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Author Topic: Taking the LSAT twice  (Read 1012 times)

DS8

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Taking the LSAT twice
« on: January 30, 2007, 09:19:01 PM »
Do all schools average the two scores? Which schools don't do this?

DS8

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Re: Taking the LSAT twice
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2007, 09:31:42 PM »
Thank you very much!

h2xblive

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Re: Taking the LSAT twice
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2007, 09:40:22 AM »
Please note that some schools will not flat out say "we take the higher score."  Most schools that I've spoken with (about 25) have said any of the following:

1. We average scores
2. We look at both scores in a holistic/big picture sense.
3. We put more emphasis on the higher score, but we still can see all the scores.
4. We put more emphasis on the higher score, but we still look at both scores.
5. We look at both scores, unless you give us an addendum telling us why we should put more weight on the higher score.
6. We take the higher score if there's an X point difference between scores.

Also know that unless a school is averaging LSAT scores, almost none of them want an LSAT addendum unless you really have something to say other than, "I just took a class/studied harder the second time."

prelaw200

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Re: Taking the LSAT twice
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2007, 09:46:07 AM »
Please note that some schools will not flat out say "we take the higher score."  Most schools that I've spoken with (about 25) have said any of the following:

1. We average scores
2. We look at both scores in a holistic/big picture sense.
3. We put more emphasis on the higher score, but we still can see all the scores.
4. We put more emphasis on the higher score, but we still look at both scores.
5. We look at both scores, unless you give us an addendum telling us why we should put more weight on the higher score.
6. We take the higher score if there's an X point difference between scores.

Also know that unless a school is averaging LSAT scores, almost none of them want an LSAT addendum unless you really have something to say other than, "I just took a class/studied harder the second time."

"almost none" is too strong.  this website compiled as list of schools that want explanations: http://www.deloggio.com/academic/twolsat.htm

also, check out the schools websites, some (Mich and Cornell) explicitly invite you to provide an explanation.
Me Go Cornell

h2xblive

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Re: Taking the LSAT twice
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2007, 09:49:05 AM »
Please note that some schools will not flat out say "we take the higher score."  Most schools that I've spoken with (about 25) have said any of the following:

1. We average scores
2. We look at both scores in a holistic/big picture sense.
3. We put more emphasis on the higher score, but we still can see all the scores.
4. We put more emphasis on the higher score, but we still look at both scores.
5. We look at both scores, unless you give us an addendum telling us why we should put more weight on the higher score.
6. We take the higher score if there's an X point difference between scores.

Also know that unless a school is averaging LSAT scores, almost none of them want an LSAT addendum unless you really have something to say other than, "I just took a class/studied harder the second time."

"almost none" is too strong.  this website compiled as list of schools that want explanations: http://www.deloggio.com/academic/twolsat.htm

also, check out the schools websites, some (Mich and Cornell) explicitly invite you to provide an explanation.

Fair enough.  For the schools I called up, I think 5% wanted my LSAT addendum after I explained what it would say.

You're right, I'm sure alot of the top schools are different than the schools I applied to.

EDIT: That list is flat out wrong.  I applied to a few schools (4 or 5) on that list, and after calling and asking about an addendum for multiple scores, they convinced me it wasn't necessary.

prelaw200

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Re: Taking the LSAT twice
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2007, 09:55:10 AM »
Please note that some schools will not flat out say "we take the higher score."  Most schools that I've spoken with (about 25) have said any of the following:

1. We average scores
2. We look at both scores in a holistic/big picture sense.
3. We put more emphasis on the higher score, but we still can see all the scores.
4. We put more emphasis on the higher score, but we still look at both scores.
5. We look at both scores, unless you give us an addendum telling us why we should put more weight on the higher score.
6. We take the higher score if there's an X point difference between scores.

Also know that unless a school is averaging LSAT scores, almost none of them want an LSAT addendum unless you really have something to say other than, "I just took a class/studied harder the second time."

"almost none" is too strong.  this website compiled as list of schools that want explanations: http://www.deloggio.com/academic/twolsat.htm

also, check out the schools websites, some (Mich and Cornell) explicitly invite you to provide an explanation.

Fair enough.  For the schools I called up, I think 5% wanted my LSAT addendum after I explained what it would say.

You're right, I'm sure alot of the top schools are different than the schools I applied to.

EDIT: That list is flat out wrong.  I applied to a few schools (4 or 5) on that list, and after calling and asking about an addendum for multiple scores, they convinced me it wasn't necessary.

