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Author Topic: Practicing patent law/IP as a non-US citizen  (Read 661 times)

prefuse73

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Practicing patent law/IP as a non-US citizen
« on: September 02, 2004, 08:10:42 PM »
Hi
I'm a Canadian student studying at Cornell. I'm very interested in doing IP law. However, I heard from someone that you need to have US Citizenship in order to take the Patent Bar. Is this true? If it is, is it not possible for foreign citizens like me to practice patent law or IP? What exactly is the distinction between IP law and patent law anyway?

Also, my major(computer science at college of Engineering) at my school is not accredited by ABET. Does this mean I won't be able to take Patent Law(if US Citizenship doesn't matter)?

Thanks

nonobvious

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Re: Practicing patent law/IP as a non-US citizen
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2004, 10:43:42 PM »
Check here: http://www.patents.com/opportun.htm

If the answer's not right on the site, then find the link to the USPTO which should list requirements.
"Flying is simple. You just throw yourself at the ground and miss."

dgatl

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Re: Practicing patent law/IP as a non-US citizen
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2004, 12:38:39 AM »
10.6 Registration of attorneys and agents.

(a) Attorneys. Any citizen of the United States who is an attorney and who fulfills the requirements of this part may be registered as a patent attorney to practice before the Office. When appropriate, any alien who is an attorney, who lawfully resides in the United States, and who fulfills the requirements of this part may be registered as a patent attorney to practice before the Office, provided: Registration is not inconsistent with the terms upon which the alien was admitted to, and resides in, the United States and further provided: The alien may remain registered only (1) if the alien continues to lawfully reside in the United States and registration does not become inconsistent with the terms upon which the alien continues to lawfully reside in the United States, or (2) if the alien ceases to reside in the United States, the alien is qualified to be registered under paragraph (c) of this section. See also 10.9(b).

wolfsvagon

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Re: Practicing patent law/IP as a non-US citizen
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2005, 09:09:39 AM »
There is a reciprocating agreement between US and Canada.  A Canadian national may sit through a Pat Bar exam in the US and vice versa.  It is my understanding that Canada is the only country that US allows for their nationals to sit through a Pat Exam.  Of course with the assumptions that other qualifications that are stipulated by the USPTO are met, but I see that you have already satisfied the Science/Engineering degree requirement, so I don't see any problems with you being admitted to the exam, unless of course you have some criminal history that the Board may consider significant.