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Nine Years of Discussion
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Poll

Why did Sarah Palin resign?

Personal scandal
 5 (17.2%)
Probable indictment
 7 (24.1%)
Just plain craziness
 3 (10.3%)
Looooong lead up to 2012
 4 (13.8%)
Something else
 2 (6.9%)
Some combination of the above
 8 (27.6%)

Total Members Voted: 29

Author Topic: The Thread on Politics  (Read 408982 times)

A.

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2007, 11:06:56 PM »
Now that's the life: making speeches and raking in the money.

A.

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2007, 12:47:25 AM »
Group: Gore a Hypocrite Over Power Bill
Conservative Group Says Gore's Tenn. Mansion Uses Too Much Electricty, Calls Him a Hypocrite
By KRISTIN M. HALL Associated Press Writer
The Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Al Gore, a leading voice against global warming, is being criticized by a conservative group that claims his Nashville mansion uses too much electricity. A Gore spokeswoman said the former vice president invests in enough renewable energy to make up for the home's power consumption.

On Sunday, Gore's documentary film "An Inconvenient Truth," which chronicled his campaign against global warming, won an Academy Award.

The next day, the Tennessee Center for Policy Research issued a statement saying Gore was not doing enough to reduce his own electricity consumption. The group disputes that global warming is a serious problem.

"We wanted to see if he was living by his own recommendations and walking the walk," said think tank president Drew Johnson.

Utility records show the Gore family paid an average monthly electric bill of about $1,200 last year for its 10,000-square-foot home.

The Gores used about 191,000 kilowatt hours in 2006, according to bills reviewed by The Associated Press. The typical Nashville household uses about 15,600 kilowatt-hours per year.

The group said that Gore used nearly 221,000 kilowatt hours last year and that his average monthly electric bill was $1,359. Johnson said his group got its figures from Nashville Electric Service.

But company spokeswoman Laurie Parker said the utility never got a request from the policy center and never gave it any information.

Gore spokeswoman Kalee Kreider said: "Sometimes when people don't like the message, in this case that global warming is real, it's convenient to attack the messenger."

Kreider said Gore purchases enough energy from renewable energy sources such as solar, wind and methane gas to balance 100 percent of his electricity costs.

Gore, who owns homes in Carthage, Tenn., and in the Washington area, has said he leads a "carbon-neutral lifestyle." To balance out other carbon emissions, the Gores invest money in projects to reduce energy consumption, Kreider said.

http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory?id=2909396

A.

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #12 on: February 28, 2007, 12:49:58 AM »
The original article:

Al Gore’s Personal Energy Use Is His Own “Inconvenient Truth”

Gore’s home uses more than 20 times the national average

Last night, Al Gore’s global-warming documentary, An Inconvenient Truth, collected an Oscar for best documentary feature, but the Tennessee Center for Policy Research has found that Gore deserves a gold statue for hypocrisy.

Gore’s mansion, located in the posh Belle Meade area of Nashville, consumes more electricity every month than the average American household uses in an entire year, according to the Nashville Electric Service (NES).

In his documentary, the former Vice President calls on Americans to conserve energy by reducing electricity consumption at home.

The average household in America consumes 10,656 kilowatt-hours (kWh) per year, according to the Department of Energy. In 2006, Gore devoured nearly 221,000 kWh—more than 20 times the national average.

Last August alone, Gore burned through 22,619 kWh—guzzling more than twice the electricity in one month than an average American family uses in an entire year. As a result of his energy consumption, Gore’s average monthly electric bill topped $1,359.

Since the release of An Inconvenient Truth, Gore’s energy consumption has increased from an average of 16,200 kWh per month in 2005, to 18,400 kWh per month in 2006.

Gore’s extravagant energy use does not stop at his electric bill. Natural gas bills for Gore’s mansion and guest house averaged $1,080 per month last year.

“As the spokesman of choice for the global warming movement, Al Gore has to be willing to walk to walk, not just talk the talk, when it comes to home energy use,” said Tennessee Center for Policy Research President Drew Johnson.

In total, Gore paid nearly $30,000 in combined electricity and natural gas bills for his Nashville estate in 2006.

A.

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #13 on: February 28, 2007, 12:50:22 AM »
And I thought my power bill was high...

A.

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #14 on: February 28, 2007, 05:19:29 PM »
But thanks to a change put into the Patriot Act by Pennsylvania Republican Arlen Specter when it was reauthorized in late 2005, Gonzales and the White House gained the power to fill vacancies with interim appointees who can hold office for indefinite terms. Earlier this month, the Senate Judiciary Committee put forth legislation to restore limits for those terms (and thereby congressional vetting for long-term hires), but a full Senate vote on the bill was blocked by Republicans.

