Law School Discussion

What does "economically disadvantaged household mean?"

What does "economically disadvantaged household mean?"
« on: December 19, 2006, 10:46:02 AM »
I'm interested in hearing others feelings on this topic...Thanks

Sweetpri

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Re: What does "economically disadvantaged household mean?"
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2006, 02:20:41 PM »
It means that you were poor.  Your family didn't do what most middle class families do - go out to restaurants (or even McDonalds), buy new clothes, get tons of Christmas & birthday presents.  If you had to start working when you were old enough to get a job, had to work through college, and lived in a not-so-nice neighborhood growing up I would say that's economically disadvantaged too.

jarhead

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Re: What does "economically disadvantaged household mean?"
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2007, 03:20:32 PM »
po'

EEtoJD

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Re: What does "economically disadvantaged household mean?"
« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2007, 01:38:26 AM »
You ate gubmint cheese.

Towelie

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Re: What does "economically disadvantaged household mean?"
« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2007, 06:47:49 PM »
It means that you were poor.  Your family didn't do what most middle class families do - go out to restaurants (or even McDonalds), buy new clothes, get tons of Christmas & birthday presents.  If you had to start working when you were old enough to get a job, had to work through college, and lived in a not-so-nice neighborhood growing up I would say that's economically disadvantaged too.

Agreed - especially to the last part (which is like my life story). I applied with fee waivers and had a very "economically disadvantaged" oriented P.S. I started working near full-time at 16, worked through college, lived in a crime-infested neighborhood where I couldn't even get pizza delivered (too many delivery boys had been shot), and this qualified me, I thought, as economically disadvantaged. The law schools seemed to agree, at least by granting me fee waivers.

rugercaptain

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Re: What does "economically disadvantaged household mean?"
« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2007, 09:25:33 AM »
You ate gubmint cheese.

Wow.  I'd forgotten about "gubmint cheese."  Dined on some while in college in the early '80's--not bad stuff.  Mmmmmm, grilled gubmint cheese sammiches... ;D  

rugercaptain

Tetris

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Re: What does "economically disadvantaged household mean?"
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2007, 02:03:19 PM »
I'd consider myself from an economically disadvantaged household... here are my circumstances...

Parents were 19 and 21 when born, no college degrees or good jobs. 

Lived in an basement, apartment, then a trailer which I lived in for 16 years.  The trailer was shoddy and had peeling wall paper and flooring.

My parents were divorced when I was 5 and my dad was disabled so he only had to pay $50/ month for both my sister and I.

My mom went to college while we were children and we lived on student loans, food stamps, and her part time jobs (like fast food).

Untill I was a teenager, she was either single or had a dead-beat boyfriend.

I was always embarassed by my clothes and hair cuts and the fact that we received food stamps and occassionaly food from the food pantry.

I got my first job when I was 17 and have worked every since.  She couldnt and can't afford to help me out financially aside from paying my car insurance so I have gone into debt to pay for college and had to work between 20 and 30 hours a week while going to school full time to support myself and my girlfriend who's mom flaked out and left her with me when she was 17 and finishing high school still.

So yeah.  That's what I consider economically disadvantaged.  I'm sure some have it worse and I think people have it slightly better could still consider themselves disadvantaged.  The funny thing is I wouldn't want to grow up or live any other way than economically da'd.  It built my character, work ethic, and dispelled the notion that people need an absurd amount of money (big houses, fancy cars, etc.).   

stjobs

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Re: What does "economically disadvantaged household mean?"
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2007, 02:07:57 PM »
Quote
Your family didn't do what most middle class families do - go out to restaurants (or even McDonalds)

I even see homeless people -buying- food at McDonald's, though...

I think the definition of 'economically disadvantaged' is difficult to hash out but pretty clear in practice, although like most things, interpretations vary.

Re: What does "economically disadvantaged household mean?"
« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2007, 09:44:25 PM »
Economically disadvantage....

You went to a low quality inner city or rural public school, Mommy and Daddy have no money to help with anything let alone college, your cultural capital originates from the lower or working class, you were were basically disadvantaged by lack of money to afford anything intellectually enriching and you basically were confined to one city/town your entire life because you never had the money to visit anywhere else. Basically, you have many more hurdles to overcome on your way to the top, you started out behind most "typical" middle class or above law students.

Re: What does "economically disadvantaged household mean?"
« Reply #9 on: February 14, 2007, 11:14:11 PM »
It means that you were poor.  Your family didn't do what most middle class families do - go out to restaurants (or even McDonalds), buy new clothes, get tons of Christmas & birthday presents.  If you had to start working when you were old enough to get a job, had to work through college, and lived in a not-so-nice neighborhood growing up I would say that's economically disadvantaged too.

Agreed - especially to the last part (which is like my life story). I applied with fee waivers and had a very "economically disadvantaged" oriented P.S. I started working near full-time at 16, worked through college, lived in a crime-infested neighborhood where I couldn't even get pizza delivered (too many delivery boys had been shot), and this qualified me, I thought, as economically disadvantaged. The law schools seemed to agree, at least by granting me fee waivers.

Economically disadvantage....

if you were given free access to public transportation from elementary school-high school, you got free lunch at school and some assholes had the nerve to criticize you for that, you never purchased a suit until you got to law school, assholes from long island and staten island look down you (which is actually more amusing than insulting), you lived in a neighborhood where you had to put money in your shoe b/c of muggings and once those assholes knew about that you had to then hide your money underneath the cushion of your shoe, medical insurance companies deliberately refused to pay for your medical bills because they're certain that you're either too uneducated or poor to get legal representation, it took the ambulance 1-2 hours to get to your neighborhood at night because the paramedics were afraid of getting mugged (at least we had that problem during the 80's), you're very inclined to resort to violence the moment anyone disrespects you because you have absolutely nothing but your dignity and self-respect and must defend it at all costs,  and your parents left the ghetto the second it was economically feasible. 

However, when you get to law school and you hear some of the ignorantass comments that some privileged kids make, you start to appreciate your background a lot more  :D