Law School Discussion

Poll

If I can take a quarter off of school to study for the LSAT and still graduate on time, would it be wise to do so?

Yes
30 (45.5%)
No
36 (54.5%)

Total Members Voted: 63

"Ludicrous" to take a quarter off of school to study for the LSAT?

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Re: "Ludicrous" to take a quarter off of school to study for the LSAT?
« Reply #20 on: December 09, 2006, 10:15:26 PM »
LUDA!

windycindy

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Re: "Ludicrous" to take a quarter off of school to study for the LSAT?
« Reply #21 on: December 09, 2006, 10:58:29 PM »
I didn't actually read the thread but WTF??!!??!! Ludicrous is taking the LSAT!!!!! No way! That's whack. I wonder what he'll score?

I can't wait to find out about how he does. I wonder what his target shools are.

w.c.

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Re: "Ludicrous" to take a quarter off of school to study for the LSAT?
« Reply #22 on: December 09, 2006, 11:19:14 PM »
I didn't actually read the thread but WTF??!!??!! Ludicrous is taking the LSAT!!!!! No way! That's whack. I wonder what he'll score?

I can't wait to find out about how he does. I wonder what his target shools are.

w.c.

Luda would do the A-town stomp all the way to Yale and tell the adcomms to "step back motherfuckers, you don't know me like that."

This would instantly get him a full ride at the entire T14.

Re: "Ludicrous" to take a quarter off of school to study for the LSAT?
« Reply #23 on: December 10, 2006, 01:02:53 AM »
Exactly how many hours do you think you're going to study for this thing?  It's a five-part multiple choice test.  The vast majority of test-takers study while working or going to school full time.  If you're doing more than 40 hours a week in school work and job/sports/volunteering, just take one class fewer and use those hours for LSAT.    There's no way you'll be able to fill that much time with LSAT studying and it's not really a test you can or should put everything else on hold for.  If you can find a couple 2-hour blocks a week for practice tests and 30-60 minutes every couple days for studying you're likely to do as well as you can do.

zephyr

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Re: "Ludicrous" to take a quarter off of school to study for the LSAT?
« Reply #24 on: December 10, 2006, 07:33:17 AM »
I didn't "take off" any time, but it just worked out that I finished classes in April and had all of May to study. I wouldn't take time off during the school year b/c you'll have to account for this when you apply. I don't think that adcoms will be too fond of the idea that you spent 10 weeks learning strategies to beat the LSAT while the rest of your peer applicants were able to balance the workload with jobs, classes, etc.

Anyway, I didn't find the whole month of May to be that beneficial. I took a Kaplan course, studied my ass off, and got nerves on test day. I know part of my anxiety stemmed from the fact that I had spent the past 6 weeks pretty much doing only LSAT stuff, only to screw up on a logic game. This was also before the new ABA policy, when the LSAT was a one-shot deal. I turned out with a disappointing score for me, and decided to retake.

By the time I started prepping for the Sept. exam, I had started a full-time internship and needed to balance work with studying. Fortunately I had a one-hour train ride to get to work, so I took advantage of it. I was disciplined and allowed myself to bring only a prep test to go over or the Powerscore Logic Games Bible. I spent my lunch breaks doing a few problems too.

Ok...not sure where I'm going with all this, but that was my experience. I did far better in September, partly b/c of the LRB and partly b/c I was more relaxed. I guess my point is that you can only study so much, and you should be perfectly able to balance it with a normal life. I only allowed myself to go out Saturday nights, so I was able to study Friday night and not be hungover on Saturday so I could study then too. Is it possible to reduce your courseload or step back from some ECs? It all comes down to self-discipline.

ptown

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Re: "Ludicrous" to take a quarter off of school to study for the LSAT?
« Reply #25 on: December 10, 2006, 07:39:13 AM »
people wanting to do things like this just puts emphasis on how the LSAT is a poor predictor of intelligence.  Some kid can take 3 months to do nothing but study, and get a good score, then appear to be smarter than the single mom that studies through the night, or the undergrad that works 30 hrs per week and studies on lunch breaks.  It just shows that the LSAT, and thus law school admissions, is too heavily influence by the availability of money, which buys time (and prepcourses).  

I dont know how you could study that much anyway, to me it just sounds like a half-baked excuse to do nothing on daddy's dollar for a few months.

Anyone who does this deserves an atomic wedgie.