It may depend on who you talk to in the admissions office, I'm sure there's no formal policy.  I think it doesn't hurt to provide one unless you say you were lazy the first time around. 
Me Go Cornell

h2xblive

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Re: Taking the LSAT twice
« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2007, 09:58:26 AM »
It may depend on who you talk to in the admissions office, I'm sure there's no formal policy.  I think it doesn't hurt to provide one unless you say you were lazy the first time around. 

You're right.  What's on the website isn't always consistent with what an admissions officer or worker says.

Root Hog

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Re: Taking the LSAT twice
« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2007, 10:14:02 AM »
Truthfully, regardless of what they say in writing, they don't care for an addendum. In fact, I spoke to many who privately tell me they get sick of the excuses. There are very few excuses that do not look like weak attempts (this includes being sick, havinmg a family member die, etc.). All they care about is what score they can report. I'm all over the board with three tests - 159, 172, 167. All most look at is the 172, because that is the number that perhaps lets them push up their 75% a point. Another secret is that if you are above the 75% LSAT range by one point, it's just as good to them as being 12 over as long as your GPA doesn't fall under the 25%. The scholarship money will be different, though. In addition, here is why LSAT matters so much more than GPA. LSAT works in whole numbers. If you fall above the 75% range in LSAT, you could possibly move their 75% up by a point (at least you and a couple more like you could). A point move on the LSAT is huge. On the other hand, a high GPA most likely would only move them up by .01. The difference between their 75% LSAT being 164 and 165 could move them up a rank in the USNWR, but a jump in GPA from 3.76 to 3.77 will likely have little effect. It's all about the numbers.

mantis

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Re: Taking the LSAT twice
« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2007, 10:19:21 AM »
Truthfully, regardless of what they say in writing, they don't care for an addendum. In fact, I spoke to many who privately tell me they get sick of the excuses. There are very few excuses that do not look like weak attempts (this includes being sick, havinmg a family member die, etc.). All they care about is what score they can report. I'm all over the board with three tests - 159, 172, 167. All most look at is the 172, because that is the number that perhaps lets them push up their 75% a point. Another secret is that if you are above the 75% LSAT range by one point, it's just as good to them as being 12 over as long as your GPA doesn't fall under the 25%. The scholarship money will be different, though. In addition, here is why LSAT matters so much more than GPA. LSAT works in whole numbers. If you fall above the 75% range in LSAT, you could possibly move their 75% up by a point (at least you and a couple more like you could). A point move on the LSAT is huge. On the other hand, a high GPA most likely would only move them up by .01. The difference between their 75% LSAT being 164 and 165 could move them up a rank in the USNWR, but a jump in GPA from 3.76 to 3.77 will likely have little effect. It's all about the numbers.

This is also what I'm thinking... After reading that deloggio thing I thought, "oh god, what if I DO need an addendum?"  But I find this commentary to be more convincing.  I agree that they've probably heard (and are tired of) every excuse in the book.  And I don't really have a good reason for my improvement.  I was more relaxed, I paced myself more efficiently on reading comp, whatever.  If they ask, I'm happy to talk about it.  But unless they do, I think I'm just going to let it go.

prelaw200

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Re: Taking the LSAT twice
« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2007, 10:19:34 AM »
Truthfully, regardless of what they say in writing, they don't care for an addendum. In fact, I spoke to many who privately tell me they get sick of the excuses. There are very few excuses that do not look like weak attempts (this includes being sick, havinmg a family member die, etc.). All they care about is what score they can report. I'm all over the board with three tests - 159, 172, 167. All most look at is the 172, because that is the number that perhaps lets them push up their 75% a point. Another secret is that if you are above the 75% LSAT range by one point, it's just as good to them as being 12 over as long as your GPA doesn't fall under the 25%. The scholarship money will be different, though. In addition, here is why LSAT matters so much more than GPA. LSAT works in whole numbers. If you fall above the 75% range in LSAT, you could possibly move their 75% up by a point (at least you and a couple more like you could). A point move on the LSAT is huge. On the other hand, a high GPA most likely would only move them up by .01. The difference between their 75% LSAT being 164 and 165 could move them up a rank in the USNWR, but a jump in GPA from 3.76 to 3.77 will likely have little effect. It's all about the numbers.

US News weighs it more heavily in the rankings.  This is probably the biggest reason schools weight it more heavily.
Me Go Cornell