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Author Topic: Importance of Undergrad School  (Read 5922 times)

wolfpack2

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Re: Importance of Undergrad School
« Reply #10 on: March 11, 2007, 03:19:20 AM »
I've talked to some law firm recruiters and they say they care about UG prestige if it's an Ivy or equivalent (i.e. Stanford, MIT) school. Those of us who didn't do well enough in HS to go to one of these schools will likely suffer a little during our hunt for employment. I'm planning on working just a little harder than my HYP classmates to make up for the lack of prestige. ;)

Or maybe were too poor? I can barely pay for my state UG, I sure as heck wasn't going to be able to get enough student loans/scholarships to pay for an IVY league. Law school is worth 100,000 to me in loans (thank god mine isn't going to be that much), but UG, where I took Geology 100 and English 101...definitely not worth it just for a name on a resume.

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Re: Importance of Undergrad School
« Reply #11 on: March 11, 2007, 11:33:14 AM »
As stated before the biggest impact your undergrad degree has is during the 1L job search. You don't have grades yet, so all prospective employers have is the UG school you went to. Me from a SUNY school won't stack up well against a girl from MIT. But, what are you going to do, get another UG degree?

Well, I considered it, but HYP don't really seem to interested in letting you do that.
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Re: Importance of Undergrad School
« Reply #12 on: March 11, 2007, 12:37:28 PM »
This doesn't answer the firm question but I was looking through clerkship requirememnts and a good number of COA judges or even district judges require your undergraduate transcript.

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Re: Importance of Undergrad School
« Reply #13 on: March 11, 2007, 01:09:09 PM »
I've talked to some law firm recruiters and they say they care about UG prestige if it's an Ivy or equivalent (i.e. Stanford, MIT) school. Those of us who didn't do well enough in HS to go to one of these schools will likely suffer a little during our hunt for employment. I'm planning on working just a little harder than my HYP classmates to make up for the lack of prestige. ;)

Or maybe were too poor? I can barely pay for my state UG, I sure as heck wasn't going to be able to get enough student loans/scholarships to pay for an IVY league. Law school is worth 100,000 to me in loans (thank god mine isn't going to be that much), but UG, where I took Geology 100 and English 101...definitely not worth it just for a name on a resume.

The problem is that Boomers and wealthier Gen X-ers think merit scholarships and need-based financial aid systems really work. It seems to be much more of a problem in Ph.D. programs than legal employment, though it still happens in law.

As for admissions, UG prestige seems to be more of an issue with some schools (Penn, Columbia, Chicago) than with others (NYU, GULC).  It's usually more a question of delay than anything else.
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Re: Importance of Undergrad School
« Reply #14 on: March 11, 2007, 03:59:43 PM »
Yeah. I think for summer after 1-L, especially if you are applying before grades have been posted, undergrad institution and maybe even GPA might matter a bit.

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Re: Importance of Undergrad School
« Reply #15 on: March 11, 2007, 05:02:20 PM »
I think maybe 10 years ago, a lot of this has been true.  More recently, most Ivies - and CERTAINLY HYP - have made sure that finances do not preclude you from attending.  Of course, if your parents can afford to send you here, then you get no money; but that obviously means you are not poor, if they've determined with rather lenient formulas that your parents' income can afford a $40k education.

I go to without a doubt the most generous HYP.  Anecdotally, I have one friend who literally chose to come here over her community college because it was cheaper (nothing here vs. $1000 at her community college).  Personally, my parents are certainly not poor, yet we were still offered grant funds to offset the burden of sending two kids to college. 

In short, I don't think that, if you had gotten into an HYP, finances should play that much of a role.  HYP certainly does not think it should (or at least mine) and makes it very clear to admitted students.  Also, the student newspaper recently wrote how most students who turn down admissions do so for non-financial reasons (acceptance at another high caliber school).  Indeed, the University has made every effort to eliminate finances as a reason for turning down admissions.

Also, for PhD programs, at least top ones like here, they are entirely free.  Although they don't live a lavish lifestyle, PhD students who graduate in less than 5 years should certainly not have any debt.  In fact, if a PhD student gets an outside grant that covers more than what the university gives you, the university pays YOU up to $3000 for your efforts to secure outside funds.

Just some clarity...

