Law School Discussion

Question About CHEATING

Question About CHEATING
« on: March 02, 2007, 08:27:32 PM »
Has anyone known anyone who got caught cheating after the test? In other words, lets say someone took the test for you or you somehow cheated and now scored are releasted, how would you be notified if you got caught cheating? Would then even release the score? Does LSAC releasing the score mean that you didnt get caught? 

jillibean

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Re: Question About CHEATING
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2007, 08:33:21 PM »
I'm not sure but I took the test in december and the guy sitting next to me told me that he was taking the test for his brother. I would have said something to Lsac but our proctor didn't take seat assignments like she was supposed to-- they were twins by the way

Re: Question About CHEATING
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2007, 08:36:18 PM »
I didnt take the test.  I know someone who did and I know that he/she flat out cheated. There is also evidence to prove it considering he/she has taken the test twice.  The score was released so I was wondering If this means that LSAC didnt catch it or what

Astro

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Re: Question About CHEATING
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2007, 08:44:25 PM »
My mom cheated on a test once.  I disowned myself.

Lil Orphan Annie

Re: Question About CHEATING
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2007, 09:23:36 PM »
I'm pretty sure you'd be notified right away if you were caught cheating.  I don't think the proctors would pretend to be oblivious and surreptitiously slash a big "CHEATER" mark on your exam once you left. (Well I guess they COULD, if they're particularly sadistic).

Ersatz

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Re: Question About CHEATING
« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2007, 11:43:02 PM »
LSAT has always struck me as a test that's inherently difficult to cheat on, proctors and other general restrictions notwithstanding. About all someone could do is flip between sections once they were finished, but that means losing time in the section that's going on at that time. Looking at your neighbor's answers would be a crapshoot, and, with the score distribution being what it is, the odds are kind of stacked against sitting next to someone scoring 90% or better. Maybe I'm just naive.

kirps

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Re: Question About CHEATING
« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2007, 12:46:43 PM »
LSAT has always struck me as a test that's inherently difficult to cheat on, proctors and other general restrictions notwithstanding. About all someone could do is flip between sections once they were finished, but that means losing time in the section that's going on at that time. Looking at your neighbor's answers would be a crapshoot, and, with the score distribution being what it is, the odds are kind of stacked against sitting next to someone scoring 90% or better. Maybe I'm just naive.

Also because they distribute different versions of the test to most people in the room if I am not mistaken. LSAT cheating would have to be on a macro level as opposed to an individual question level (i.e. getting a twin to take your test for you as mentioned above) I think you would have to have special circumstances to be able to cheat effectively i.e. the aforementioned twin or an insider at LSAC...

smile

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Re: Question About CHEATING
« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2007, 06:11:41 PM »
LSAT has always struck me as a test that's inherently difficult to cheat on, proctors and other general restrictions notwithstanding. About all someone could do is flip between sections once they were finished, but that means losing time in the section that's going on at that time. Looking at your neighbor's answers would be a crapshoot, and, with the score distribution being what it is, the odds are kind of stacked against sitting next to someone scoring 90% or better. Maybe I'm just naive.

Also because they distribute different versions of the test to most people in the room if I am not mistaken. LSAT cheating would have to be on a macro level as opposed to an individual question level (i.e. getting a twin to take your test for you as mentioned above) I think you would have to have special circumstances to be able to cheat effectively i.e. the aforementioned twin or an insider at LSAC...

I think even the twin situation has serious potential to come back and bite you later because the fingerprinting leaves the door to getting caught open forever.

kirps

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Re: Question About CHEATING
« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2007, 06:15:17 PM »
LSAT has always struck me as a test that's inherently difficult to cheat on, proctors and other general restrictions notwithstanding. About all someone could do is flip between sections once they were finished, but that means losing time in the section that's going on at that time. Looking at your neighbor's answers would be a crapshoot, and, with the score distribution being what it is, the odds are kind of stacked against sitting next to someone scoring 90% or better. Maybe I'm just naive.

Also because they distribute different versions of the test to most people in the room if I am not mistaken. LSAT cheating would have to be on a macro level as opposed to an individual question level (i.e. getting a twin to take your test for you as mentioned above) I think you would have to have special circumstances to be able to cheat effectively i.e. the aforementioned twin or an insider at LSAC...

I think even the twin situation has serious potential to come back and bite you later because the fingerprinting leaves the door to getting caught open forever.


Oh, I had forgotten about the fingerprinting, well I mean after they made me drop my pants and turn my head and cough I was a little disoriented, but yeah, then you're screwed on record. But I think it does still stand that any cheating is not going to be question by question, you would have to have a pretty high-level plan.

JTG

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Re: Question About CHEATING
« Reply #9 on: March 03, 2007, 06:17:50 PM »
LSAT has always struck me as a test that's inherently difficult to cheat on, proctors and other general restrictions notwithstanding. About all someone could do is flip between sections once they were finished, but that means losing time in the section that's going on at that time. Looking at your neighbor's answers would be a crapshoot, and, with the score distribution being what it is, the odds are kind of stacked against sitting next to someone scoring 90% or better. Maybe I'm just naive.

Also because they distribute different versions of the test to most people in the room if I am not mistaken. LSAT cheating would have to be on a macro level as opposed to an individual question level (i.e. getting a twin to take your test for you as mentioned above) I think you would have to have special circumstances to be able to cheat effectively i.e. the aforementioned twin or an insider at LSAC...

I think even the twin situation has serious potential to come back and bite you later because the fingerprinting leaves the door to getting caught open forever.


Easy to get around. If your twin looks just like you, dress the same and go to the bathroom 1 minute into the first break. Most proctors won't accompany you. Make the switch then.