Law School Discussion

should I write an addendum?

nealric

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should I write an addendum?
« on: January 09, 2007, 02:32:42 PM »
On my first real lsat I freaked out and got a 161

On the second I just now finnished a long saga with a misbubbling error. Long story shory, they corrected my misbubble and I got a 165. However, I did miss one question due the the misbubbling handscore and should have gotten a 166. Is that worth an addendum or would that just come off as whiny?

Also, on the retake, I completely tanked on the LG section immediatly after I disovered the misbubble (-8). My LR sections were -2 & -1 for perspective. On my previous LSAT, I scored -4 on LG. Would it be worth adding that to the addendum as well?

I really feel like I should have been in the 168-170 range (which is where I was practicing)

"V"

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Re: should I write an addendum?
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2007, 06:49:38 PM »
Pressure and mistakes are a part of the experience. Most people's scores drop on actual test day. To send such an addendum would be silly, and probably hurt your chances. Things like this, user error, are things anyone could complain about. It's tantamount to someone sending an addendum about being nervous, and how they practice tested two points higher. Nervousness and errors are a part of the LSAT score - it doesn't just measure your ability, it measures your ability under pressure.

Congratualations on the score though, very high.

bamf

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Re: should I write an addendum?
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2007, 11:31:05 AM »
On my first real lsat I freaked out and got a 161

On the second I just now finnished a long saga with a misbubbling error. Long story shory, they corrected my misbubble and I got a 165. However, I did miss one question due the the misbubbling handscore and should have gotten a 166. Is that worth an addendum or would that just come off as whiny?

Also, on the retake, I completely tanked on the LG section immediatly after I disovered the misbubble (-8). My LR sections were -2 & -1 for perspective. On my previous LSAT, I scored -4 on LG. Would it be worth adding that to the addendum as well?

I really feel like I should have been in the 168-170 range (which is where I was practicing)
hell no
165 is a great score that most people would glady have since it's in the 92%
making excuses for being in the top 10% instead of the top 2% would be super whiny


True

nealric

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Re: should I write an addendum?
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2007, 04:21:01 PM »
just to clarify... Im not whining that I "only" got a 165 and I deserve better.

I'm extremely happy with my LSAT outcome (I mean, the LSAC didnt have to correct my misbubble at all)

wolfpack2

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Re: should I write an addendum?
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2007, 10:25:28 PM »
just to clarify... Im not whining that I "only" got a 165 and I deserve better.

I'm extremely happy with my LSAT outcome (I mean, the LSAC didnt have to correct my misbubble at all)

It would seem whiny to me if I were the one reading it. I think 165 is great and an addendum probably wont affect your application.

EEtoJD

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Re: should I write an addendum?
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2007, 11:13:04 PM »
Just because the score difference is so small, I wouldn't. However, let me just repost part something I posted in another thread (some of this is relevant, some, not so much, but just to cover a little more...):

===============

According to Anna Ivey and the websites of a few schools, an addendum can be a good thing depending on the situation.

BTW, despite what others here would think, a lot of adcomms actually expect to see an addendum if you've retaken the LSAT and performed better the second time. They want to see a sympathetic case and some sort of assurance that it was an anomaly. From here:

http://career.berkeley.edu/Law/LawApp.stm

Quote
You may have a weakness on your application that needs clarification. You can use an addendum or a small portion of your personal statement to address weaknesses. By using an addendum, a brief explanation on an extra sheet of paper included in your application, you can provide some additional information and leave the focus of your personal statement on other topics.

It may be helpful to use an addendum in the following situations:

    * If you feel your grades do not reflect your true abilities
    * If you feel your LSAT score does not accurately reflect your potential for success in law school

When offering explanations for weaknesses, be brief and sincere while offering a sympathetic explanation, and assure the admissions committee that a similar weakness is unlikely to occur again.

Also, the reason people don't cancel their first score even if something bad happened to them is because they really have no idea how they did (I speak from experience). I took in Sept. and wanted to get my apps in ASAP, but I seriously underperformed. It came as a huge shock. In fact, Anna Ivey has said this exact thing (that people don't cancel because they have no idea how they did) in her advice column on Vault.

http://www.vault.com/nr/newsmain.jsp?nr_page=3&ch_id=351&article_id=27166599&cat_id=2711

Quote
"Very few people walk out of the LSAT feeling confident, even people who end up with high scores. If everyone canceled a score just because he had a general sense of unease, nobody would ever have a score."


EEtoJD

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Re: should I write an addendum?
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2007, 11:26:11 PM »

i think the preface of the OP made that clear. addendums are important and valueable. how to use it properly was the issue. cancelling is a diff topic

Sure, which is why I said some of that wasn't necessarily relevant. But if he did choose to write one, despite what us geniuses say, he might do well to say that he didn't cancel because he didn't know how he did or something. But again, too small a point difference for that to be much of an issue.

An addendum just for misbubbling, though? I dunno... sounds, um, excusey.