I've talked to some law firm recruiters and they say they care about UG prestige if it's an Ivy or equivalent (i.e. Stanford, MIT) school. Those of us who didn't do well enough in HS to go to one of these schools will likely suffer a little during our hunt for employment. I'm planning on working just a little harder than my HYP classmates to make up for the lack of prestige. ;)

Or maybe were too poor? I can barely pay for my state UG, I sure as heck wasn't going to be able to get enough student loans/scholarships to pay for an IVY league. Law school is worth 100,000 to me in loans (thank god mine isn't going to be that much), but UG, where I took Geology 100 and English 101...definitely not worth it just for a name on a resume.

The problem is that Boomers and wealthier Gen X-ers think merit scholarships and need-based financial aid systems really work. It seems to be much more of a problem in Ph.D. programs than legal employment, though it still happens in law.

As for admissions, UG prestige seems to be more of an issue with some schools (Penn, Columbia, Chicago) than with others (NYU, GULC).  It's usually more a question of delay than anything else.

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Re: Importance of Undergrad School
« Reply #16 on: March 11, 2007, 05:04:30 PM »
I agree.  I graduated from an ivy debt free...I love the fact that all are need blind and will give you $$ if you need it.

I think maybe 10 years ago, a lot of this has been true.  More recently, most Ivies - and CERTAINLY HYP - have made sure that finances do not preclude you from attending.  Of course, if your parents can afford to send you here, then you get no money; but that obviously means you are not poor, if they've determined with rather lenient formulas that your parents' income can afford a $40k education.

I go to without a doubt the most generous HYP.  Anecdotally, I have one friend who literally chose to come here over her community college because it was cheaper (nothing here vs. $1000 at her community college).  Personally, my parents are certainly not poor, yet we were still offered grant funds to offset the burden of sending two kids to college. 

In short, I don't think that, if you had gotten into an HYP, finances should play that much of a role.  HYP certainly does not think it should (or at least mine) and makes it very clear to admitted students.  Also, the student newspaper recently wrote how most students who turn down admissions do so for non-financial reasons (acceptance at another high caliber school).  Indeed, the University has made every effort to eliminate finances as a reason for turning down admissions.

Also, for PhD programs, at least top ones like here, they are entirely free.  Although they don't live a lavish lifestyle, PhD students who graduate in less than 5 years should certainly not have any debt.  In fact, if a PhD student gets an outside grant that covers more than what the university gives you, the university pays YOU up to $3000 for your efforts to secure outside funds.

Just some clarity...

I've talked to some law firm recruiters and they say they care about UG prestige if it's an Ivy or equivalent (i.e. Stanford, MIT) school. Those of us who didn't do well enough in HS to go to one of these schools will likely suffer a little during our hunt for employment. I'm planning on working just a little harder than my HYP classmates to make up for the lack of prestige. ;)

Or maybe were too poor? I can barely pay for my state UG, I sure as heck wasn't going to be able to get enough student loans/scholarships to pay for an IVY league. Law school is worth 100,000 to me in loans (thank god mine isn't going to be that much), but UG, where I took Geology 100 and English 101...definitely not worth it just for a name on a resume.

The problem is that Boomers and wealthier Gen X-ers think merit scholarships and need-based financial aid systems really work. It seems to be much more of a problem in Ph.D. programs than legal employment, though it still happens in law.

As for admissions, UG prestige seems to be more of an issue with some schools (Penn, Columbia, Chicago) than with others (NYU, GULC).  It's usually more a question of delay than anything else.
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Re: Importance of Undergrad School
« Reply #17 on: March 11, 2007, 05:08:47 PM »
I agree.  I graduated from an ivy debt free...I love the fact that all are need blind and will give you $$ if you need it.

I think maybe 10 years ago, a lot of this has been true.  More recently, most Ivies - and CERTAINLY HYP - have made sure that finances do not preclude you from attending.  Of course, if your parents can afford to send you here, then you get no money; but that obviously means you are not poor, if they've determined with rather lenient formulas that your parents' income can afford a $40k education.

I go to without a doubt the most generous HYP.  Anecdotally, I have one friend who literally chose to come here over her community college because it was cheaper (nothing here vs. $1000 at her community college).  Personally, my parents are certainly not poor, yet we were still offered grant funds to offset the burden of sending two kids to college. 

In short, I don't think that, if you had gotten into an HYP, finances should play that much of a role.  HYP certainly does not think it should (or at least mine) and makes it very clear to admitted students.  Also, the student newspaper recently wrote how most students who turn down admissions do so for non-financial reasons (acceptance at another high caliber school).  Indeed, the University has made every effort to eliminate finances as a reason for turning down admissions.

