Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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Poll

Why did Sarah Palin resign?

Personal scandal
 5 (17.2%)
Probable indictment
 7 (24.1%)
Just plain craziness
 3 (10.3%)
Looooong lead up to 2012
 4 (13.8%)
Something else
 2 (6.9%)
Some combination of the above
 8 (27.6%)

Total Members Voted: 29

Author Topic: The Thread on Politics  (Read 416291 times)

Tony Montana

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #70 on: March 04, 2007, 04:43:44 AM »


Also @ TheBadGuy - doctors make more because their operating costs are higher.  It's called malpractice insurance.  Not a big problem in universal health care system. 



Actually malpractice is not the only reason doctors get paid more.  Doctors operate within a free market systemů  Additionally, the U.S. has a higher cost of living than Canada--including the private cost of medical training. How will a UHCS deal with those factors?  By setting price limits?   


it's about time Big Pharm is made to foot their own bills.  Besides, given the frequency of their advertising during prime time, I get the feeling they're not exactly hurting.

Lol.  Any increase cost to "Big Pharma" will usually lead to increase prices to consumers.
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Tony Montana

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #71 on: March 04, 2007, 04:58:13 AM »
OK, I feel the same and I haven't seen any compelling counter-arguments.  Generally, there's a vague idea that the government is this corpulent monster and that universal health care would just be one more program that would be sucked into its gaping maw.
But to my mind, leaving this to the states is asking for trouble.  It may be just me, but universality is a pretty big part of my concept of universal health care.


The public school system as an archetype of a successful fed-state program?  :o
I wear a small, and I can be there in 20 mins.

lol.  I thought the "No virus left behind" comment would make clear my sarcasm.

I'd like to see how the MA and CA experiments turn out, but my feeling is that a federally initiated and controlled program would be most effective if it can somehow be given a measure of autonomy to free it from partisan mucking.

At least with states implementing health care programs to varying degrees, we have more opportunities to see what can work and what doesn't--as oppose to implementing one huge across the board plan.  Nevertheless, we shall see some state examples in the future...  As it stands some individual states are handling affairs--like budgets--a lot better than the federal government.  I don't see why some can't do the same for health care. 

For now, this health care subject will continue to be academic until the results are in...
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A.

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #72 on: March 04, 2007, 08:47:33 AM »
Lol...are you just this contrary, or do you like the role of devil's advocate?  Either way, you're a true Virgo's virgo.

Lol, I do relish the role of devil's advocate, but I'm not really playing it here.  Small government, devolution to states (who can better experiment and run things on a smaller scale), private sector...those are my things.  Lots of things that work in Europe won't work on the scale of the U.S.  Germany is slightly smaller than Montanta; France slightly smaller than Texas.  There's a reason things run by the national government seem to "work" better over there.  The U.S. is huge.  We have a federal system of government for a reason.

Agreed with Bad Guy on all points.

A.

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #73 on: March 04, 2007, 10:16:52 AM »
LOL, Alci.  Germany's smaller than Montana?

Not in terms of population, but in terms of physical size: https://cia.gov/cia//publications/factbook/fields/2023.html.  And size is a key determinant of ease of governance from a national level.

A.

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #74 on: March 04, 2007, 10:28:46 AM »
Lol.  Well obviously population matters.  That's why I said "key," not "sole" determinant.  Physical size imposes important constraints on population, industry, etc.  Germany's population is less than that of the four largest U.S. states combined (cf. https://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/print/gm.html with http://www.demographia.com/db-2000stater.htm).  The U.S. has too much variation and is quite simply too big for the national government to operate any sort of welfare program well.

One Step Ahead

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #75 on: March 04, 2007, 11:28:49 AM »
States rights!

A.

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #76 on: March 04, 2007, 11:37:26 AM »
I'll buy population variation as the key impetus to a federalist system.

But not the federal system as a solution to contemporary problems?

States rights!

Lol, I knew you were going to poke your head in to say something smart.  Yes, states rights.  Obviously, that can be taken to an extreme, but I don't believe we should throw the baby out with the bath water.

Tony Montana

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #77 on: March 04, 2007, 11:49:52 AM »
Doctors operate within a free market systemů 

Eh?  Explain

Eh, A free market is a market where the price of each item or service is arranged by the mutual consent of sellers and buyers.

Actual compensation to medical professionals in the United States is highly influenced by the discounted rates that publicly funded insurance programs, Medicaid and Medicare, and major health insurance companies are able to negotiate through the exercise of their market power.

This mix of public and private pay for healthcare services results in much higher compensation for medical professionals in the United States than in Canada...  
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A.

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #78 on: March 04, 2007, 11:52:45 AM »
Federalism is a fix for cultural problems, not for economic ones. Neither education financing nor health care financing are cultural issues and any discussion of federalism must be irrelevant to them.

I disagree.  States can play a useful and major role in domestic economic policy as well.  Sure, the national government should set standards, but the states are quite capable of implementing them.  I also disagree with the characterization of education and healthcare as being solely economic.  There are major cultural dimensions as well.  But whatever your characterization, federalism isn't irrelevant.

Tony Montana

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #79 on: March 04, 2007, 12:39:26 PM »
Doctors operate within a free market systemů 

Eh?  Explain

Eh, A free market is a market where the price of each item or service is arranged by the mutual consent of sellers and buyers.

Actual compensation to medical professionals in the United States is highly influenced by the discounted rates that publicly funded insurance programs, Medicaid and Medicare, and major health insurance companies are able to negotiate through the exercise of their market power.

This mix of public and private pay for healthcare services results in much higher compensation for medical professionals in the United States than in Canada...  

You don't think that physicians have and exercise monopolistic market power?



Directly no..  Although, I am aware that the regulation of the number and activities of MDs have a suppressive effect on the supply of health-care professionals.  Additionally, there are other barriers to entry (such as high admin cost and educational cost) that control the amount of MDs.  Does this mean that physicians are deliberately exercising monopolistic market power? 
Consuetudo pro lege servatur...Corruptisima re publica plurimae leges.