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Just looked at answer sheet & writing sample 6 months later

Just looked at answer sheet & writing sample 6 months later
« on: December 02, 2006, 11:54:12 PM »
It was pretty eerie. It's been long enough that looking over it is almost a new experience. Oh well, at least I know I didn't totally blow the essay. Anyone else looked at their file lately?

Re: Just looked at answer sheet & writing sample 6 months later
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2006, 12:07:38 AM »
Mine's illegible. Apparently you weren't supposed to erase. Who knew?

Honestly if I were looking at my file, I'd take one look at that unreadable pdf file and reject me. Thank goodness I'm not reviewing my own application.

Re: Just looked at answer sheet & writing sample 6 months later
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2006, 01:41:44 AM »
Yeah, mine doesn't look great with all the crossed out crap and exhausted hand writing.

I wonder though...according to a recent LSAC survey, a lot of schools supposedly do use the writing sample in their decisions. I wonder how much it matters.

austin

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Re: Just looked at answer sheet & writing sample 6 months later
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2006, 05:38:23 AM »
I'm hoping that my master penmanship will sway the adcomms.
 :P

Denny Crane

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Re: Just looked at answer sheet & writing sample 6 months later
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2006, 10:25:34 AM »
When I took the LSAT again, I was much more relaxed about the essay part and injected some snarky remarks (none that were risque or offensive, but ones that made it clear I was trying to have some fun with the essay).  So far it doesn't seem as if that approach has hurt me in any way, and I received a much higher LSAT score the second time around.  Maybe the essay reflected my overall approach to the test the second time.  Either way, the essay portion probably has very little sway with adcomms over how they view your application.  I've had adcomms from 2 or 3 top schools admit that they rarely look at the LSAT essay, and do so only in extreme circumstances when they're comparing two applicants who are almost identical in every other way (numbers, soft factors, LORs, etc).