal handshake agreement of a job in the public sector, USNWR won't count it until the "employed nine months after graduation" total.

As a former government civil servant, I'm proud that BC still encourages this line of work through scholarships, LRAP, and PILF without regard to the rankings.

Regarding Onthefence's initial question, BC's administration is having a "Year in Review" townhall meeting with the BC Law community on 4/23 where I'm sure the rankings will be addressed.

iscoredawaitlist

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Re: BC vs. BU
« Reply #108 on: April 13, 2007, 10:37:16 AM »
FWIW, I talked to some of the administration/faculty on the day the rankings came out. One thing they pointed out to me is that BC gets hurt in the rankings because of the large number of folks we have dedicated to careers in public interest (government and non-profit). These positions run on tight budgets so that they can't formally offer employment until one passes the bar (typically taken in late July after you graduate with results delivered in November). As a result, unlike those who get firm offers in early fall after their 2L summer associateships, the public interest crowd is counted as "unemployed at graduation" for USNWR ranking purposes. Thus, even if one has an informal handshake agreement of a job in the public sector, USNWR won't count it until the "employed nine months after graduation" total.

As a former government civil servant, I'm proud that BC still encourages this line of work through scholarships, LRAP, and PILF without regard to the rankings.

yeah? It looks like 3.6% went into PI and 9.2% into governement for BC while Boston University sent 4% and 11% respectively.

I'm not sure nuke's theory explains it. Perhaps there's some other factor that I'm not thinking of, but since it looks like BU actually sends MORE into these fields (albeit only a few more), it would make more sense that BU would be the one hurt by it -- not BC.

Stuje1

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Re: BC vs. BU
« Reply #109 on: April 13, 2007, 11:09:58 AM »
FWIW, I talked to some of the administration/faculty on the day the rankings came out. One thing they pointed out to me is that BC gets hurt in the rankings because of the large number of folks we have dedicated to careers in public interest (government and non-profit). These positions run on tight budgets so that they can't formally offer employment until one passes the bar (typically taken in late July after you graduate with results delivered in November). As a result, unlike those who get firm offers in early fall after their 2L summer associateships, the public interest crowd is counted as "unemployed at graduation" for USNWR ranking purposes. Thus, even if one has an informal handshake agreement of a job in the public sector, USNWR won't count it until the "employed nine months after graduation" total.

As a former government civil servant, I'm proud that BC still encourages this line of work through scholarships, LRAP, and PILF without regard to the rankings.

yeah? It looks like 3.6% went into PI and 9.2% into governement for BC while Boston University sent 4% and 11% respectively.

I'm not sure nuke's theory explains it. Perhaps there's some other factor that I'm not thinking of, but since it looks like BU actually sends MORE into these fields (albeit only a few more), it would make more sense that BU would be the one hurt by it -- not BC.

You know the theory makes sense, i am just wondering if for some reason there is a difference in the reporting practices between the two school.   It certainly makes sense that students going into PI/Gov. (as well as small firms) would not have official offers until they pass the bar.   What doesn't make sense is why BU would be able to report these informal offers as "employment" and BC wouldn't.  I am wondering if there is some misunderstanding BCs end on what exactly we can report or maybe if BU found some way to count these informal offers as employment.   I am going to speak to the Career services at my school and get some more details on the process.  I'll let you know what I find out (might be after finals).