Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Poll

Why did Sarah Palin resign?

Personal scandal
 5 (17.2%)
Probable indictment
 7 (24.1%)
Just plain craziness
 3 (10.3%)
Looooong lead up to 2012
 4 (13.8%)
Something else
 2 (6.9%)
Some combination of the above
 8 (27.6%)

Total Members Voted: 29

Author Topic: The Thread on Politics  (Read 427430 times)

A.

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #80 on: March 04, 2007, 10:58:33 PM »
::still waiting for bertrande to return from lunch::

Have you guys read the Bybee/Yoo Torture Memo before?  It's quite fascinating.

Tony Montana

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #81 on: March 05, 2007, 11:49:13 AM »

"::still waiting for bertrande to return from lunch::"

Might be out of gas...

"Have you guys read the Bybee/Yoo Torture Memo before?  It's quite fascinating."

I haven't.  Do u have a link?
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Tony Montana

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #83 on: March 05, 2007, 02:33:37 PM »
A marked-up version: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/nation/documents/dojinterrogationmemo20020801.pdf

An easier-to-read version: http://www.humanrightsfirst.org/us_law/etn/gonzales/memos_dir/memo_20020801_JD_%20Gonz_.pdf

Man… talk about justification... I like the presidential "Commander-in-Chief powers " trump card the most...
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A.

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #84 on: March 05, 2007, 04:38:57 PM »
The necessity and self-defense parts probably bother me most.  Of course, it's a lawyer's job to figure out how best to use the rules to favor his client, and I can't say that I would have advised differently...but the implications are troubling.

Tony Montana

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #85 on: March 05, 2007, 07:34:58 PM »
I know what you mean...  And, yes, I think they did the best they could considering the lack of binding authority...
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Tony Montana

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #86 on: March 06, 2007, 08:35:12 PM »
Well, I've made a good faith effort to understand what this post is getting at and I've drawn a blank. If you're saying "'no, in fact the supply of doctors is not determined by the 'free market', then we agree."

It's simple as this: If you define "free market" in a strict/narrow sense, then you will have a hard time finding examples of free markets--as there are barriers to entry and some controls in industries.  I really think you are getting unnecessarily hung-up on strict definitions here…       

"It is interesting, then, that you would have fuzzy objections to a monopsony that would counteract the wage premium that this monopolistic supply of physicians extracts from the health care system."

You are conflating the barriers to entry for MDs with creating a monopsony. You conflate these as if the medical profession is deliberately controlling supply, when the requirements (for practicing medicine) are there to guarantee that people entering the medical field are suitably qualified.  Have you stop to think that maybe physicians should be paid a premium for their services in order to maintain quality?  After all, we are talking about peoples health here.  Why should a physician's wages be reduced by UHC price controls?  Hell, if you want to control MDs wages, why not control the wages of lawyers next--so that everyone can "afford it?"  ...Do that and watch quality go down the drain...

Don't get me wrong I am all for helping people get health care.  But there is a difference between necessary and unnecessary controls.  What's so "fuzzy" about that?
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Tony Montana

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #87 on: March 06, 2007, 09:44:47 PM »
tangent #1: a common complaint of doctors is that medical decisions are increasingly out of their control and in the hands of insurance or other companies.

also, the Feb 12th issue of Time has a short article about doctors dropping out of the profession...

"So here is the cause of your doctor's pain in 2007.  Behind him or her is a 15-year trend of diminishing fees that shows no signs of abating.  Graduating med students aren't blind; they see established physicians with busy practices dropping out.  Looking ahead they see more headaches--more controls and regulations, more scrutiny, more liability, less money."


Tangent #2: why aren't we having this discussion with different details: lawyers and monopoly?


Good points here! And, that is one reason why I mentioned lawyers in my last post.  I believe you get better doctors and lawyers—and better service--when prices remain competitive. Really, should we be looking at even more controls?
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Tony Montana

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #88 on: March 06, 2007, 09:58:26 PM »
Lol.  I saw it also...  But it was primarily a straw-man argument...


For example, he reworded my quality will suffer argument with "patient will die."  Another example, he takes my use of "free market" out of its context--original use was to make a point that the US health care market is a "freer" market than Canada.  I suspect he decided to use the literal definition as a red herring. 
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A.

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #89 on: March 09, 2007, 08:17:33 AM »
Gingrich had affair during Clinton probe

By BEN EVANS, Associated Press WriterThu Mar 8, 11:04 PM ET

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich acknowledged he was having an extramarital affair even as he led the charge against President Clinton over the Monica Lewinsky affair, he acknowledged in an interview with a conservative Christian group.

"The honest answer is yes," Gingrich, a potential 2008 Republican presidential candidate, said in an interview with Focus on the Family founder James Dobson to be aired Friday, according to a transcript provided to The Associated Press. "There are times that I have fallen short of my own standards. There's certainly times when I've fallen short of God's standards."

Gingrich argued in the interview, however, that he should not be viewed as a hypocrite for pursuing Clinton's infidelity.

"The president of the United States got in trouble for committing a felony in front of a sitting federal judge," the former Georgia congressman said of Clinton's 1998 House impeachment on perjury and obstruction of justice charges. "I drew a line in my mind that said, 'Even though I run the risk of being deeply embarrassed, and even though at a purely personal level I am not rendering judgment on another human being, as a leader of the government trying to uphold the rule of law, I have no choice except to move forward and say that you cannot accept ... perjury in your highest officials."

Widely considered a mastermind of the Republican revolution that swept Congress in the 1994 elections, Gingrich remains wildly popular among many conservatives. He has repeatedly placed near the top of Republican presidential polls recently, even though he has not formed a campaign.

Gingrich has said he is waiting to see how the Republican field shapes up before deciding in the fall whether to run.

Reports of extramarital affairs have dogged him for years as a result of two messy divorces, but he has refused to discuss them publicly.

Gingrich, who frequently campaigned on family values issues, divorced his second wife, Marianne, in 2000 after his attorneys acknowledged Gingrich's relationship with his current wife, Callista Bisek, a former congressional aide more than 20 years younger than he is.

His first marriage, to his former high school geometry teacher, Jackie Battley, ended in divorce in 1981. Although Gingrich has said he doesn't remember it, Battley has said Gingrich discussed divorce terms with her while she was recuperating in the hospital from cancer surgery.

Gingrich married Marianne months after the divorce.

"There were times when I was praying and when I felt I was doing things that were wrong. But I was still doing them," he said in the interview. "I look back on those as periods of weakness and periods that I'm ... not proud of."

Gingrich's congressional career ended in 1998 when he abruptly resigned from Congress after poor showings from Republicans in elections and after being reprimanded by the House ethics panel over charges that he used tax-exempt funding to advance his political goals.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070309/ap_on_go_co/gingrich_affair