Law School Discussion

Seattle U = TTT?

sk

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Re: Seattle U = TTT?
« Reply #20 on: December 28, 2006, 01:45:26 AM »
I think if  you havn't taken the lsat 3 times, and you have the potential to score higher, it def. might be worth sitting out a year.  Especially with the highest score policy in place.  The ammount of effort to score well on the LSAT seems less than attaining a high class ranking during 1L.  plus you can make and save more money.

transferring sounds difficult and stressful.

buts its a completely subjective call.




ummmm, I'm pretty sure UW still averages... check out the list of schools that still average on the LSAC website...

Re: Seattle U = TTT?
« Reply #21 on: December 28, 2006, 11:54:56 AM »
If you wait a year to matriculate, you do not "save" $50,000; in fact, you lose an entire year at your highest earning potential. Instead of practicing, say, 40 years and maxing-out at (2007 equivalent of) $125,000, you will practice only 39 years and earn a full $125,000 less than you could have. Moreover, you will have to cover living expenses for the year you wait around, in effect losing money that could have been invested in a home or other assets after law school.

For what it's worth, I would advise against waiting. It's pretty early in the cycle and your numbers aren't bad. If you don't make it at UW, I think Seattle U would get you into most reputable firms in the Pacific NW.

That's a very interesting breakdown, thanks, I never thought about it this way.

Brito

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Re: Seattle U = TTT?
« Reply #22 on: December 28, 2006, 05:26:36 PM »
If you wait a year to matriculate, you do not "save" $50,000; in fact, you lose an entire year at your highest earning potential. Instead of practicing, say, 40 years and maxing-out at (2007 equivalent of) $125,000, you will practice only 39 years and earn a full $125,000 less than you could have. Moreover, you will have to cover living expenses for the year you wait around, in effect losing money that could have been invested in a home or other assets after law school.

For what it's worth, I would advise against waiting. It's pretty early in the cycle and your numbers aren't bad. If you don't make it at UW, I think Seattle U would get you into most reputable firms in the Pacific NW.

1.  It seems that people generally work until they have as much as they want to retire.  In all likelihood, the person would just work an extra year, so no income lost.

2.  By not being as much in debt coming out of law school, the person would have $50,000 more to invest.  Over the course of an entire career, this could easily be more than one year's salary.

3.  You also have to take into account that by saving money early on, the person has a little more money and a little more freedom at a time when it is more sorely needed than at the end of a career.