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Author Topic: Relaxation/Concentration Techniques  (Read 691 times)

sketch

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Relaxation/Concentration Techniques
« on: February 11, 2007, 03:18:39 PM »
I'm looking for fresh perspectives on how to get "in the zone" for the LSAT.  Someone suggested some deep breathing before beginning the test, imagining that blue air is being inhaled and red air is being exhaled.  I tried this before taking a section while I was studying yesterday, and I was surprised at how much it helped me.

Any ideas along those lines?  Anything specific work (or not work at all) for those of you who took the test yesterday?

Ghilly

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Re: Relaxation/Concentration Techniques
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2007, 03:56:12 PM »
I'm looking for fresh perspectives on how to get "in the zone" for the LSAT.  Someone suggested some deep breathing before beginning the test, imagining that blue air is being inhaled and red air is being exhaled.  I tried this before taking a section while I was studying yesterday, and I was surprised at how much it helped me.

Any ideas along those lines?  Anything specific work (or not work at all) for those of you who took the test yesterday?

Yesterday I did some (discreet) breathing exercises while the proctor read instructions.  I ended up so relaxed by the start of the test, that I proceeded through my first section too slowly and almost blew the section.  It's actually why I'm hoping that Kaplan's correct (but I know they're not).


deltaAoverT

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Re: Relaxation/Concentration Techniques
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2007, 04:09:54 PM »
Don't go into the room really really early.  You'll be sitting for a while (the ticket says it could be 7 hours, but it's more like 5-5.5), so walk around while you can.  I practiced my golf swing... Required breathing, got me moving a little bit, and wasn't thinking about the test  :)

emily83

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Re: Relaxation/Concentration Techniques
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2007, 04:51:49 PM »
i try to avoid talking to other people at all costs. 
i guess others may feel differently but in my experience (not just with the LSAT but with any major test) if you're interacting with people before the test you will hear 1 of 2 kinds of people:  Person 1 will tell anyone who will listen how they've been studying 14 hours/day for last 10 months and how they can do an entire LG section in under 9 minutes and how they're averaging 182 on all their practice tests.  Person B is almost in tears, can barely stand up probably due to the fact that they haven't eaten or slept in 2 weeks, and is completely and utterly terrified by the entire process.
either person (and the many in between) can totally have an effect on your nerves and your mental clarity.  i totally keep to myself and don't get sucked into the hype... and it seems to have worked yesterday... (i hope)

UChi2L

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Re: Relaxation/Concentration Techniques
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2007, 05:02:39 PM »
Download "Picture of Jesus" by Ben Harper.  Not for the religious message (although if you're so inclined, it's a bonus), but because it's a totally relaxing African spiritual-type song.  I listen to it before every exam.
I have to believe in a world outside my own mind. I have to believe that my actions still have meaning, even if I can't remember them. I have to believe that when my eyes are closed, the world's still there. Do I believe the world's still there? Is it still out there?... Yeah.

deltaAoverT

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Re: Relaxation/Concentration Techniques
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2007, 05:37:05 PM »
I second the Ben Harper song

Skipper

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Re: Relaxation/Concentration Techniques
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2007, 08:47:05 PM »
- maintain a regular exercise schedule in the weeks leading up to the exam
- don't burn out in the weeks leading up to the exam
- when you start panicking on the test, stop for a moment, breathe, and say to yourself "I KNOW THIS STUFF" - remind yourself of a practice test where you did your best. Imagine yourself definitively and confidently picking answer choices.