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Author Topic: Black LSAT statistics  (Read 16884 times)

flyaway

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Re: Black LSAT statistics
« Reply #80 on: February 28, 2007, 07:40:15 PM »
"People born in Spain aren't Hispanic and don't receive a boost.  Hispanic is Hispanic"

okay.  I did not know people from Spain aren't considered Hispanic.  At any rate, thats just one example.  Cubans ARE Hispanic, yet they don't receive the Mexican boost.  Hispanic is not Hispanic.  Some Hispanics get greater boosts than others.  Why does nationaility matter with Hispanics, but not with blacks?  Again, I posit that it is a way to tweak the numbers.  I disagree with that strategy.  It is disingenuous.  Otherwise, be the same across the board.


I didn't know that Mexican = Hispanic.

Hispanic refers to the ppl from the Spanish diaspora iirc, that's why Spainards aren't considered hispanic.

I didn't know what that meant, so I went to wikpedia (yes I know I'm not black, but there are still interesting topics here sometimes):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hispanic

This makes me thinks there are stricter and looser definitions.
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Re: Black LSAT statistics
« Reply #81 on: March 01, 2007, 03:42:41 AM »
from wikipedia:


"Hispanic" specifically refers to Spain, and to the Spanish-speaking nations of the Americas, as cultural and demographic extensions of Spain. It should be further noted that in a U.S. context, a Hispanic population consists of the people of Spain and everyone with origins in any of Spanish-speaking nations of the Americas, regardless of ancestry of the latter (including Amerindians). In the context of Spain and Latin America, a Hispanic population consists of the people of Spain, and when regarding the inhabitants of the Spanish-speaking nations of the Americas, includes only criollos, mestizos, mulattos, and others with Spanish ancestry, to the exclusion of indigenous Amerindians, unmixed descendants of black Africans and whites or other peoples from later migrations without any Spanish lineage.

yeah.  knew i wasnt crazy.  This is the U.S. right?

at any rate, i think there is some confusion about this because alot of people we would call hispanic have fought off the term hispanic.  choosing latino and chicano instead.  they basically created new terms to better fit what they beleive themselves to be, and to demarcate where they differ from "hispanics".  I'm not mad.  I think American born blacks should follow suit.  thats a different conversation however, and one i really dont feel like debating.  I will say, drawing that line has benefitted them.  at least as far as aa goes.  kudos.  nonetheless, cubans and mexicans are considered hispanic in the broader sense (as far as the U.S. is concerned) - same way Texas is Texas and not Tejas.

Hispanic is not hispanic.  as some people from Spanish-speaking nations of the Americas receive greater boosts than others.  They account for nationality. 
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Re: Black LSAT statistics
« Reply #82 on: March 26, 2007, 03:22:39 PM »
This whole nationality argument is idiotic.  I think that affirmative action has served its usefulness and should be done away with.  Racism has been stomped out as much as it can be.  I'm white and I have met soooooo many black and Hispanic, Mexican, Latino (whatever they are called) racists.  Everyone thinks that only white people are racist and it is just not true.  The majority of white people are very tolerant and understanding, probably more so than most minorities.  As a child, I had it crammed into my mind that I was a horrible person for being white.  Once I got out into the real world and saw how people really acted, I quickly saw that this was not the case.  The only way to make school as fair as possible is to look at what a person has done, IE scores and experience. 

Besides, there are so many mixed people these days that using "race" as a factor for getting into school is misleading at best. 

leostrauss

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Re: Black LSAT statistics
« Reply #83 on: March 26, 2007, 03:27:47 PM »
This whole nationality argument is idiotic.  I think that affirmative action has served its usefulness and should be done away with.  Racism has been stomped out as much as it can be.  I'm white and I have met soooooo many black and Hispanic, Mexican, Latino (whatever they are called) racists.  Everyone thinks that only white people are racist and it is just not true.  The majority of white people are very tolerant and understanding, probably more so than most minorities.  As a child, I had it crammed into my mind that I was a horrible person for being white.  Once I got out into the real world and saw how people really acted, I quickly saw that this was not the case.  The only way to make school as fair as possible is to look at what a person has done, IE scores and experience. 

Besides, there are so many mixed people these days that using "race" as a factor for getting into school is misleading at best. 

wow, you're right . .. it's so simple. False alarm everybody! Forget about it.
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1654134681665465

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Re: Black LSAT statistics
« Reply #84 on: March 26, 2007, 06:57:44 PM »
So many problems in this country ARE simple.  It is just that nobody has the balls to step up to the plate and to something about it.  Everyone is too afraid to do anything about it. 