Wait, so what's the difference between an "indefinite term" and a permanent appointment?  Who besides the executive branch could end the "interim" appointment?

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2007, 05:56:38 PM »
Do you hear that, people? A knife in his heart. We should be ashamed of our base suspicions.


<------   :-[ :-[ :-[ :-[ :-[

Good.

A.

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2007, 09:01:48 PM »
But thanks to a change put into the Patriot Act by Pennsylvania Republican Arlen Specter when it was reauthorized in late 2005, Gonzales and the White House gained the power to fill vacancies with interim appointees who can hold office for indefinite terms. Earlier this month, the Senate Judiciary Committee put forth legislation to restore limits for those terms (and thereby congressional vetting for long-term hires), but a full Senate vote on the bill was blocked by Republicans.

Wait, so what's the difference between an "indefinite term" and a permanent appointment?  Who besides the executive branch could end the "interim" appointment?

The next president

Yeah probably.  Ah well.  Hopefully checks will be reinstated.

A.

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #17 on: March 01, 2007, 11:08:18 AM »
Lawyerly thinking often entails the usage of customary practice.

A.

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #18 on: March 01, 2007, 11:09:41 AM »
House GOP Pushes Floor Vote For Rep. Jefferson Appointment

By Lyndsey Layton
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, March 1, 2007; A04

House Republicans plan to force a floor vote on the appointment of Rep. William J. Jefferson (D-La.), who is the subject of a federal bribery investigation, to a seat on the Homeland Security Committee.

The decision to put Jefferson on the panel was made by Speaker Nancy Pelosi (Calif.), and House Democrats endorsed the move at a private meeting Tuesday night, but his appointment must be confirmed by a vote on the House floor. Such an action would normally be a formality, but Republicans said yesterday that they would pursue a rarely used maneuver to force a recorded vote on the matter.

"This is a terrible mistake by the Democratic leadership, to take someone with serious ethical allegations against him and put him on one of the most sensitive and important committees in Congress," said Rep. Peter T. King (N.Y.), the ranking Republican on the committee.

Pelosi ousted Jefferson from his seat on the powerful Ways and Means Committee in June after federal investigators raided his Capitol Hill office. In an earlier search of his home, $90,000 was found in a freezer. The money allegedly was accepted in a bribery sting involving an African technology company. Jefferson, who has not been charged, has maintained his innocence and was elected to a ninth term in December after a runoff election.

"You gotta wonder where Jefferson's gonna store all those homeland security secrets," said Rep. Patrick T. McHenry (N.C.), a deputy Republican whip. Other Republicans said Pelosi's decision contradicted her promise to create "the most ethical Congress in history." Said King: "It shows hypocrisy. Before the election, they made a big point of pulling him from Ways and Means and after the election, they put him on Homeland Security."

A spokesman for Pelosi said she opted to place Jefferson on Homeland Security because the panel oversees the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Jefferson had been a vocal critic of FEMA's performance during Hurricane Katrina, which affected thousands of his constituents.

But his appointment must be formally approved by the House, and Republicans said they would take the rare step of challenging the vote and requiring members to record their votes so Democrats will be forced to go on the record in their support of Jefferson.

Such appointments usually are ratified on the House floor by unanimous consent.

"I have a hard time seeing how the Democrats will vote in the open to put a person with serious ethical charges against him on Homeland Security," King said. "If he was too unethical to be writing tax law, he certainly shouldn't be on Homeland Security where he has access to intelligence materials and ongoing operations. Even with FEMA, we're going to be looking into allegations of corruption related to contracting around Hurricane Katrina."

Brendan Daly, a spokesman for Pelosi, said that if Republicans follow through on their threat, they would set a "dangerous precedent. A number of their own members are under investigation," he said, referring to Republicans allegedly under scrutiny by the Justice Department.

Jefferson called the Republican criticism "politics as usual."

"Speaker Pelosi did the right thing by placing the congressional member who represents hurricane-ravaged New Orleans on this committee," he said. "My district desperately needs a voice on this panel."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/02/28/AR2007022801945.html

A.

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Re: The Thread on Politics
« Reply #19 on: March 01, 2007, 11:10:46 AM »
Whatever happened to innocent until proven guilty?  Although I think this is a good point:

"I have a hard time seeing how the Democrats will vote in the open to put a person with serious ethical charges against him on Homeland Security," King said. "If he was too unethical to be writing tax law, he certainly shouldn't be on Homeland Security..."

He shouldn't have been removed from Ways and Means in the first place, imo.