Law School Discussion

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« on: December 03, 2006, 08:55:31 AM »
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Re: cancel or risk it
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2006, 08:59:30 AM »
yes, I would cancel it in this case. It would look bad if your score went down.

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Re: cancel or risk it
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2006, 09:08:22 AM »
Well, simply said, schools have different strategies to this, summed up quickly (174 out of 198 schools)

Quote
96 law schools now take the higher LSAT. At these schools, life is easy; if you have any reason to think your LSAT score is unrepresentative, retake. 

42 law schools take the higher with a good explanation.  If you're applying to these schools, retake if you know what went wrong the first time, and particularly if that problem was beyond your control. 

28 schools say "average unless a good explanation;" they put a greater burden on you.  Their inclination is to average, whereas the schools in the category above are inclined to take the higher. 

Only 6 schools will continue to average in all cases.  You might think that life will remain the same as it was at these schools, but I predict otherwise.

I'm not going to quote the entire list, but you will it on http://www.deloggio.com/newweb/news.htm
I'd suggest searching for the schools you are applying to, and find out whether you risk much or nothing by getting the new result.

cavalierchamp

Re: cancel or risk it
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2006, 09:17:01 AM »
Have you been able to predict low scores on your practice tests?  Because for me, some of the tests I felt the most insecure about I ended up scoring the best on.  Not even necessarily because of old, forgiving scales.

I don't feel like I nailed this test, but I resolved that unless I was sure I bombed it, I would not cancel.  I am not sure I bombed it.  So, I will not cancel.  For me, not knowing what I got would be worse than getting a slightly lower score than my first test.

Hope that helps.

Bouzie1982

Re: cancel or risk it
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2006, 09:20:17 AM »
Go for it.  If you weren't happy with your sept score (im assuming this since you retook) this was your one chance this cycle to improve upon it.  Also, most will take the highest even if you dropped --you don't have much to lose and everything to gain by even a small increase in your score.


Have confidence ;)  and if you don't have that--have balls ;)

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Re: cancel or risk it
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2006, 09:22:37 AM »
Well, most schools will allow you to retake February as well, just not as your only test.

dlrow

Writing section
« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2006, 09:25:11 AM »
I'm concerned about the writing section.  I may have Biffed on the Writing Section and I think I did moderately well on the MC. Should I cancel? Both schools i'm able to consider will take the higher score on the MC. What writing section does the LSAC send to the applied schools when one score is greater?

cavalierchamp

Re: cancel or risk it
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2006, 09:30:05 AM »
The writing section is not scored, and is not high on the priority list for adcomms, IMO.

JoeGibbsRedskins

Re: cancel or risk it
« Reply #8 on: December 03, 2006, 09:34:47 AM »
cancel, more people  i have talked to have been more depressed about not doing the cancel than doing the cancel.


It is almost like these people who know they did below average and see the post answers on here, are living in the moment so much they do not see the bigger picture. Is getting the LSAT over with to go drink with your friends more important than not having a low LSAT score on your record?


Lets say you take the test in Feb and score high, but do not get into the school you want because its a little too late. Yeah it might suck now. But in the summer when you start to apply you are at the advantage . Getting a low score never puts you at an advantage.