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Author Topic: what is the typical fin aid package  (Read 3764 times)

siski

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Re: what is the typical fin aid package
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2008, 11:49:33 PM »
So if my EFC can "potentially" cover a school's budget (even though the parentals aren't contributing), I'm not eligible for any Stafford money?

I was under the impression that virtually any citizen can borrow the $20,500/yr, and that the only difference that income or EFC makes is whether $8,500 of that is unsubsidized or not.

I believe your impression is correct.  That is what was stated at a recent law school open house, $20,500 regardless of need.   EFC for a law student is the same as your expected personal contribution, parents aren't considered, right?

Exactly. When you apply to law school, you are considered an independent, so your parents' income does not count in calculating EFC.

bt

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Re: what is the typical fin aid package
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2008, 11:59:51 PM »
After reading Ivey, I was under the impression that certain schools continue to take into account your parents' income (those that use CSS/Need Access) unless you are over 25.

t...

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Re: what is the typical fin aid package
« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2008, 01:44:46 AM »
So if my EFC can "potentially" cover a school's budget (even though the parentals aren't contributing), I'm not eligible for any Stafford money?

I was under the impression that virtually any citizen can borrow the $20,500/yr, and that the only difference that income or EFC makes is whether $8,500 of that is unsubsidized or not.

I believe your impression is correct.  That is what was stated at a recent law school open house, $20,500 regardless of need.   EFC for a law student is the same as your expected personal contribution, parents aren't considered, right?

Exactly. When you apply to law school, you are considered an independent, so your parents' income does not count in calculating EFC.

Certain schools ask you for your parents income, no matter your age and relationship with them.

Any school that uses the Need Access form will ask you for a very detailed financial record from your parents. Need Access is a real female dog, too.
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Cady on October 16, 2007, 10:41:52 PM

i rhink tyi'm inejying my fudgcicle too much

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Huey on February 07, 2007, 11:15:32 PM

I went to a party in an apartment in a silo once.

siski

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Re: what is the typical fin aid package
« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2008, 01:45:56 AM »
Regardless of what other schools do, the FAFSA doesn't take your parents' income into account when calculating the EFC it reports to schools.

t...

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Re: what is the typical fin aid package
« Reply #14 on: January 11, 2008, 01:51:07 AM »
Regardless of what other schools do, the FAFSA doesn't take your parents' income into account when calculating the EFC it reports to schools.

This is certainly true.

Also, whether or not (or how) your parents' reported income on the Need Access form affects your loan/grant package at those certain schools is unknown to me.
Quote
Cady on October 16, 2007, 10:41:52 PM

i rhink tyi'm inejying my fudgcicle too much

Quote
Huey on February 07, 2007, 11:15:32 PM

I went to a party in an apartment in a silo once.

bt

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Re: what is the typical fin aid package
« Reply #15 on: January 11, 2008, 01:53:20 AM »
Right.  For instance, the University of Texas only requires the FAFSA.  However, most of the T14 are private schools and most (all?) require the Need Access or CSS Profile form.  If things are like they are at my current college, the CSS Profile means the school will calculate your EFC using your parents' income information and you get boned in the end, comparatively.