Affirmative Action is broken and out of date.  Nothing will get done about it unless enough people actually say something about it. 

Smokey

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Re: Black LSAT statistics
« Reply #85 on: March 26, 2007, 08:03:41 PM »
This whole nationality argument is idiotic.  I think that affirmative action has served its usefulness and should be done away with.  Racism has been stomped out as much as it can be.  I'm white and I have met soooooo many black and Hispanic, Mexican, Latino (whatever they are called) racists.  Everyone thinks that only white people are racist and it is just not true.  The majority of white people are very tolerant and understanding, probably more so than most minorities.  As a child, I had it crammed into my mind that I was a horrible person for being white.  Once I got out into the real world and saw how people really acted, I quickly saw that this was not the case.  The only way to make school as fair as possible is to look at what a person has done, IE scores and experience. 

Besides, there are so many mixed people these days that using "race" as a factor for getting into school is misleading at best. 


I definitely agree that there are Black and Hispanic racists, but the thing is that racism on an individual level doesn't matter.   It doesn't matter when individual white people are racist either.  What matters is institutional racism, because this is what kills people, keeps people from getting jobs, apts, loans, houses, being elected into political office, etc.  Blacks and Hispanics aren't really in the position to hurt whites by implementing institutional racism against them, so these biases aren't as important as far as policy is concerned.

Ulfrekr

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Re: Black LSAT statistics
« Reply #86 on: March 27, 2007, 11:28:53 AM »
Quote
Blacks and Hispanics aren't really in the position to hurt whites by implementing institutional racism against them, so these biases aren't as important as far as policy is concerned.

Seriously. Why is this so hard for people to grasp?

Also, this right here:
Quote
The majority of white people are very tolerant and understanding, probably more so than most minorities.
is itself a racist statement.

And ALSO, I'm not really sure what to make of this:
Quote
Besides, there are so many mixed people these days that using "race" as a factor for getting into school is misleading at best.
and would like some clarification on what was trying to be said there.
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Re: Black LSAT statistics
« Reply #87 on: March 28, 2007, 04:02:53 PM »
First of all, saying that white people are "very tolerant and understanding, probably more so than most minorities" is not a racist statement.  It is an observation I have made having grown up in a majority white suburb-then living in Newark, NJ where there were more blacks and hispanics than whites.  Seeing blacks attack hispanics because many are illegal and carry a lot of cash on them, and hearing many hispanics refer to blacks in horribly racist terms was quite common.  In addition, white people (including myself) have been told that we are such a horrible bunch of people for white people did in the past (not even my ancestors).  I have had "tolerance" crammed down my throat from the first day of school.  Me, and many of my classmates, openly accepted this-which is why I was shocked at what I saw when I lived in Newark. 

In response to "institutional racism"-so when whites are the minority and are in a position to be hurt by the impelmenting of institutional racism, will there by policies for their protection?   While there might be institutional racism at the career level, colleges are WELL past this point.  Why can't students just be accepted for what they have accomplished and not for the color of their skin?

Quote
Besides, there are so many mixed people these days that using "race" as a factor for getting into school is misleading at best.
and would like some clarification on what was trying to be said there.
This refers to AA.  I've met people who don't consider themselves one race or another.  How can race be used in the admissions process when people don't identify themselves as a particular race?  You can't-at least not fairly. 

People want AA because it gives them an advantage-not because they feel that it is morally justified.  It is the embodiment of racism-using race to benefit one group over another. 

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Re: Black LSAT statistics
« Reply #88 on: March 28, 2007, 04:14:51 PM »
People want AA because it gives them an advantage-not because they feel that it is morally justified.  It is the embodiment of racism-using race to benefit one group over another. 

Try again.  Most of the people around here who advocate for affirmative action are not in a position to benefit from it (except by attending more diverse schools), and a lot of the people who are in a position to benefit from it do not support it.  The notion that it is simply a matter of crass self-interest really should be dead by now.
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1654134681665465

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Re: Black LSAT statistics
« Reply #89 on: March 28, 2007, 04:28:57 PM »
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ry again.  Most of the people around here who advocate for affirmative action are not in a position to benefit from it (except by attending more diverse schools), and a lot of the people who are in a position to benefit from it do not support it.  The notion that it is simply a matter of crass self-interest really should be dead by now.

Where is your evidence?  How do you know that most people who support it won't benefit from it?  Unless there is some evidence to back this up, then you have no way of knowing.