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Author Topic: Getting a U.S Student Visa - An Overview  (Read 5770 times)

Astro

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Re: Getting a U.S Student Visa - An Overview
« Reply #20 on: February 16, 2007, 02:35:44 PM »
Nope.  But you do have that available sans NAFTA/HB-1.
J, if you didn't bring enough penis for everyone, you shouldn't have brought any penis at all. 

sladkaya

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Re: Getting a U.S Student Visa - An Overview
« Reply #21 on: February 16, 2007, 04:34:13 PM »
It's very simple.  If you have a job, you're safe.  If you don't have a job, you're living on borrowed time (your CPT or OPT, which adds up to a year, max).

But you can imagine what a hassle it would be to have to move out of the country and then have to move back again.  It's nothing to panic about, but it could be a major pain in the ass.


 ;D

Haha, sorry, I missed that post.  I don't think you can stay in the country on OPT if you're not working, however.

You can if you can document that you are actively seeking employment at that time - log of jobs you applied to, interviews, resumes sent out, etc.  I personally know someone who's done that.  On an H-1 though, if you lose your job, you have 60 days, I think, to find a new employer or pack up and leave.

One more thing - to apply for the F-1, your school needs to issue an I-20 to you - just ask the admissions office after you pay your deposit.  Then make a consulate appointment and use the link J gave you to get all your supporting docs together.
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FunkyzeitmitBruno

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Re: Getting a U.S Student Visa - An Overview
« Reply #22 on: February 16, 2007, 07:27:09 PM »
It's very simple.  If you have a job, you're safe.  If you don't have a job, you're living on borrowed time (your CPT or OPT, which adds up to a year, max).

But you can imagine what a hassle it would be to have to move out of the country and then have to move back again.  It's nothing to panic about, but it could be a major pain in the ass.


 ;D

Haha, sorry, I missed that post.  I don't think you can stay in the country on OPT if you're not working, however.

You can if you can document that you are actively seeking employment at that time - log of jobs you applied to, interviews, resumes sent out, etc.  I personally know someone who's done that.  On an H-1 though, if you lose your job, you have 60 days, I think, to find a new employer or pack up and leave.

One more thing - to apply for the F-1, your school needs to issue an I-20 to you - just ask the admissions office after you pay your deposit.  Then make a consulate appointment and use the link J gave you to get all your supporting docs together.

If you're Canadian, you don't need to get a consulate/embassy appointment. In fact, you don't need an F1 visa in the same way that non-Canadian international students do.

All you need is your I-20. Go to the border whenever you're ready to leave Canada, show the I-20, proof that you can pay for your education, acceptance letter, and passport (in fact only the I-20 and passport are needed in practice, but in theory you need all 4). They'll give you an I-94 when you cross the border marked F-1 on it.

Astro

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Re: Getting a U.S Student Visa - An Overview
« Reply #23 on: February 16, 2007, 07:53:25 PM »
Funkyzeit with the win.
J, if you didn't bring enough penis for everyone, you shouldn't have brought any penis at all. 

Geo_Storm

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Re: Getting a U.S Student Visa - An Overview
« Reply #24 on: February 16, 2007, 10:13:45 PM »
It's very simple.  If you have a job, you're safe.  If you don't have a job, you're living on borrowed time (your CPT or OPT, which adds up to a year, max).

But you can imagine what a hassle it would be to have to move out of the country and then have to move back again.  It's nothing to panic about, but it could be a major pain in the ass.


 ;D

Haha, sorry, I missed that post.  I don't think you can stay in the country on OPT if you're not working, however.

You can if you can document that you are actively seeking employment at that time - log of jobs you applied to, interviews, resumes sent out, etc.  I personally know someone who's done that.  On an H-1 though, if you lose your job, you have 60 days, I think, to find a new employer or pack up and leave.

One more thing - to apply for the F-1, your school needs to issue an I-20 to you - just ask the admissions office after you pay your deposit.  Then make a consulate appointment and use the link J gave you to get all your supporting docs together.

