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Author Topic: is this going to be a problem?  (Read 1176 times)

bhangbhangbang

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is this going to be a problem?
« on: March 15, 2007, 03:33:13 PM »
so i'm totally new to this applying to law school thing ... and i need some advice . . .

i'm 2 years out of college, got my bs in microbiology, didn't form many "relationships" with any profs . . . so i'm not sure if i'll be able to get a good lor from any of them.  i have other good sources for letters (community leaders, church leaders, employers, etc.), but i keep on reading that having a letter of rec from someone who can assess your academic potential from a classroom setting is pretty important.

is this going to be a problem for me?

thank you much.

jdhu

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Re: is this going to be a problem?
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2007, 05:13:59 PM »
I was somewhat in the same boat, worked for a few years after college before applying this year.  I think an employer LOR that discusses your capabilities/potential would substitute well for a professor LOR.

I happened to meet a former adcomm person through work and thus got a very nice LOR from him.  See if you can find someone similar, or perhaps you are a member of Mensa or something like that, something like that that provides some clue to your academic potential.

Hank Rearden

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Re: is this going to be a problem?
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2007, 05:17:09 PM »
I don't know what Mensa would mean...

I do recommend getting at least one academic letter, even if it isn't very good.
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jdhu

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Re: is this going to be a problem?
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2007, 09:29:55 PM »
I don't know what Mensa would mean...

I do recommend getting at least one academic letter, even if it isn't very good.

Was just off the top of my head, seems like membership in something like Mensa shows some sort of academic potential...

I disagree about getting a "not very good" LOR from an academic source, seems like a school would wonder "why the heck did this person submit a weak LOR?"

Hank Rearden

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Re: is this going to be a problem?
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2007, 09:34:10 PM »
I don't know what Mensa would mean...

I do recommend getting at least one academic letter, even if it isn't very good.

Was just off the top of my head, seems like membership in something like Mensa shows some sort of academic potential...

I disagree about getting a "not very good" LOR from an academic source, seems like a school would wonder "why the heck did this person submit a weak LOR?"

Hmm, maybe, but remember that 80-90% of rec letters say nothing useful.  At least if you had a professor say something not useful, they would know you weren't a bad student?
CLS '10

The appropriateness of Perpetua would probably depend on the tone of the writing.  When I used it, I (half playfully) thought the extra space made the words sort of resonate.

oudidntno

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Re: is this going to be a problem?
« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2007, 09:47:27 PM »
so i'm totally new to this applying to law school thing ... and i need some advice . . .

i'm 2 years out of college, got my bs in microbiology, didn't form many "relationships" with any profs . . . so i'm not sure if i'll be able to get a good lor from any of them.  i have other good sources for letters (community leaders, church leaders, employers, etc.), but i keep on reading that having a letter of rec from someone who can assess your academic potential from a classroom setting is pretty important.

is this going to be a problem for me?

thank you much.

Would you happen to be close to anyone who is familiar with law school and knows the type of maturity and dedication necessary to succede in law school- judge, lawyer?.  A great LOR from them explaining how you demonstrate the qualities for law school success would be better than a mediocre LOR from a professor who barely remembers you.  LOR's are meant to give the adcomms an idea about how the people who know you think you will do in Law School.  Professors top that list since they know you and can judge you through experienced eyes in an academic setting (similar to Law School).  However, if professors don't know you then go to the next best choice.  Don't forget that most law schools require two LORs so to be safe you can have a professor recommendation and a great non-academic one.  That's what I did.  However, I agree with the last poster.  I suspect some professor remembers you well.

bamf

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Re: is this going to be a problem?
« Reply #6 on: March 20, 2007, 02:18:02 AM »
if you are recently out of school hopefully you still have some documents from upper level classes you took (and did well in) ... send a letter to the prof explaining who you are, and include some documentation of how well you did in their class.  And finally, if they say yes, just work with them on the conten of the letter.
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waningdelusion

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Re: is this going to be a problem?
« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2007, 02:28:58 AM »
yeah, professors know how important recs are.  if they don't thinkit's a good idea, they will tell you so.  but if you sit down with them, go over some old papers, and are clear about your future plans and ambitions, they'll usually throw you a bone.  in my experience, a professor will never send out a bad rec, at the leastthey'll just refuse to write one.

TeresaPinfold

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Re: is this going to be a problem?
« Reply #8 on: April 04, 2007, 10:08:01 PM »
So it would be within reasonable etiquette to ask a recommendation from a professor whom you've never talked to and who wouldn't know your name? Given that I am in that situation for ALL of my professors, that would be a relief.

Kitty782

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Re: is this going to be a problem?
« Reply #9 on: April 04, 2007, 10:13:43 PM »
I didn't have an academic LOR, and I did alright (three years out of school).  Maybe I wouldn't have been waitlisted where I am, had I had an academic LOR, but I think that my acceptances/rejections/waitlists are on par with my numbers.
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