Also, for PhD programs, at least top ones like here, they are entirely free.  Although they don't live a lavish lifestyle, PhD students who graduate in less than 5 years should certainly not have any debt.  In fact, if a PhD student gets an outside grant that covers more than what the university gives you, the university pays YOU up to $3000 for your efforts to secure outside funds.

Just some clarity...

I've talked to some law firm recruiters and they say they care about UG prestige if it's an Ivy or equivalent (i.e. Stanford, MIT) school. Those of us who didn't do well enough in HS to go to one of these schools will likely suffer a little during our hunt for employment. I'm planning on working just a little harder than my HYP classmates to make up for the lack of prestige. ;)

Or maybe were too poor? I can barely pay for my state UG, I sure as heck wasn't going to be able to get enough student loans/scholarships to pay for an IVY league. Law school is worth 100,000 to me in loans (thank god mine isn't going to be that much), but UG, where I took Geology 100 and English 101...definitely not worth it just for a name on a resume.

The problem is that Boomers and wealthier Gen X-ers think merit scholarships and need-based financial aid systems really work. It seems to be much more of a problem in Ph.D. programs than legal employment, though it still happens in law.

As for admissions, UG prestige seems to be more of an issue with some schools (Penn, Columbia, Chicago) than with others (NYU, GULC).  It's usually more a question of delay than anything else.

Brown is need blind? I thought it was only need blind up to a point.

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Re: Importance of Undergrad School
« Reply #18 on: March 11, 2007, 05:10:41 PM »
I agree.  I graduated from an ivy debt free...I love the fact that all are need blind and will give you $$ if you need it.

I think maybe 10 years ago, a lot of this has been true.  More recently, most Ivies - and CERTAINLY HYP - have made sure that finances do not preclude you from attending.  Of course, if your parents can afford to send you here, then you get no money; but that obviously means you are not poor, if they've determined with rather lenient formulas that your parents' income can afford a $40k education.

I go to without a doubt the most generous HYP.  Anecdotally, I have one friend who literally chose to come here over her community college because it was cheaper (nothing here vs. $1000 at her community college).  Personally, my parents are certainly not poor, yet we were still offered grant funds to offset the burden of sending two kids to college. 

In short, I don't think that, if you had gotten into an HYP, finances should play that much of a role.  HYP certainly does not think it should (or at least mine) and makes it very clear to admitted students.  Also, the student newspaper recently wrote how most students who turn down admissions do so for non-financial reasons (acceptance at another high caliber school).  Indeed, the University has made every effort to eliminate finances as a reason for turning down admissions.

Also, for PhD programs, at least top ones like here, they are entirely free.  Although they don't live a lavish lifestyle, PhD students who graduate in less than 5 years should certainly not have any debt.  In fact, if a PhD student gets an outside grant that covers more than what the university gives you, the university pays YOU up to $3000 for your efforts to secure outside funds.

Just some clarity...

I've talked to some law firm recruiters and they say they care about UG prestige if it's an Ivy or equivalent (i.e. Stanford, MIT) school. Those of us who didn't do well enough in HS to go to one of these schools will likely suffer a little during our hunt for employment. I'm planning on working just a little harder than my HYP classmates to make up for the lack of prestige. ;)

Or maybe were too poor? I can barely pay for my state UG, I sure as heck wasn't going to be able to get enough student loans/scholarships to pay for an IVY league. Law school is worth 100,000 to me in loans (thank god mine isn't going to be that much), but UG, where I took Geology 100 and English 101...definitely not worth it just for a name on a resume.

The problem is that Boomers and wealthier Gen X-ers think merit scholarships and need-based financial aid systems really work. It seems to be much more of a problem in Ph.D. programs than legal employment, though it still happens in law.

As for admissions, UG prestige seems to be more of an issue with some schools (Penn, Columbia, Chicago) than with others (NYU, GULC).  It's usually more a question of delay than anything else.

Brown is need blind? I thought it was only need blind up to a point.

Nope it's need blind, though it wasn't the year I started.  It becamed 100% need blind for the class of 07 where before it was approx 95% need blind.
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Re: Importance of Undergrad School
« Reply #19 on: March 11, 2007, 05:20:16 PM »
aha, good to know that my information is old.