Re: "Ludicrous" to take a quarter off of school to study for the LSAT?
« Reply #26 on: December 10, 2006, 08:02:44 AM »
Exactly how many hours do you think you're going to study for this thing?  It's a five-part multiple choice test.  The vast majority of test-takers study while working or going to school full time.  If you're doing more than 40 hours a week in school work and job/sports/volunteering, just take one class fewer and use those hours for LSAT.    There's no way you'll be able to fill that much time with LSAT studying and it's not really a test you can or should put everything else on hold for.  If you can find a couple 2-hour blocks a week for practice tests and 30-60 minutes every couple days for studying you're likely to do as well as you can do.

I think spreading it out in smaller blocks of time works better than trying the full-time study approach. I had no choice but to do the latter for a month and even in that time period I got really burned out. I can't imagine doing it for a full quarter, nor do I think this is a wise idea.

windycindy

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Re: "Ludicrous" to take a quarter off of school to study for the LSAT?
« Reply #27 on: December 10, 2006, 10:26:23 AM »
people wanting to do things like this just puts emphasis on how the LSAT is a poor predictor of intelligence.  Some kid can take 3 months to do nothing but study, and get a good score, then appear to be smarter than the single mom that studies through the night, or the undergrad that works 30 hrs per week and studies on lunch breaks.  It just shows that the LSAT, and thus law school admissions, is too heavily influence by the availability of money, which buys time (and prepcourses).  

I dont know how you could study that much anyway, to me it just sounds like a half-baked excuse to do nothing on daddy's dollar for a few months.

Anyone who does this deserves an atomic wedgie.



Ptown, I love ya brother. But I just don't buy your theory on money equaling high lsat scores.

BTW, how did you do yesterday? I was the guy that walked out.

w.c.

Re: "Ludicrous" to take a quarter off of school to study for the LSAT?
« Reply #28 on: December 10, 2006, 10:37:53 AM »
people wanting to do things like this just puts emphasis on how the LSAT is a poor predictor of intelligence.  Some kid can take 3 months to do nothing but study, and get a good score, then appear to be smarter than the single mom that studies through the night, or the undergrad that works 30 hrs per week and studies on lunch breaks.  It just shows that the LSAT, and thus law school admissions, is too heavily influence by the availability of money, which buys time (and prepcourses). 

I dont know how you could study that much anyway, to me it just sounds like a half-baked excuse to do nothing on daddy's dollar for a few months.

Anyone who does this deserves an atomic wedgie.



Ptown, I love ya brother. But I just don't buy your theory on money equaling high lsat scores.

BTW, how did you do yesterday? I was the guy that walked out.

w.c.

I think money does play a role. For instance, a single mother who makes a meager salary and has to scrape together money to find just a few hours a week to study is probably going to have troubles doing as well as a person who takes a full quarter off to study, including taking a prep course.

I do think it is somewhat less of a problem than at the UG level, but at least with UG, you can get around it by starting at a junior college, doing well, and transferring in when schools no longer require SAT for admissions.

windycindy

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Re: "Ludicrous" to take a quarter off of school to study for the LSAT?
« Reply #29 on: December 10, 2006, 11:25:33 AM »
people wanting to do things like this just puts emphasis on how the LSAT is a poor predictor of intelligence.  Some kid can take 3 months to do nothing but study, and get a good score, then appear to be smarter than the single mom that studies through the night, or the undergrad that works 30 hrs per week and studies on lunch breaks.  It just shows that the LSAT, and thus law school admissions, is too heavily influence by the availability of money, which buys time (and prepcourses). 

I dont know how you could study that much anyway, to me it just sounds like a half-baked excuse to do nothing on daddy's dollar for a few months.

Anyone who does this deserves an atomic wedgie.



Ptown, I love ya brother. But I just don't buy your theory on money equaling high lsat scores.

BTW, how did you do yesterday? I was the guy that walked out.

w.c.

I think money does play a role. For instance, a single mother who makes a meager salary and has to scrape together money to find just a few hours a week to study is probably going to have troubles doing as well as a person who takes a full quarter off to study, including taking a prep course.

I do think it is somewhat less of a problem than at the UG level, but at least with UG, you can get around it by starting at a junior college, doing well, and transferring in when schools no longer require SAT for admissions.

And I agree with that queencruella. Certainly there are factors that can hurt your ability to prep. But that doesn't mean you can simply buy a good score. Lack of money (having to work and not being able to buy the best prep test materials certainly is a disadvantage, but it's a disadvantage that more than a few [me included] have to deal with. And I've got no complaints. But if you think you can just drop big bucks and excel...well, it just doesn't happen that way. There are no magic pills.