If you're Canadian, you don't need to get a consulate/embassy appointment. In fact, you don't need an F1 visa in the same way that non-Canadian international students do.

All you need is your I-20. Go to the border whenever you're ready to leave Canada, show the I-20, proof that you can pay for your education, acceptance letter, and passport (in fact only the I-20 and passport are needed in practice, but in theory you need all 4). They'll give you an I-94 when you cross the border marked F-1 on it.

Where do I get this I-20? And what constitutes proof of my ability to pay?
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Astro

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Re: Getting a U.S Student Visa - An Overview
« Reply #25 on: February 16, 2007, 10:20:27 PM »
Loan forms/signed statements about your parents' finances from the bank/etc.
J, if you didn't bring enough penis for everyone, you shouldn't have brought any penis at all. 

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Re: Getting a U.S Student Visa - An Overview
« Reply #26 on: February 27, 2007, 11:42:52 PM »
Yes, you will need an F-1. For this, you need - at least - a formal letter of acceptance, and proof of sufficient funds. You must also show some substantial ties to Canada; something that would make you come back and not escape to the US wilderness. They ask for an address, usually. It can be your parents. 'Substantial ties' is rather broad.

And get ready for stupid questions like "why do you want to study US law"? And you must absolutely not tell them that you plan on staying in the US afterwards. You are there for studies, and then you come back.

Really?  Ugh.  And I thought the U.S. customs were bullies.  What the hell does Canada care if I decide I want a change of scenery and move out?  Are they going to DENY me the F-1 if I tell them the truth: i.e., "I am spending the extra money for US schooling because I obviously want to practice there seeing as a degree from there would be useless in Canada anyway?"  I don't see what I can B.S. to make them believe otherwise..."Oh yeah, I'm dropping fifty grand a year just for boredom's sake...don't you worry, I'll be back in Canada after three years, lickety split!" Honestly. 

nerfco

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Re: Getting a U.S Student Visa - An Overview
« Reply #27 on: February 28, 2007, 12:03:34 AM »
Yes, you will need an F-1. For this, you need - at least - a formal letter of acceptance, and proof of sufficient funds. You must also show some substantial ties to Canada; something that would make you come back and not escape to the US wilderness. They ask for an address, usually. It can be your parents. 'Substantial ties' is rather broad.

And get ready for stupid questions like "why do you want to study US law"? And you must absolutely not tell them that you plan on staying in the US afterwards. You are there for studies, and then you come back.

Really?  Ugh.  And I thought the U.S. customs were bullies.  What the hell does Canada care if I decide I want a change of scenery and move out?  Are they going to DENY me the F-1 if I tell them the truth: i.e., "I am spending the extra money for US schooling because I obviously want to practice there seeing as a degree from there would be useless in Canada anyway?"  I don't see what I can B.S. to make them believe otherwise..."Oh yeah, I'm dropping fifty grand a year just for boredom's sake...don't you worry, I'll be back in Canada after three years, lickety split!" Honestly. 

Err, I believe all these questions are asked by the US. Canada isn't trying to keep you in, the US is trying to keep you out. The US wants you to have ties to Canada, so they know you aren't trying to immigrate to America. Even though you are.

Astro

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Re: Getting a U.S Student Visa - An Overview
« Reply #28 on: February 28, 2007, 02:15:48 AM »
Bingo.
J, if you didn't bring enough penis for everyone, you shouldn't have brought any penis at all. 

MorningStar

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Re: Getting a U.S Student Visa - An Overview
« Reply #29 on: March 01, 2007, 05:45:39 PM »
I think I'm getting a better understanding of how this process works but one big question still remains;  What is the contingency plan should one be unable to secure employment?  Also it is my understanding that a green card can take 5 years + to be approved even if you are sponsored by your employer.  This means you are required to stay with this employer, less you start the whole process again. 

If I spend 150,000$ on a U.S education I need to be sure I won't be booted back to Canada (which I now cannot practice in). 

Furthermore do you think Law firms would be much less likely to hire a Canadian graduate given the complications of their immigration status? 

!! I find the citizenship issue more stressful then the financing of a U.S legal education.