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Author Topic: jd vs. mba  (Read 3621 times)

gillesthegreat

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Re: jd vs. mba
« Reply #10 on: November 16, 2006, 07:47:13 PM »
Does anyone else find it odd that to be admitted to the Northwestern JD/MBA, one needs only to take the GMAT, and not the LSAT?
Penn (2007)

cbm_flyer

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Re: jd vs. mba
« Reply #11 on: November 16, 2006, 09:32:52 PM »
Does anyone else find it odd that to be admitted to the Northwestern JD/MBA, one needs only to take the GMAT, and not the LSAT?

I did not know that; very interesting!  Of course, if you don't get into Kellogg, [imho] you're not going to NW Law either.

  K   -->   NW

Wow, I'm putting in all kinds of .02s today!  ;)

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Re: jd vs. mba
« Reply #13 on: November 19, 2006, 11:11:58 AM »

jarhead

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Re: jd vs. mba
« Reply #14 on: November 19, 2006, 06:03:04 PM »
an MBA/JD is a good thing to get...without going into my whole story if you've read any of my other posts you'll know that im a non-trad with a good amount of work experience...in my opinion the only time you should get an MBA is if it's necessary for you to advance in your current job or necessary for you to transition to another area in your field i.e. move into investment banking etc.... in any company there are generally two ways to go... you can become a specialist which means you get really good at what you do and are basically the subject matter expert...this is great if you really like what you do and don't want to play the management game...problem is at some point you will be stuck and not able to move any higher...decisions will be made that affect you that you have no say over and could begin to make the job you love to do suck...the other way is upper management...this is where an MBA becomes beneficial it puts you ahead of some of your competition who probably have similar seniority and experience but haven't bothered to get a graduate degree....long story short a JD is the most valuable graduate degree you can get for business...you can tailor you upper level courses to cover the same topics that you would get from an MBA program...a lawyer can be a CEO, Vice President etc. an MBA can't be a lawyer...unless he goes to law school...make sense?
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gillesthegreat

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Re: jd vs. mba
« Reply #15 on: November 19, 2006, 06:16:27 PM »
Quote
a lawyer can be a CEO, Vice President etc. an MBA can't be a lawyer...unless he goes to law school...make sense?

Well, if you become an important ($$$) enough CEO, you get to write checks to the GOP and you can write your own laws. Is that the same as being a lawyer?
Penn (2007)

jarhead

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Re: jd vs. mba
« Reply #16 on: November 19, 2006, 06:24:26 PM »
Quote
a lawyer can be a CEO, Vice President etc. an MBA can't be a lawyer...unless he goes to law school...make sense?

Well, if you become an important ($$$) enough CEO, you get to write checks to the GOP and you can write your own laws. Is that the same as being a lawyer?


in light of the recent election results i would say no
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Sweetpri

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Re: jd vs. mba
« Reply #17 on: November 19, 2006, 06:25:06 PM »
Does anyone else find it odd that to be admitted to the Northwestern JD/MBA, one needs only to take the GMAT, and not the LSAT?

I think it's weird...similar at American University you only need to take the LSAT, not the GMAT to get in their dual program.  

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JGCESQ

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Re: jd vs. mba
« Reply #18 on: November 29, 2006, 12:37:06 AM »
The answer depends on whether you actually prefer the law. If you go to law school, do it because you love the law, not because you want to get rich. If you're coming out of college, and your primary goal is to get rich, go to work at an investment bank, brokerage house, real-estate development firm, or computer-technology company and learn how that businesses works. While you're there, think about starting your own business or going to business school. 

Having been out of law school for a few years, I can't help but smile when I see so many people obsessed with the law-school admissions process. Unfortunately, the primary impetus for this competition appears to be money. The ironic truth, however, is that even the people who go to the most prestigious schools and work for the most prestigious firms very rarely get rich, and the few who do get rich will nevertheless wind up making salaries that are dwarfed by those of successful businessmen. Look at Forbes's list of the 400 richest Americans. How many practicing lawyers made the list? One. How many people from the finance, real estate, and computer-technology fields made the list? Hundreds.

Generally, law-school applicants fall into one of two categories: (1) those who have a genuine passion for the law; and (2) middle- and upper-middle-class kids who mistakenly think that practicing law is a good way to become rich. Of course, those who actually are rich know better. Indeed, very few children of the super rich go to law school, and even fewer go with the intention of practicing law. Why? Because they have no illusions regarding money.
 

jarhead

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Re: jd vs. mba
« Reply #19 on: November 29, 2006, 06:54:05 PM »
The answer depends on whether you actually prefer the law. If you go to law school, do it because you love the law, not because you want to get rich. If you're coming out of college, and your primary goal is to get rich, go to work at an investment bank, brokerage house, real-estate development firm, or computer-technology company and learn how that businesses works. While you're there, think about starting your own business or going to business school. 

Having been out of law school for a few years, I can't help but smile when I see so many people obsessed with the law-school admissions process. Unfortunately, the primary impetus for this competition appears to be money. The ironic truth, however, is that even the people who go to the most prestigious schools and work for the most prestigious firms very rarely get rich, and the few who do get rich will nevertheless wind up making salaries that are dwarfed by those of successful businessmen. Look at Forbes's list of the 400 richest Americans. How many practicing lawyers made the list? One. How many people from the finance, real estate, and computer-technology fields made the list? Hundreds.

Generally, law-school applicants fall into one of two categories: (1) those who have a genuine passion for the law; and (2) middle- and upper-middle-class kids who mistakenly think that practicing law is a good way to become rich. Of course, those who actually are rich know better. Indeed, very few children of the super rich go to law school, and even fewer go with the intention of practicing law. Why? Because they have no illusions regarding money.
 



agree, i may be one of the few on here who have no intention of being a lawyer i want the law degree because it will help me with my business
...man, you was who you was before you got here