Law School Discussion

Athletes and Admissions

beeker

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Re: Athletes and Admissions
« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2007, 09:34:44 AM »
I didn't play a sport in college, but all three of my siblings did (D1 field hockey, D3 football, D3 lacrosse).  I think there is definitely going to be recognition on the part of the adcomms of the amount of time committment playing a varsity sport takes.  My brother, the football player, is in law school, had a decent but not stellar GPA and solid LSAT and is at a great school (top 25).  I think it probably helped him.  He didn't write any statement saying how much time it took up.

Personally, I would think an adcomm would look less kindly on a sport if you were to write any sort of statement about it.  My sister was D1 field hockey so I definitely understand the committment.  I also agree though with the people who have said that any time-consuming activity will be looked at the same way.  I spent 50 unpaid hours a week working on my UG's daily newspaper for most of my four years.  I almost think the fact that my big time-consumer wasn't a sport is a benefit to me, because I feel like with an activity like that, it is almost more acceptable to adcomms to highlight the amount of time and discipline it took, whereas it's not so much for a sport.  Does that make sense?  I don't know, just musing, I didn't write a statement or anything about it.

In conclusion, I think a sport definitely helps, although it can't explain away an terrible GPA and definitely can't offsett a middling LSAT score, but I think adcomms will recognize the time and committment.

Actually, a last thought...I think the fact that it's field hockey and not football or basketball or hockey helps you, because field hockey is so largely associated with prep schools and not with "dumb jocks" like football/basketball/hockey are to many people.

Anyway, just my two cents...good luck.

Re: Athletes and Admissions
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2007, 09:40:50 AM »
Playing a sport (and being good enough to help the school's team) ABSOLUTELY helps in undergraduate admissions, even in DIII. Actually, athletes have a BIG admission advantage in the Ivy League, believe it or not.

Re: Athletes and Admissions
« Reply #12 on: March 08, 2007, 09:56:04 AM »
Quote
What sport/conference? THIS MATTERS.

C-USA then we moved to A-10.

Re: Athletes and Admissions
« Reply #13 on: March 08, 2007, 10:25:21 AM »
clearly it helps in UG... we are discussing whether it helps for law school admissions or not..

i know of someone who got into Yale, a decent GPA (but by now means the top of our class) and the coach basically told him a 27 on his ACTs and he is in.  he pretty much nailed them tho!!! but he did nothing else.. just that 1 sport.. and actually, was a bench warmer all 4yrs (0 playing time!!) so by no means a top recruit!!!

for LS i would assume if u are on 'the bubble' and they want diversity, they may pick an athlete bc of the characteristics that goes along with them. i highly doubt what sport u play would be looked upon... i think captain honors, perhaps winning a big NCAA title... ect. would help.. but again, i think it would be a matter of 'soft' factors when u lie in that gray area...


keepitsimple

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Re: Athletes and Admissions
« Reply #14 on: March 08, 2007, 12:23:24 PM »
I wrestled division one and I feel that it helped with my total application. It was not my main focus for my ps. but I did mention it. I just talked about the two workouts a day and gone durring the week and weekends. This showed time managment and helped my less then stellar 3.2 lsac gpa

I feel that being an athlete helps on an application but do not think it makes a huge difference

Re: Athletes and Admissions
« Reply #15 on: March 08, 2007, 02:30:05 PM »
I believe that mentioning athletic pursuits can't hurt your application. Rather, I think it's just more information that can round out an application and/or help explain a lower gpa or lack of other academic pursuits (e.g., a thesis).

I was a D-1 athlete, and while I cited my athletic accomplishments on my resume, I did not mention them in my PS. 


Boss

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Re: Athletes and Admissions
« Reply #16 on: March 08, 2007, 02:37:13 PM »
I imagine the only way it would hurt would be if the particular adcom reading your app has a bias against athletes of certain sports, such as believing that your GPA is the result of profs bending around your schedule, not a good work ethic.

UT did admit though that while they have controls in place to prevent negative biases, they do allow positive biases, such as a adcom who loves baseball admits the file of a baseball player.

Overall though, I would think that it's the same with any other EC.  Someone might have a bias against football players, while another hates the miliary, and a third hate fraternity guys.  Meanwhile the 4th is a former football player who was in ROTC and a frat.  Go figure.

justGem

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Re: Athletes and Admissions
« Reply #17 on: March 08, 2007, 08:34:56 PM »
I ran Division I track in the ACC.  It was only mentioned under the "activities" section of my resume.  A friend who is at my same LS played DI football in the ACC but did not mention it in his personal statement either.  If you are able to relay your athletic experience anecdotally in your statement it couldn't hurt otherwise I have a hard time believing that a great percentage of reviewers are closely familiar with how much work goes into being a student athlete, especially in a division 1 program.

Captain

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Re: Athletes and Admissions
« Reply #18 on: March 08, 2007, 09:14:45 PM »
I ran Division I track in the ACC.  It was only mentioned under the "activities" section of my resume.  A friend who is at my same LS played DI football in the ACC but did not mention it in his personal statement either.  If you are able to relay your athletic experience anecdotally in your statement it couldn't hurt otherwise I have a hard time believing that a great percentage of reviewers are closely familiar with how much work goes into being a student athlete, especially in a division 1 program.

Well, if he played at Duke, then it hardly even counts as football.

justGem

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Re: Athletes and Admissions
« Reply #19 on: March 08, 2007, 09:59:01 PM »
I ran Division I track in the ACC.  It was only mentioned under the "activities" section of my resume.  A friend who is at my same LS played DI football in the ACC but did not mention it in his personal statement either.  If you are able to relay your athletic experience anecdotally in your statement it couldn't hurt otherwise I have a hard time believing that a great percentage of reviewers are closely familiar with how much work goes into being a student athlete, especially in a division 1 program.

Well, if he played at Duke, then it hardly even counts as football.

Lol... no Maryland, so I think it counted.