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Author Topic: people with titles  (Read 9535 times)

lexylit

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people with titles
« on: September 13, 2004, 01:17:49 AM »
the michigan app asks for the name of your recommenders and then it says "title?"

i've got two profs and a lawyer. are their titles professor? dr.? esquire? ms. and mr.?

i'm confused  :-\

Ginatio

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Re: people with titles
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2004, 02:26:59 AM »
i totally just read the title of this post as "people with titties"...

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Re: people with titles
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2004, 02:29:38 AM »
...And I was thinking in terms of people walking around with a word above their head or on their forehead, like a title on a page.

Dr. for the prof's, perhaps?  Not sure about the Esq.  I would probably go with Mr./Ms.
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lexylit

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Re: people with titles
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2004, 03:31:56 AM »
i guess they could all be dr. but i actually put professor and esq.

is that weird?

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Re: people with titles
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2004, 03:57:25 AM »
i guess they could all be dr. but i actually put professor and esq.

is that weird?

No, I'm sure that's fine.  I wasn't sure whether Esquire counts as a title since it comes after the name.  Or can you also use it before?

I had a discussion in Vegas about whether JD's can be called doctors.  JD used to be called LLB back in the day, and from what this guy was telling me, it's still considered a bachelors degree, even though you get it after your bachelors and it's called a Juris Doctorate.  After a JD is an LLM, which is a Masters in Law, and then an SJD, which is the true doctorate. 

Don't know whether this guy was full of crap.  He usually will tell you in the end if he's just kidding.  Like the time when he called my apartment and said that he was calling from LSAC and that they were investigating my LSAT for cheating because my score was so high and 20 of my answers in a row matched up with the people around me.  Kept me going for like 15 minutes, then told me I needed to call his supervisor and gave me the supervisor's name, first name first, then spelled out the last name instead of saying it.  Then I just stared at the name I had written on my paper and figured it out :)
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peaseblossom

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Re: people with titles
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2004, 05:43:10 AM »
Wow that was a mean prank! I hope you paid him back.  ;)

It would make sense...a JD being a bachelor's...because, like you said, LLM is Masters in Law. I hate to think of a JD as a bachelor's! I want to feel like I am moving on up not staying stationary! Being that Law School is a higher institution compared to UCSB's College of Letters and Sci, I suppose it's not so bad. A JD is the "bachelors" of law school, right?

dr_draino

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Re: people with titles
« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2004, 07:25:55 AM »
Prof. title should be their official rank:  either assistant professor, associate professor or professor.  If you don't know this and can't figure it out from their website, then "professor" is much better than doctor, but can be a little misleading.

Not sure about the attorney...if it's in a firm maybe associate/partner?

the michigan app asks for the name of your recommenders and then it says "title?"

i've got two profs and a lawyer. are their titles professor? dr.? esquire? ms. and mr.?

i'm confused  :-\

dr_draino

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Re: people with titles
« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2004, 07:50:35 AM »
Edit:

It's also advisable with profs to put what they're a professor of.  Ex:

Dr. Jack *&^%; Assistant Professor of Philosophy

For the attorneys, the cheesy ones with their ambulance-chaser commercials always title themselves as "attorney at law", is that a generic attorney title?

casino

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Re: people with titles
« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2004, 09:17:36 AM »
yeah, i wouldn't call a professor a doctor.  i would just go with professor, but, like draino indicated, you can get fancy and write "visiting adjunct professor" or some *&^% like that.

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lexylit

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Re: people with titles
« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2004, 11:54:56 AM »
right, my main question was does "title" here mean the prefix o a name, like dr. or mrs. or rabbi, or does "title" mean what a person is/does for a living?

i was going with prof since it covers both bases, but if you all think it's the latter i could change the last one to partner for example  :-\