Law School Discussion

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Poll

Good idea to start law school with the goal of transferring to a better school?

Yes
 2 (18.2%)
No
 9 (81.8%)

Total Members Voted: 5

Author Topic: Transferring after L1  (Read 2007 times)

burghblast

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Transferring after L1
« on: September 04, 2004, 11:05:19 AM »
I'm a 26 year old computer engineer who will be applying to law schools next month for admission in Fall 2005.  I'm taking the October LSAT, and I expect my score to be in the low-to-mid 170s.  My undergrad GPA at Penn State was only 2.86.  I've been crunching the numbers, and even with the most optimistic assessment of how any of the top adcoms would weight my major, work experience, LSAT, LOR's, and personal statement, it really looks like my undergrad performance will preclude me from getting into any of the top schools.  I hadn't planned on going to Yale or Harvard, but someplace in the top 15 would have been nice.  It does look like I should be able to get into a couple schools in the top 30 though.  So my question is, would it be possible for me to transfer from a top 30 school to a top 15 after my first year, assuming I aced all my classes, had solid extracurricular activities, etc?  How do transfers work?  Will any of the top schools allow you to transfer in after your first year at a lesser school?

dgatl

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Re: Transferring after L1
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2004, 12:29:55 PM »
your transfer will be entirely dependent on your first year grades and LOR's.  @#!* the student organizations and practically everything else.  be the #1 or #2 person in your class and get close with a professor who will be able to vouch for you, not just write a lame LOR about how you did in his class

jacy85

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Re: Transferring after L1
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2004, 12:45:20 PM »
"assuming I ace all my classes"  Wow...that's a HUGE, and somewhat unrealistic, assumption.  Most schools will let you transfer, but I'd imagine that they give you the run around trying to get forms and recs and things.  They try to retain as many students as possible.

Also, there are hundreds of people in your situation, if not more, looking to transfer up (or are at least considering it a possibility).

What I'm getting at here is transfering isn't as easy as most people seem to think it is.  There are countless numbers of posts here with people flippantly saying "oh, I'll go anywhere I can get into and then transfer.  No biggie."  If you can't see yourself being happy at whatever school you choose to go to for all 3 years, don't go.  Sure, transfering is a possibility. But seeing how 4.0 students who breezed through college struggle in law school, asking *now* whether you should transfer is just silly.  Asking next year after first semester grades are in is probably a better idea.

I'm a 26 year old computer engineer who will be applying to law schools next month for admission in Fall 2005.  I'm taking the October LSAT, and I expect my score to be in the low-to-mid 170s.  My undergrad GPA at Penn State was only 2.86.  I've been crunching the numbers, and even with the most optimistic assessment of how any of the top adcoms would weight my major, work experience, LSAT, LOR's, and personal statement, it really looks like my undergrad performance will preclude me from getting into any of the top schools.  I hadn't planned on going to Yale or Harvard, but someplace in the top 15 would have been nice.  It does look like I should be able to get into a couple schools in the top 30 though.  So my question is, would it be possible for me to transfer from a top 30 school to a top 15 after my first year, assuming I aced all my classes, had solid extracurricular activities, etc?  How do transfers work?  Will any of the top schools allow you to transfer in after your first year at a lesser school?

melissamw

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Re: Transferring after L1
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2004, 12:51:32 PM »
I don't think that this poster is assuming he will automatically be able to tranfer.  I think he is admitting he messed up in UG, wants to take LS seriously, and is curious about the process of transferring.  You seem to be realistic about your admission chances, and accept that.  Transferring is difficultm but people do it every year, so it's not impossible!  ATLbong gave some good pointers!

burghblast

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Re: Transferring after L1
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2004, 12:53:36 PM »
I'd rather ask whether it's even possible now than wait until next year and find out that even if I am in the top 5% of my class it can't be done.  My question wasn't about the likelihood of the best-case L1 academic performance happening.  The question was, if it does happen - What's the likelihood of being able to transfer?  And how does the process work?

thinknpositive

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Re: Transferring after L1
« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2004, 12:55:20 PM »
I don't think that this poster is assuming he will automatically be able to tranfer.  I think he is admitting he messed up in UG, wants to take LS seriously, and is curious about the process of transferring.  You seem to be realistic about your admission chances, and accept that.  Transferring is difficultm but people do it every year, so it's not impossible!  ATLbong gave some good pointers!

you are missing Jacy's main point:

"If you can't see yourself being happy at whatever school you choose to go to for all 3 years, don't go. "

It's too early in the game to even consider transferring. Of course it is possible.  Of course people do it every year.  But you should NEVER go to a school thinking that you can transfer.


thinknpositive

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Re: Transferring after L1
« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2004, 12:57:23 PM »
I'd rather ask whether it's even possible now than wait until next year and find out that even if I am in the top 5% of my class it can't be done.  My question wasn't about the likelihood of the best-case L1 academic performance happening.  The question was, if it does happen - What's the likelihood of being able to transfer?  And how does the process work?

go the schools' website that you are interested in and look it up.

each school is different.

some schools (yale) won't even consider you unless you would have been competitive in the normal applicant pool

burghblast

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Re: Transferring after L1
« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2004, 12:58:25 PM »
Interesting feedback... Anyone else think it's a bad idea to start law school with the goal of upgrading to a better school before graduation?  I appreciate everyone's insight.

londongirl

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Re: Transferring after L1
« Reply #8 on: September 04, 2004, 04:22:05 PM »
The answer is not to go to a school from which you'd be unhappy to graduate, in case you can't transfer. But I don't think it's bad to consider transferring already. You can be happy somewhere but have your sights set higher. If you know before starting that you want to tranfer you'll work hard to fulfil that aim, and an aim is a good thing to have before you start. But be prepared for the eventuality that you will not tranfer. Go with your eyes wide open.

thinknpositive

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Re: Transferring after L1
« Reply #9 on: September 04, 2004, 04:28:23 PM »
The answer is not to go to a school from which you'd be unhappy to graduate, in case you can't transfer. But I don't think it's bad to consider transferring already. You can be happy somewhere but have your sights set higher. If you know before starting that you want to tranfer you'll work hard to fulfil that aim, and an aim is a good thing to have before you start. But be prepared for the eventuality that you will not tranfer. Go with your eyes wide open.

you shouldn't try and do well with the specific goal in mind of transferring.  you are setting yourself up for disappointment.  you should try and do well so that you are afforded every available option.