Law School Discussion

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Re: Nannies Don't Want to Work for Black Families
« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2006, 11:07:28 AM »
I didn't realise that racism was so rampant amongst the nanny set.  I had always planned on having some type of help with my kids because I'll have no family around (if I stay in the US) and will prolly have to work late some of the time.  Then again, their dad will have more flexible hours.

The racism is sad, but not surprising to me.

I think it would be good if mothers in different cities would begin to compile lists of nannies and agencies willing to work in their area, to avoid having to be bothered with racist ones during the search for help.  I know there's a group called "Mocha Moms," that sponsors play dates and such for Black kids, I wonder if they have a "nanny database?"

pikey

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Re: Nannies Don't Want to Work for Black Families
« Reply #11 on: December 28, 2006, 11:09:33 AM »
I didn't realise that racism was so rampant amongst the nanny set.  I had always planned on having some type of help with my kids because I'll have no family around (if I stay in the US) and will prolly have to work late some of the time.  Then again, their dad will have more flexible hours.

The racism is sad, but not surprising to me.

I think it would be good if mothers in different cities would begin to compile lists of nannies and agencies willing to work in their area, to avoid having to be bothered with racist ones during the search for help.  I know there's a group called "Mocha Moms," that sponsors play dates and such for Black kids, I wonder if they have a "nanny database?"

Is that a national group?

Re: Nannies Don't Want to Work for Black Families
« Reply #12 on: December 28, 2006, 11:14:44 AM »

pikey

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Re: Nannies Don't Want to Work for Black Families
« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2006, 11:25:40 AM »
If they're stay at home moms, wouldn't they be less likely to have need of a nanny database?

Good point.

Are their any organisations for black working moms.  I couldn't see myself staying home too long (if ever).

Re: Nannies Don't Want to Work for Black Families
« Reply #14 on: December 28, 2006, 11:35:18 AM »
If they're stay at home moms, wouldn't they be less likely to have need of a nanny database?

Yeah, but I was reading some article about them (I think it was in Essence) a while back and some of them - at least in this area - have part time jobs, work at home, etc. so they still might use nannies or babysitters.

I don't know of any large organizations for working mothers...

pikey

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Re: Nannies Don't Want to Work for Black Families
« Reply #15 on: December 28, 2006, 11:36:14 AM »
If they're stay at home moms, wouldn't they be less likely to have need of a nanny database?

Yeah, but I was reading some article about them (I think it was in Essence) a while back and some of them - at least in this area - have part time jobs, work at home, etc. so they still might use nannies or babysitters.

I don't know of any large organizations for working mothers...

How about black working women in general.  I know I could prolly find it myself, but I'm lazy.  :)

Re: Nannies Don't Want to Work for Black Families
« Reply #16 on: December 29, 2006, 03:03:02 AM »
if this law school thing doesn't work out i'll nanny your kids... for $100K a year  :D

naturallybeyoutiful

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Re: Nannies Don't Want to Work for Black Families
« Reply #17 on: December 29, 2006, 09:14:29 AM »
 >:(And people think racism does not exist...

BrerAnansi

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Re: Nannies Don't Want to Work for Black Families
« Reply #18 on: December 29, 2006, 11:01:55 AM »
Eric Boone and the author of the article are on NPR right now and the author is putting it down to resentment both on the part of African-American/Caribbean nannies and the white nannies.  It seems that for both groups of nannies going to work for black family creates some feelings of personal failure.  Why?  If the assumption is that channels to success are limited for black people, then these successful black families “shame” both black and white nannies.  The Caribbean/African-American nannies would think we're from the same background (more or less) and yet this family has made good and progressed up the economic ladder and here I am working for $25,000 a year (often with a family of their own to support) and there is some shame associated with that.  The shame (to a greater extent of course because the “starting lines” are different for blacks and whites)) applies as well to the white nannies.  The author made an analogy telling Mr. Boone that if he lost his job and had to wait tables for a living (that is his class status was reset) that he'd probably prefer to wait on complete strangers than his former co-workers.  So what I got from it was the idea that the social construct of what black people are (or I should say are supposed to be) in America exacerbates the issues of class that already exist in the relationship between nanny and employer.

As inflammatory as some of the statements seemed, it turns out that the racial slurs in the piece were sanitized or paraphrased per the Times's policies.  Mr. Boone also shared that Caribbean nannies were especially reluctant to work for black families because they had negative perceptions of African-Americans.  Some of it too seemed to do with some idea of “prestige” among the nannies.  Although they themselves often live in less than savory neighborhoods, they will refuse to work in certain neighborhoods because it’s “below” them.  For example they may refuse to work in Harlem or the Southside even though there are very upscale portions in both areas.     

Re: Nannies Don't Want to Work for Black Families
« Reply #19 on: December 29, 2006, 11:39:41 AM »
As inflammatory as some of the statements seemed, it turns out that the racial slurs in the piece were sanitized or paraphrased per the Times's policies.  Mr. Boone also shared that Caribbean nannies were especially reluctant to work for black families because they had negative perceptions of African-Americans. Some of it too seemed to do with some idea of “prestige” among the nannies.  Although they themselves often live in less than savory neighborhoods, they will refuse to work in certain neighborhoods because it’s “below” them.  For example they may refuse to work in Harlem or the Southside even though there are very upscale portions in both areas.     


Most of the blded doesn't surprise me.  Black Caribbeans often beleive the stereotypes that filter out about blk Americans (see Mary Waters).

 ::)

I don't even know how else to respond to that bullskit.